Immortal?

SKU: VGCD019
Label:
Verglas
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Well it seems like the boys have gotten the formula bit closer to my taste this time around. Arena shows off their British neoprog roots with Clive Nolan's trademark wall of keys prominently jammed into every nook and cranny. But this time the band has come up with just the right touch of crunch to the guitars and general heaviness to instill interest in veteran prog metal fans. New vocalist Rob Sowden isn't going to make me toss my Dio albums out the window but he isn't half bad at that! A Clive Nolan album wouldn't sit right without an epic and Arena produces one in spades - the near 20 minute "Moviedrome". My pick of the litter is the 9 minute "The Butterfly Man". Gobble 'em up lads and lassies...

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
This CD was my introduction to this band and I'm very impressed.Real songs with a great singer to sing them. At last a true rock singer not a metal dude trying to sing past his range! Tasty guitar work too.Ghost in the Firewall/ButterflyMan and Moviedrome are all top notch tunes.Five out of Five!
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
It has ugly artwork, but don't be fooled by it! This is the best Arena's album, IMHO. It has all you can expect from Arena: excellent melodies, great musicianship and production, epic and dramatic songs.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
What "Script Of A Jester's Tears" was to the 80's prog scene, this release is to the current decade. Absolutely outstanding prog rock in the classic vein from messers Mitchell and Nolan. "The Butterfly Man" alone is worth the price of admission. Get it now before it disappears forever. Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
I dont know why everyone gave it 5, I would say 4.6, yeah this cd rocks, pure prog very good production and sound as well, a joy to listen to and I never hesitate to put it in my player, everytime I see it I play very appealing so i guess I should give it 5 then? :)
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
This CD was my introduction to this band and I'm very impressed.Real songs with a great singer to sing them. At last a true rock singer not a metal dude trying to sing past his range! Tasty guitar work too.Ghost in the Firewall/ButterflyMan and Moviedrome are all top notch tunes.Five out of Five!
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
It has ugly artwork, but don't be fooled by it! This is the best Arena's album, IMHO. It has all you can expect from Arena: excellent melodies, great musicianship and production, epic and dramatic songs.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
What "Script Of A Jester's Tears" was to the 80's prog scene, this release is to the current decade. Absolutely outstanding prog rock in the classic vein from messers Mitchell and Nolan. "The Butterfly Man" alone is worth the price of admission. Get it now before it disappears forever. Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
I dont know why everyone gave it 5, I would say 4.6, yeah this cd rocks, pure prog very good production and sound as well, a joy to listen to and I never hesitate to put it in my player, everytime I see it I play very appealing so i guess I should give it 5 then? :)
You must login or register to post reviews.
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