Perseverance

SKU: FES4003
Label:
Free Electric Sound
Category:
Fusion/Jazz
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28 years is a long time for a band to stay together but that's how long Woodenhead has been playing together. They have quietly cultivated a dedicated cult following in New Orleans. Now Free Electric Sound is bringing this extraordinary quartet to a national audience. Woodenhead's music is a spicy gumbo of jazz fusion, symphonic rock and local R 'n' B flavors (sorry for the wordplay!)

The group has toured the U.S. and Central America and has played the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival for over 20 years. The band has played with the Dixie Dregs, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Billy Cobham, Chick Corea's Elektrik Band, John McLaughlin Trio, Bela Fleck and The Flecktones, Tuck And Patti, Hugh Masekela, Spyro Gyra, Robben Ford, Johnny Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughn, and John Mayall, and has toured with the Steve Morse Band and Allan Holdsworth.

"Perseverance", the band's 6th album, was recorded live in New Orleans and captures all the energy and emotional playing of a Woodenhead gig. Augmented by a horn section, the band's music comes across as a blend of the Dixie Dregs, Happy The Man, and Hot Rats-era Zappa. This is an album with broad appeal to fans of jazz rock, prog rock and even Cajun music.

"At the New Orleans jazz festival, Woodenhead gets a standing ovation for teaching traditional jazz fans just how far imagination and electricity can push the form" - Esquire magazine

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Unfortunately this was recorded during the band's Dixie Dregs mini-me period.Which apparently they never grew out of.Not a bad CD mind you just not original enough.Throw in some Mahavishnu thrash and it is pretty much all she wrote for these guys.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Unfortunately this was recorded during the band's Dixie Dregs mini-me period.Which apparently they never grew out of.Not a bad CD mind you just not original enough.Throw in some Mahavishnu thrash and it is pretty much all she wrote for these guys.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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