Vampire State Building (Vinyl)

SKU: LHC122LP
Label:
Long Hair Music
Category:
Jazz Rock
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Rare German jazzrock originally released on the Philips label in 1971. The music of Alcatraz is based around Klaus Nagurski's flute/alto sax trading off with the fuzz distorted guitarwork of Klaus Holst. Long jamming tracks remind me more of Traffic than "Miles Davis meets Deep Purple" as purported by the label. A great one either way.  Higly Recommended.

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  • The third album from Haken once again demonstrates why they are at the forefront of the progressive metal scene.  The first two albums Aquarius and Visions are quite different.  Aquarius is a much quirkier album - lots of twists and turns that kept you off balance through out.  It had more of a prog rock feel and some real oddball approaches that resulted in some reviewers referring to it as circus meteal.  Visions was quite different.  It was much more linear and clearly defined in terms of content.  It was a prog metal album and wonderful one at that.The Mountain is the first release for the band's new home at Inside Out.  The direction of the band takes a bit of a u-turn.  The music falls somewhere in between the first two.  There is a quirky, prog rock vibe but you get the heaviness and complexity of prog metal.  One particular track I keep going back to is "Cockroach King" which essentially pays homage to Gentle Giant's counterpoint vocals.  Regardless of which direction you preferred, The Mountain has enough diversity to go please everyone.If you want to keep track of where progressive metal is headed then climb the mountain - this is where its at.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • It becomes a convenient crutch to describe every band emerging from Poland as sounding like Riverside.  In the case of Retrospective its actually true.  Lost In Perception comes 4 years after their debut Stolen Thoughts.  Granted this sophomore effort shows much more individuality.  Vocalist Jakub Rozsak doesn't sound anything like Mariusz Duda but the one thing they share in common is a great ability to sing with emotion.  You believe it.  There is a spacey vibe that does in fact sound like the earlier Riverside albums.  The good news is that while Retrospective isn't unique sounding, what they do they do extremely well.  This one is sneaking in at the end of 2012 as one of the better prog efforts we've heard in awhile. Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • Second album from the Swedish quartet of Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten), Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama), Ronny Eriksson, and Tomas Eriksson. Like their first album, I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity is pure psychedelic bliss. The songs have their roots in jam sessions. Overall there is a very German underground/krautrock feel. These long jams vary in tempo - from the buzz saw opener "Fire! Fire!" on through the blissed out Yatha Sidhra-like acoustic "Pagan Moonbeam". Lethal guitar leads augmented by dollops of Mellotron and organ are the order of the day. All served up with phat analogue sound. If its possible to get high from a round aluminum disc this is the one that will do it for you. Highly recommended to those you seek to explore the innermost nooks and crannies of their brain.
    $15.00
  • First time on vinyl - now spread out over 6 sides of beautiful 180 gram vinyl.  Comes with the album on 2CDs as a bonus."A legendary band in their own right, The Flower Kings have been at the forefront of progressive rock since their formation in 1994 by guitarist, vocalist, composer, astronaut, chef and veteran nut head icon Roine Stolt. Dedicating themselves to producing a strain of prog they like to call symphonic rock‘, they incorporated classical music, movie soundtracks and both jazz, ethno, blues and seventies metal elements to much success - and building themselves a dedicated fanbase in the process over ten studio albums before taking a break.After a triumphant return to action in 2012 - following an almost 5 year hiatus, The Flower Kings released "Banks Of Eden" in the summer of that year to a brilliant reaction from fans and critics alike. In celebration they toured the world for the better part of a year, visiting locations including Europe, Japan, Russia, Israel & USA. The following year the band hit the road once again, this time with old friends Neal Morse & Mike Portnoy to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of label InsideOut Music, where they played a hugely successful prog extravaganza to packed venues across Europe and the US.Never ones to rest on their laurels however, The Flower Kings immediately entered Fenix Studio in Sweden to start work on the recording of a brand new album. Recorded "live" in this classic, but modern, studio and on reel to reel tape, the album features a glut of grand vintage keyboards such as Hammond B3, Mellotron M 400, Fender Rhodes, Minimoog and a whole host of Tube amps.The band even decided to try a new approach to writing and recording, assembling music on the spot and arranging it as a team.The result of this wonderfully collaborative effort is an epic 10 song cycle entitled ‚Desolation Rose‘; an album that revolves around some of the more disturbing observations of mankind's failure to create the paradise they once hoped for – and the greed, fear and ignorance that caused that failure. The scenario is an observation by an angel who resides in a mysterious tower, looking down on all this ongoing perpetual insanity, yet unable to reach out and help.The band is very much back to their cinematic and melodic symphonic rock best, but with a heavier edge no doubt honed while on tour for the past year. The 10 songs contained within are to be heard as a sequence and the lyric thread is wonderfully cinematic, but again it is more of an observation that works both as a whole or as separate parts. It might be considered one of their most focused efforts to date, such is the impact the tracks have on the listener from the very beginning. From the opening 14-minute tour-de-force that is ‚Tower‘, right through the moody swagger of ‚White Tuxedo‘ and beyond, this album sees the band crafting what might be their most varied album yet.The Flower Kings are truly back where they belong, at the beating heart of the modern day progressive rock scene, and ‚Desolation Rose‘ is testament to their continued vibrancy, sonic potency and determination to keep the music driving forward."
    $32.00
  • "Right from the start, a vastly different Weather Report emerges here, one that reflects co-leader Joe Zawinul's developing obsession with the groove. It is the groove that rules this mesmerizing album, leading off with the irresistible 3/4 marathon deceptively tagged as the "Boogie Woogie Waltz" and proceeding through a variety of Latin-grounded hip-shakers. It is a record of discovery for Zawinul, who augments his Rhodes electric piano with a funky wah-wah pedal, unveils the ARP synthesizer as a melodic instrument and sound-effects device, and often coasts along on one chord. The once fiery Wayne Shorter has been tamed, for he now contributes mostly sustained ethereal tunes on soprano sax, his tone sometimes doubled for a pleasing octave effect. The wane of freewheeling ensemble interplay is more than offset by the big increase in rhythmic push; bassist Miroslav Vitous, drummer Eric Gravatt, and percussionist Dom Um Romao are now cogs in one of jazz's great swinging machines." - All Music Guide
    $7.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • 2LP gatefold vinyl edition includes the CD as well.  This version includes 3 bonus tracks, one of which is exclusive to this edition.Well Steve is done resucitating the Genesis catalogue and back to concentrating on fresh solo material.  The new album Wolflight is a bit of a loose concept album and I find it to be one of his strongest releases in years.  The album is filled with lots of guests (including Chris Squire) contributing exotic instruments to the mix adding an old world sound.  Steve's trademark sound is locked into place so if you are looking for the wailing guitar, liquid runs and acoustic delicacy you won't be disappointed.  His vocals has never been my favorite part of a Steve Hackett album but either I've mellowed in age or his voice has - not sure which.  Regardless it fits the music just fine.  Classic Hackett and nothing less.  BUY OR DIE!
    $25.00
  • First time on CD! Guru Guru made two excellent albums during their brief stay on Atlantic Records of which this is the first (Dance Of The Flames is the second). It is also the last album to feature original guitarist Ax Genrich. Although you can expect craziness and the usual sick playing, there is actually a bit of refinement to their sound - as though they are playing with a bit more control and restraint. Easily one of their best efforts and highly recommended. This gorgeous digipak edition features a bonus CD - a concert recorded on 9/15/73 at the German Rock Festival. Although sourced from an audience cassette, it's a previously unavailable taste of the band in a live setting - which is where the band really excelled.
    $12.00
  • 2LP 180g vinyl in a gatefold sleeve."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $30.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • First time on CD for the complete two part debut from this German acid psych trio.  The band is lead by guitarist Sula Bassana who you may know for his incredible solo albums.  The rhythm section is held down by Komet Lulu on bass and Pablo Carneval on drums.  Long psychedelic guitar driven space explorations that goes down the same road as the first Ash Ra Tempel and early Pink Floyd masterpieces.  The CD seet was mastered by Eroc of Grobschnitt fame so you know he gets it.  I'm getting high just typing this description!  Highly recommended.
    $21.00
  • New vinyl pressing of the band's magnificent second album.  Remastered numbered limited edition of 500 copies.  Gatefold sleeve and has a nice large fold out poster.
    $32.00
  • "On March 25th, 2014, Dream Theater performed at the Boston Opera House with very special guests from the Berklee College of Music orchestra and choir. Filmed and directed by Pierre and François Lamoureux, and mixed and mastered by Richard Chycki, Breaking The Fourth Wall (Live From The Boston Opera House) is over 2 hours in length, complete with special bonus features." 
    $21.00
  • 2LP 180 gram vinyl is a gatefold sleeve."When Mark Trueack announced the break-up of Unitopia, the feeling was like that of losing a close friend or family member. But Mark Trueack, (Truey), has been working on many projects at the same time. The United Progressive Fraternity evolved from the collaborations of some of Truey's favorite artists on a solo album yet to be released. The project took over Truey's consciousness to the point that he temporarily put aside the solo album to help assemble this cast of creative and innovative artists. Like a fraternity, this is no young bunch of artists trying to find their way. These are seasoned and experienced artists from some of prog rock's premier bands. The "fraternity" includes honorary members Jon Anderson and Steve Hackett amidst a cast of "Who's Who" in modern prog rock. The wonderful thing about the fraternity is that it will expand and grow over time to include some excellent surprise contributors in the future.But that is the future…let's talk about the present and their debut, Fall in Love with the World.The United Progressive Fraternity, for this debut album include some familiar names like Matt Williams, guitar; Dave Hopgood, on drums; Tim Irrgang, on percussion and Mark Trueack, on vocals; all from the band Unitopia. The Fraternity also includes original members: song-writer Guy Manning, (Manning and The Tangent), on vocals and keyboards; Daniel Mash, (Maschine, The Tangent), on bass guitar; Marek Arnold, (Seven Steps to the Green Door), on wind and keys; and Steve Unruh, on violin and flute. Honorary members include Jon Anderson, formerly the voice of the rock legend Yes: and Steve Hackett, on guitar, formerly the exquisite and innovative guitar sounds of the rock legend Genesis. Claire Vezina, also brings her beautiful vocals to the project.To open the album, what better way than with an overture? And "We Only Get One World" is full of sounds of voices from around the world mixed well with intricate and exquisite percussion, soft acoustic guitar and sounds from throughout the world all surrounded by a powerful heartbeat of drums. Like the opening of a classic Disney movie or a symphony of the world it welcomes you to the fraternity. The four minute overture sets the table well for the feast to come."Choices" introduces the theme of the album: protect the Earth, before it's too late. The opening classic radio excerpts that Unitopia has been famous for adding to the opening of its tracks is back. They are really a great way to introduce a song and Truey always selects an interesting and diverse spectrum of excerpts that fit so well. I think this might have been one of his best.Then Truey sings, "Choices make the world go round". Yes of course. But the world music surrounding this peace and the eerie stillness of the sound just force us to contemplate our future and meaning of life on the planet even deeper. That underlying Squire - like chunk of bass Daniel Mash is playing has an awesome King Crimson/Yes quality that adds that special touch to the track. Williams guitar is inspired and the solo sax from Marek Arnold is a fortunate treat.Hopgood, on drums and Arnold on clarinet open the third track, "Intersection" with a cool jazzy spirit. Then Truey returns with powerful vocals, "Hello will you stand in my way. Do you fall?" Do we ascend or fall? A very good question. Truey's warning reminds us of the choice we still have if we choose to exercise it. The keyboards, guitar and sax soloing are excellent. This music reminds me of the intricacy and the powerful design Unitopia used to create such a powerful mix of jazz and progressive rock elements. Irrgang's percussion tingles the ears."The Water" is one of the album's powerhouse highlights. Imagine getting to sing with your idol. Well Truey has always been a Jon Anderson on vocals, Yes fan; like many of us. This time he gets to sing with Jon about something that both artists feel strongly about in the world. The drying of the Earth. A powerful driving force uniting two powerful vocal talents...and members of the progressive fraternity…by coincidence. Williams guitar is innovative and a driving force throughout the production."Don't Look Back", is loosely based on a story Truey told me about an adventure that occurred to Unitopia accidently on their first tour in Europe. It was a wrong left turn that could have had disastrous effects on one of the first shows of that tour. But as Truey sings in the refrain, "Don't look back…no left turn". You can, as Truey sings, "shout with frustration, it's only direction I seek, in another world where no one understands the language I speak". Any world traveler or adventurer has felt the frustration. But the metaphor can mean oh so much more to one's life. Matthew's guitar and Arnold's clarinet add that perfect old world charm as Hopgood's heartbeat drums and Mash's bass help mimic Truey's heartbeat during the ordeal. Excellent work."Travelling Man (The Story of ESHU)" is my favorite track on the album. It is full of a worldwide sound of music and plenty of deep thinking. The story goes far back in time, beyond the famous "Crossroads" sung about by the famous blues singers of the American South. I will not spoil the story. After all you can Google it these days. But listen to the music as you are listening to Truey sing. The assemblage of music on this epic long track is full of the expanse of time and world cultures brought together by this fraternity of progressive artists. Along with Steve Unruh's flute you can hear one of my other favorite highlights of the album Steve Hackett's guitar soloing. That guitar is instantly recognizable. Unruh's violin helps add to the world celebration of this album. As Mark sings, "When will we all re-unite!" Manning's keyboard interlude just before Matt Williams rocking guitar solo is yet another highlight. Steve Unruh's violin solo immediately conjures memories of Charley Daniel's fiddle duel on "The Devil Went Down to Georgia". Everything you can imagine from an epic and more. The wonderful slow guitar solo that accompanies Truey at the end will bring tears almost as full as the ending of Unitopia's "Garden". I will not spoil it by providing the lyrics here. With Claire Vezina accompanying him it helps close one of the best songs of the year."Fall in Love with the World" opens with this strange poem by a guest narrator. It is actually yours truly. Yes, Truey invited me to write a short intro poem for the title track. Which was quite an honor. Thanks Truey. The title track is yet another classic highlight of what will truly be the group debut album of the year. This song sums up the weight and power of the message of this album. Enjoy life and this Earth to the best of your ability, but don't take what you don't need, and take good care of what has been given. Williams guitar and Truey's vocals rise to the usually strong levels we all remember from Unitopia. The refrain is perfect, "Fall in love with the world. The world needs to fall in love". It will have you singing along."Religion of War" closes the album with yet another powerful lyrical track asking us why faith must always be linked to violence. It is a powerful piece of music as well. Manning's innovative keyboard creations open the track with Truey singing, and Matt Williams and Daniel Mash providing their own guitar innovations. Hopgood's heartbeat drums keep great pace. Truey sings poignantly "It's not what your maker had in mind".All of the news out of the Middle East and around the globe is a reminder that these battles continue unending. Like a wink back to Genesis' "Blood on the Rooftops", the news continues to distract us from what we were meant to do here on Earth.If you order the deluxe edition, you will receive an extended version of "The Water" which is well worth the price. More orchestration and more of Matt Williams' excellent acoustic guitar work at the opening along with powerful vocal statements from Truey and Jon will complete this collection.Ed Unitsky's artwork is over the rainbow great. Ed simply is one of the best artistic interpreters of music on this planet and he outdid himself this time.Don't miss this innovative and complete debut for this globally expressive band. For fans that were worried about the breakup of Unitopia…there is no need to worry anymore.You are part of the fraternity. The fraternity of the world which we all belong to and are meant to enjoy. This is a truly extraordinary debut for a band that will be making major strides in the future." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $20.00