Correlations In Concert

SKU: MGART006
Label:
MG Art Records
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Wow!!  Pro-shot live performance of Manuel Gottsching, Harald Grosskopf, and Steve Baltes filmed in concert in Berlin on June 8, 2012.  Over two hours long and features material drawn from Blackouts and Correlations.

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