Zero/No Frills (2CD)

Zero/No Frills (2CD)

BY Blim

(Customer Reviews)
$20.00
$ 12.00
SKU: BLM-001
Label:
Blim Music
Category:
Psychedelic
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In the late 80s/early 90s the British space rock/psychedelic scene exploded with so called "festival bands".  Many of these bands recorded one album and disappeared (anyone remember the great Cherokee Mist or Tubilah Dogg?).  Delerium Records signed many of these bands and zines like Ptolemaic Terrascope and Crohinga Well helped cultivate and nature the bands.  One of the bands signed to Delerium was a band called Omnia Opera.  Blim is actually an offshoot of Omnia Opera, with drummer Neil Spragg being the common thread.

Blim recorded two professionally done albums that were only released on cassette.  This was still a popular medium and I imagine much easier for the bands to bring along with them to gigs and send through the mail.  

Like many of the bands at the time Blim shared a musical affinity with Ozric Tentacles.  In other words the music had roots in the psychedelia of Gong and the space rock of Hawkwind.  In the case of Blim there were slight jazz undertones thrown into the mix.  You will hear similarities to Ozric Tentacles but you wouldn't think of them copying them.  Zero finds the band as a six piece and No Frills has a paired down lineup (now as a quartet). 

Blim deserved a better fate than what they got.  These guys could really play and their music was as good as any of the bands that got a deal.  If anything there music had a bit more complexity than most of their counterparts and that made their music all the more interesting.

This 2CD set includes both cassette releases and each album has bonus tracks.  Over all its 150 minutes of prime space rock.  Highly recommended.

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