War Of Ages

SKU: NPR478
Label:
Napalm Records
Category:
Power Metal
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Austrian progressive power metal band Serenity has been a bit overlooked in the past but it appears as though their star is in ascendancy.  Ex-Whyzdom vocalist Clementine Delauney complements lead vocalist Georg Neuhauser quite well.  Perhaps she nudges him out of the spotlight a bit but all for the greater good.  The music has a large scale symphonic element that will draw comparisons to Kamelot.  Since they have toured with Youngblood & Co its not that surprising.  So the formula seems to be in place - two great vocalists married to melodic, bombastic metal.  Their best album.  Who's in?

 

Product Review

Tue, 2013-04-09 20:28
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0
Amazing album, clean male and female vocals from outstanding singers, with a bit of a Kamelot sound. One of the best releases so far this year, great playing, and great songs. This release should put them over the top,.
Mon, 2013-12-09 00:08
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0
By far my favorite album of 2013. The vocals are perfect, all the songs are good. Keyboards and guitars are present to give the music a good balance. Perfect album.
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Product Review

Tue, 2013-04-09 20:28
Rate: 
0
Amazing album, clean male and female vocals from outstanding singers, with a bit of a Kamelot sound. One of the best releases so far this year, great playing, and great songs. This release should put them over the top,.
Mon, 2013-12-09 00:08
Rate: 
0
By far my favorite album of 2013. The vocals are perfect, all the songs are good. Keyboards and guitars are present to give the music a good balance. Perfect album.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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  • Redemption is one of the leading progressive metal bands in the world today.  Formed in Los Angeles, California in 2000 by guitarist / keyboardist / songwriter Nicolas van Dyk, the band features legendary progressive metal vocalist Ray Alder of Fates Warning, as well as guitarist Bernie Versailles (Agent Steel), and the phenomenal rhythm section of Chris Quirarte (drums) and Sean Andrews (bass).Redemption’s combination of heaviness not usually found in progressive metal, irresistible melodies and emotional urgency has created a unique and resonant voice for this band that sets them apart from the many clones in the genre, and which has gained them the attention of fans, critics and musicians.Through the band’s first three studios CDs (2002s self-titled first release, 2005’s The Fullness of Time, and 2007’s The Origins of Ruin), Redemption gained a loyal fanbase and garnered rave reviews worldwide from critics, who describe Redemption’s music as“one of the best progressive metal acts to emerge in the past decade” – DPRP“magical aura and incredible songwriting” – BLABBERMOUTH“it's powerful, catchy, enslaving, technical; it's the whole bunch” – LORDS OF METAL“the new star on the US prog-metal sky” – SQUEALER ROCKSAfter touring in support of Dream Theater and documenting at headlining show at tour’s end entitled Frozen in the Moment, the band returned to the studio to release 2009’s Snowfall on Judgment Day and 2011’s This Mortal Coil.Performing in support of that record, in 2012 Redemption co-headlined the world-famous ProgPower Festival in Atlanta, where the band recorded a unique show featuring nearly 80 minutes of material and staged with complementary visuals that drive home the compelling emotional impact of this band.   That performance is now being released as a CD/DVD set with additional bonus material through Sensory Records, the band’s original label.  From fan favorites such as the never-before-performed Parker’s Eyes to the crushing emotional weight of Stronger than Death, Redemption’s performance captured the special ability of its music to deeply connect with fans.  In the words of one concert-goer, Redemption’s show “was definitely the most exhausting, personal and emotional musical experience I’ve ever had.” 
    $17.00
  • "Most bands will reach a creative peak at a certain point in their career after which they simply continue in a less interesting fashion before eventually calling it a day. Not so with Motorpsycho. After more than 20 years they continue to develop and to to challenge themselves artistically. On this epic, double concept album, easily their most ambitious yet, Motorpsycho has assembled the cream of classical and jazz musicians from world class ensembles established in Trondheim, their hometown. ”The Death Defying Unicorn” was first commisioned by Molde International Jazzfestival for their 50th anniversary in 2010 where it was performed on the main outdoor stage. This, however, has been partly re-arranged, refined and recorded from scratch at Propeller Studios in Oslo with Kåre Chr. Vestrheim once again co-producing as he did with ”Heavy Metal Fruit”. Ståle Storløkken (Supersilent, Elephant9, Humcrush, Terje Rypdal) is considered one of Norway´s top keyboardists but here he also comes into his full as a writer and not at least arranger of the two ensembles. His contributions to this album can not be stressed enough. Among the players in Trondheim Jazz Orchestra are wellknown names such as Kjetil Møster (Ultralyd), André Roligheten (Albatrosh) and Mathias Eick, not to forget star violinist Ola Kvernberg." Heavyweight cardboard gatefold sleeve and 180 gram pressing. Looks real sharp!FOREIGN CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO THE HEAVIER WEIGHT OF VINYL YOU WILL BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES.
    $30.00
  • New 2CD reissue of the band's first album, originally released in 1994.  The second disc contains 18 rare and previously unreleased tracks.  Cool new artwork as well.
    $11.00
  • Remastered edition with bonus tracks."In 1988, few heavy metal bands were comprised of all black members, and fewer had the talent or know-how to inject different musical forms into their hard rock sound (funk, punk, alternative, jazz, soul, rap) -- but N.Y.C.'s Living Colour proved to be an exception. Unlike nearly all of the era's metal bands, the group's music has held up over time, thanks to its originality and execution. Living Colour leader/guitarist Vernon Reid spent years honing his six-string chops, and was one of the most respected guitarists in New York's underground scene. He couldn't have done a better job selecting members for his new rock band -- singer Corey Glover, bassist Muzz Skillings, and drummer Will Calhoun -- as their now-classic debut, Vivid, proves. Though the album was released in mid-1988, it picked up steam slowly, exploding at the year's end with the hit single/MTV anthem "Cult of Personality," which merged an instantly recognizable Reid guitar riff and lyrics that explored the dark side of world leaders past and present (and remains LC's best-known song). The album was also incredibly consistent, as proven by the rocker "Middle Man" (which contains lyrics from a note penned by Glover, in which he pondered suicide), the funky, anti-racist "Funny Vibe," the touching "Open Letter (To a Landlord)," plus the Caribbean rock of "Glamour Boys." Add to it an inspired reading of Talking Heads' "Memories Can't Wait," the Zeppelin-esque "Desperate People," and two complex love songs ("I Want to Know" and "Broken Hearts"), and you have one of the finest hard rock albums of the '80s -- and for that matter, all time." - Allmusic Guide
    $7.00
  • "Right from the start I was impressed with the debut from this Roman Power/Prog Metal quintet, Noveria. Even just inspecting the artwork, which was created by none other than Simone Bertozzi, sparked my immediate interest. The bands sound instantly reminded me of Nevermore. The guitar work churned out by Francesco Mattei is very Loomis’-esque; super heavy chugging guitar, bordering almost death metal riffage (again ala Loomis) carries the songs into interesting territory.I anxiously awaited the vocals to enter not knowing if I’d be hearing Warrel Dane stylings or a more raspy approach ala Arch Enemy based on the riffage alone. Once Frank Corigliano‘s vocals finally entered it all made sense. Corigliano has more of a traditional power metal alarm clock vocal, but not overly zealous where it becomes comical. Frank’s vocals remind me very much of Jonny Lindkvist of Swedish Power Metal band, Nocturnal Rites (whom I am a fan of).Everything is very solid here, big heavy fast pace riffage, locomotive drumming, fanciful keys, and a booming vocal that complete this Roman outfit. While nothing super stands out, it is a release I definitely want to give more listens to see what else I can pick from. I also don’t mean to downplay the technical abilities of this band, they can all play…well! The unfortunate thing is t’s just all been done before. This release upon first listen is Nevermore with Jonny Lindkvist on vocals. This is not a bad thing, but it’s not necessarily flattering either. Fans of these bands will completely dig on Noveria. I hope to hear more from them in the future to see if Noveria expand upon the ideas from Risen and make it their own." - All About The Rock
    $15.00
  • New vinyl pressing of the band's magnificent second album.  Remastered numbered limited edition of 500 copies.  Gatefold sleeve and has a nice large fold out poster.
    $32.00
  • Beyond The Wall Of Time is the skull ripping new album from this French instrumental stoner trio.  Napalm has really scored big with My Sleeping Karma and Glowsun (they should tour together).7 lengthy tracks filled with wah wah laced solos over a pounding Butler/Ward influenced rhythm section.  Nice pacing to the tunes as they slow down and breathe and then explode in a fret filled fuzzed out lysergic fury.  The occasional dialogue sample and pedal effects amp up the psych quotient.  There can simply be one answer to this onslaught: BUY OR DIE!
    $5.00
  • Third album from this Tunisian metal band is their best. It marks the second album with Zaher Zorgatti on vocals. In my opinion Desert Call was a bit of a misstep. Zorgatti is a phenomenal singer but the band tried to mix Middle Eastern vocal stylings in with their power metal sound...and it was quite odd to these Western ears. Zorgatti is on vocals again and this time he sings in a bit more of a traditional sound. Tales Of The Sands reminds a bit more of Hope. The older Symphony X sound is here in spades but the Middle Eastern sounds blend in perfectly. In other words - on Desert Call the band took things a bit too far in the Tunisian direction where this sits just right. Mix a great vocalist with a familiar sound and add that special exotic twist and you come up with something unique and really involving. Pray these guys don't mess with the formula they have finally perfected. Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • "I actually found Carving an Icon quite the retroactively blind purchase, suspiciously ironic since I had been tracking this project for quite a while and assumed I knew what to expect from Morfeus in regards to his avant-garde songwriting and abstruse, distinctive approach to the axes. From this isolated point of view, his sonic handprint is indeed all over Viper Solfa, making the unreasonably long wait for Dimension F3H’s This Mechanical World somewhat easier to mitigate since the dude has at least kept the old creative mind juiced as ever. What I wasn’t quite able to ready myself for was the remaining contributions, hardly something to just gloss over, as Viper Solfa is presented as something of a “supergroup” after all as opposed to a mere side-project.Ronny Thorsen supposedly leads Viper Solfa for all formal intents and purposes, the proclivity for many a conflagration granted by his burly speaking timbre and rousing death roars is a concerted force to be reckoned with. It can be argued that he is just another head in the pack, hardly boasting the standalone merit to turn one’s knees to jelly, but Viper Solfa isn’t done yet. The centrepiece of the band isn’t actually Thorsen, but Miriam Renvåg, whose swaying, affecting timbre opens doors unexpected for the band both conceptually and stylistically. So while I can’t feign shock now, I do recall bemused skepticism at the introduction of such audaciously disparate factors. Renvåg’s voice is very sleek and refined, with an almost pop-caliber cadre of appeals that land Viper Solfa closer to bands such as earlier Sirenia once the vocal trade-off between Thorsen is taken into account. It isn’t what I expected, having come into this project for Morfeus alone, but I certainly applaud Viper Solfa for attempting to merge sodden, opaque, death growls with avant-garde female vocal idiosyncrasy.With nearly all preconceptions espoused by this point, and with Renvåg’s quivering and psychedelic banshee wails taking their mental toll, I realized that there are plenty of parallels that can be drawn between Dimension F3H and Viper Solfa. Symphonics are used sparingly and as punctuation as opposed to the primary arsenal. Morfeus is basically the main songwriter here, and he is still shipping out crunchers of high order in the modern black/death format he began employing in earnest on Legacy of Evil during his waning years with Limbonic Art. In fact, the hard-lined, basal distortion sounds very similar to that record, and as the rollicking, flighty webbing of tremolos grow thicker and denser, Carving an Icon hammers out a welcoming mat to the most unexpected clientele.This ends up being the album’s tripping point, however, as far too much time is spent grooming vocal melodies that sound almost shoehorned in just for the sake of keeping the singers occupied. Thorsen’s petulant rasp gets one-upped by Renvåg’s (sometimes sorely overacted) caterwauling, and the end result borders on the monotonous more often than it should. The band still makes a good show of their missteps, what with a dense, abysmal grandeur pervading the nether reaches of what is honestly a relatively compact and easy listen on the whole, but these shortcomings remain. Carving an Icon may not be a masterpiece, or even the best outlet for all of the talents involved, but I can promise that it sounds like absolutely nothing you have heard lately, or likely will in the near future. At the end of the day, a neat project that delivered at least a few truly lethal numbers like “Whispers and Storms,” “Deranged” and most notably the floods of choppy, aggrandized viscera that embody the aptly-titled “Vulture Kingdom.” My expectations are not in line with the norm due to my familiarity with Morfeus’ back-catalogue, so take of this what you will, but Carving an Icon got more than a few spins out of me."
    $7.00
  • "It has been an eventful year or so in the world of Haken. In September 2013, the sextet released what can only be described as a masterpiece of progressive music in the form of their third album, the magnificent ‘The Mountain’. This album received almost universal critical acclaim upon its release and even led to interest from the likes of Mike Portnoy (Flying Colors, Transatlantic) and Dream Theater’s Jordan Rudess. In the case of the former, it led to an invitation to play the inaugural ‘Progressive Nation At Sea’, but thanks to both ringing endorsements, the door to the American market has opened more widely of late. And if that wasn’t enough, Haken recently received no less than three nominations in the Progressive Music Awards, quite an achievement for a band so relatively young.However, with the smooth, also comes the rough and almost immediately following the release of this ‘breakthrough’ album, bassist Tom MacLean announced his departure from Haken. An apparently amicable split, it was nevertheless a hurdle that had to be overcome at a point when the largest wave of the band’s career was about to be crested. An international audition invitation was extended and, following an extensive search, a young American by the name of Conner Green was assimilated into the Haken collective. Welcome sir!In many ways, ‘Restoration’ a three-track EP is as much a bedding-in of their new colleague as it is an opportunity to maintain the momentum created by ‘The Mountain’ whilst a new full-length album is brought to life. That said, to consider ‘Restoration’ a stop-gap is disingenuous in the extreme. It may only contain three tracks, but when the three tracks last well over half an hour and sound this good, who cares?The three compositions that make up this EP are very loosely based on tracks from the bands 2007/08 demo days, thoroughly re-envisioned, re-worked and re-produced in order to reflect the changing personnel and the experience gained since the demos were originally written. The result is, frankly, stunning.Whilst it took me a good many spins and many hours of effort to get fully submerged into the world of ‘The Mountain’, the music on ‘Restoration’ is much more immediate to these ears. No less complex and challenging of course, but for some reason, the music has ‘clicked’ much more quickly here.The EP opens up with ‘Darkest Light’, (Official video below) an energetic track that ably demonstrates the up-tempo and powerful side of Haken well. It’s an agile composition too that alters pace and timing signatures seemingly at will and pulls in influences from everyone from Dream Theater to Meshuggah. The latter is primarily due to the impressive combination of Ray Hearne’s powerful drumming, the chunky guitar tones courtesy of Charlie Griffiths and Richard Henshall and Green’s intricate bass work. Importantly however, the song is never derivative and contains everything you now expect from a band at the height of their powers. It’s a piece of music that oozes class but also offers that touch of playful cheekiness that has become synonymous with the Haken sound.‘Earthlings’ is a completely different proposition entirely. For my money, its closest reference point would be ‘Deathless’ from ‘Visions’ in so far as it is a much more introspective track with real atmosphere and a quiet, brooding intensity that is utterly beguiling. The melodies are much more immediate, much more pronounced and the whole thing builds beautifully and stubbornly towards a fulfilling climax that pushes all the right buttons.The undisputed star of the show however, is ‘Crystallised’. At over 19 minutes, it offers a return of the Haken ‘epic’, joining the likes of ‘Visions’ and ‘Celestial Elixir’ in an already formidable armoury. If anything, ‘Crystallised’ may be even better than the aforementioned, thereby easily taking its place among the very best that Haken has ever created.First and foremost, the sheer ambition is staggering. The composition begins unassumingly enough but quickly reveals a more grandiose underbelly thanks to some lush orchestral arrangements. From then on, the gloves well and truly come off and Haken take us on a wondrous journey full of twists and turns, light and shade, lengthy and dextrous instrumental segments and gorgeous melodies that stay with you long after the music has ended.There are echoes of those Gentle Giant influences and nods towards ‘Cockroach King’ et al in some of the a capella segments as well as hints of ‘Pareidolia’ at other times, thanks to that by now familiar delivery of vocalist Ross Jennings. Never once do the extended instrumental passages, led by the flamboyant keys of Diego Tejeida feel contrived or out of place; they are full of those classic progressive overindulgences, further reinforcing the importance of the likes of Yes, early Genesis and many others, but crucially, they fit in with the core of the composition and seamlessly segue from one to another perfectly.And then, everything comes together in what I can only describe as a stunningly epic finale, the kind where the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end and you find yourself grinning from ear to ear, enveloped in a musical utopia. The melodies are so uplifting and gorgeous that, coupled with the grandiose return of the orchestral embellishments, mere words find it hard to adequately express just how good it makes you feel.The bones of these songs may have been written many years ago in the band’s infancy. However, they have been brought back to life in the most brilliant way possible; taking everything that’s been good about the band in recent years and applying them to their early past to create something truly special. I only wish that ‘Restoration’ was six, seven or eight songs long. Mind you, if it were, I think I might have fainted from bliss before reaching the conclusion." - Man Of Much Metal blog
    $14.00
  • Amazing how these guys are still able to bring it. A Night For Baku turns it up a notch and then kicks it into overdrive finding the boys from Cali unleashing their usual assortment of psych-tinged progressive mayhem. Somewhere...someplace...the Progressive Gods are looking down on us with a big grin on their faces...Djam Karet have delivered the real goods again.
    $15.00
  • Limited edition digipak comes with a bonus track - a cover of The Tea Party's "Temptation".First studio album in five years from this revered band. Like a fine wine, Nevermore keeps getting better with age, improving their game along the way. For my personal taste they are the best of the US power metal bands going and probably the heaviest. This album was produced by Peter Wichers and Andy Sneap mixed.
    $5.00
  • Dutch symphonic metal band EPICA celebrated their 10th anniversary with a one-night-only event, dubbed Retrospect. The band was accompanied by the seventy piece Extended Reményi Ede Chamber Orchestra and the Choir of Miskolc National Theatre, playing an unforgettable 3-hours best-of set.According to respected Dutch newspaper the Volkskrant "The band wrote a chapter of Dutch metal History" this evening. Rock Tribune (Belgium) thought it was "an unforgettable show".Ten high definition cameras captured this very special sold-out show while Epica played in front of nearly five thousand ecstatic fans in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. In addition to a collection of the band’s biggest hits from across the spectrum of their entire catalog, this once-in-a-lifetime spectacular also features the live debut of “Twin Flames” and the previously unreleased “Retrospect”, covers of classics by Vivaldi, Pergolesi, and Oscar-winning film composer John Williams, two guest collaborations with the venerable Floor Jansen (Nightwish, ReVamp), and a very special performance of their breakthrough single, “Quietus”, with founding members Jeroen Simons, Ad Sluijter, and Yves Huts.Nuclear Blast will release Retrospect as a deluxe hardcover book with 32 pages. Both as a 2DVD/3CD and 2Blu-ray/3CD version. Retrospect will contain the following fan favorites:01 - Introspect02 - Monopoly on Truth03 - Sensorium04 - Unleashed05 - Martyr of the Free Word06 - Chasing the Dragon07 - Presto08 - Never Enough09 - Stabat Mater Dolorosa10 - Twin Flames11 - Serenade of Self-Destruction12 - Orchestral Medley13 - The Divine Conspiracy - Anniversary Edition14 - Delirium15 - Blank Infinity16 - The Obsessive Devotion17 - Retrospect18 - Battle of the Heroes & Imperial March19 - Quietus20 - The Phantom Agony21 - Cry for the Moon22 - Sancta Terra23 - Design Your Universe24 - Storm the Sorrow25 - Consign to Oblivion26 - Outrospect                                                                                                                                                                                 Retrospect features this massive performance in its entirety, as well as exclusive interviews with all band members and behind-the-scenes footage from the show. 
    $48.00
  • "By the late-80’s, thrash became refined, advanced and varied, subgenres of the subgenre itself appeared, from power thrash to progressive while very few kept the original essence of the early days in their music. Even the extreme Teutonic acts embraced much more accessible sounds, moving away from their initial schemes because they had to evolve inevitably to prevail among the rest. During those times of diversity for thrash, Evildead put out their debut, which combined melody and violence in almost equal percentages. The enormous pile of generic groups demanded making a difference from the rest and these guys did it in their own way, although the uncertainty of those days eventually condemned them to languish in obscurity.The album features pretty direct thrash tunes of total aggression, “Unauthorized Exploitation” and “F.C.I./The Awakening” in particular are plenty of power and speed, with that rapid tempo and those sharp riffs attacking so intense. However, they’re not the topical raging thrash intended to be only heavy and rough because Evildead’s performance and song-writing preceding process show some sophistication and grace. The music is violent but at the same time slightly melodic on some sequences, immaculately played and exact, proving the experience and skills of veteran Juan García and Albert Gonzales specially, whose lines lead and determined the tunes. Some of those rabid riffs are quite intricate, not excessively difficult but they make a difference from other band’s lack of precision and exhausting palm mute riffing. So they alternate sonic violence with tenuous technique on those, while “Living Good” and the title-track increase the complexity of structures, introducing distinct riff series, lengthier instrumental passages and much more melody, which becomes a characteristic element of this material. On other hand, it seems the band is trying to not play it that technical and remain accessible and casual, far from the ambitious patterns Juan developed on his Agent Steel years. That resolution becomes evident on “B.O.H.I.C.A.”, the most scruffy chaotic number of the pack, which sounds like uncontrolled hardcore combined with humoristic lyrics. But there’s another exception of opposite nature here: “Holy Trials” is the most progressive composition, tender with some constant acoustic guitar arrangements that make it sound sentimental at times, along with much more meticulous riffs and alternative structures. Apart from those 2, the rest offer no difference: “Parricide” includes a killer intro with both guitarists having a friendly duel of weighty riffing, then it follows the usual band patterns of energetic rhythms and diverse riffs, while “Gone Shooting” puts bigger emphasis on vocals.Those who expected some trace of previous Juan García projects’ sound here will be disappointed, because this was never intended to be a sequel of Agent Steel or Abattoir. The band preferred to make it simpler, straighter without an excessive presence of melody and instrumental complexity. The lack of pretention is clear on some of these numbers, which are focused on the basic characteristics of thrash, making them limited and predictable sometimes. Although Evildead can’t deny their natural predilection for difficulty and melody, both inevitably present during the album, providing their music of excellence and class which most of their peers lacked. Luckily, melody isn’t a tiring element here like it became on post-80’s Artillery and Whiplash, but it’s obvious this material is far from extreme. Phil Flores’ voice contributes tremendously to make this stuff so polite and slightly commercial. His lyrics are incessant and omnipresent, his choruses repetitive and his tone particularly sweet. It’s one of those singers who could’ve sung for a hard rock group instead perfectly, whose presence lacks strength and attitude but manages to fit the nature of these cuts. His words are about entertaining usual issues of pollution, toxic waste and environmental apocalypse, though also combined with mysticism and evil inherited from excessive hours in front of TV watching horror movies. The group name makes it clear and in fact, this mixture of urban thrash identity and horror stuff wasn’t that common, probably just Rigor Mortis introduced some cinema inspiration in their imagery. It’s not only about zombies and witchcraft, expressions like “girl beware of my probing anal tongue dart, I'll kiss your bush, and spread your cheeks apart” on the final composition prove lust and sarcasm are also part of their policy.It’s a very competent record, surprisingly refreshing and aggressive, admirably executed and well-produced. It could’ve got further for sure, maybe the presence of thousands of other common thrash albums around relegated it to discreet success and I’m not talking about selling CDs. In contrast with most of inoffensive subgenre work of that period, Evildead still included velocity, brutality (in small portion) and some obscure lyrics in their music, showing some nostalgia for the good old times. Sadly, like what happened with many other promising bands, this enjoyable material came in the wrong time, shortly afterwards thrash was no longer popular." - Metal Archives
    $14.00