Visions

SKU: SR3060
Label:
Sensory Records
Add to wishlist 

In their brief existence, Haken are already highly respected within the British metal community, and their unique and imaginative genre-bending approach to music has garnered praise from all corners of the globe.

Haken’s debut “Aquarius” was well-received by world wide media including Classic Rock Presents Prog, Outburn, Decibel, Progression as well as webzines. Their new release, “Visions” is yet another conceptual work encompassing sci-fi themes. Haken seamlessly meld metal with progressive rock, drawing influences from contemporary bands like Dream Theater and IQ as well as “old school” icons Genesis and Queen. Often bombastic and over the top, “Visions” features the addition of a string section and audiophile production from Spacelab Studios in Germany.

During the past year, the band has toured extensively in Europe highlighted by an appearance in Germany at the prestigous Night Of The Prog festival in support of Dream Theater. The band made its US debut at ProgPower USA in September 2011.

Product Review

Sun, 2011-11-20 12:40
Rate: 
0
Wow. This CD has blown me away and is definitely in my Top Ten for 2011. Nice mixture of British metal (Threshold) and Dream Theater. Think progressive symphonic metal and you've got it. Highly recommended.
Sun, 2011-12-04 18:37
Rate: 
0
This CD is simply Brilliant. Their first disc was also very good and here they have taken it to another level. This is what progressive music is all about. GH
Wed, 2012-02-15 17:16
Rate: 
0
What can one say regarding Haken, that hasn't already been said, they're a dynamic band that continues to push the boundaries of progressive music sans genre. Stylistically, they remind of the likes of King Crimson, Pink Floyd, early Genesis, Rush, latter period Beatles, with a smattering of Metallica. Though they're never a derivative of any of the aforementioned. To me, they are what bands like Transatlantic, and even the mighty, vaunted Dream Theater haven't been, for a long time.... namely original, exciting, and innovative. Simply put, the new Genesis, has arrived, with a swagger all they're own, Haken. Chalk up another winner for Progressive music's most prolific, finest label. Easily co-album of the year, along with Symphony X great ICONOCLAST. THANK GOD FOR KG, AND LASER'S EDGE, SAVING THE WORLD FROM MINDLESS POP DRIVEL, ONE BAND AT A TIME..
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

Sun, 2011-11-20 12:40
Rate: 
0
Wow. This CD has blown me away and is definitely in my Top Ten for 2011. Nice mixture of British metal (Threshold) and Dream Theater. Think progressive symphonic metal and you've got it. Highly recommended.
Sun, 2011-12-04 18:37
Rate: 
0
This CD is simply Brilliant. Their first disc was also very good and here they have taken it to another level. This is what progressive music is all about. GH
Wed, 2012-02-15 17:16
Rate: 
0
What can one say regarding Haken, that hasn't already been said, they're a dynamic band that continues to push the boundaries of progressive music sans genre. Stylistically, they remind of the likes of King Crimson, Pink Floyd, early Genesis, Rush, latter period Beatles, with a smattering of Metallica. Though they're never a derivative of any of the aforementioned. To me, they are what bands like Transatlantic, and even the mighty, vaunted Dream Theater haven't been, for a long time.... namely original, exciting, and innovative. Simply put, the new Genesis, has arrived, with a swagger all they're own, Haken. Chalk up another winner for Progressive music's most prolific, finest label. Easily co-album of the year, along with Symphony X great ICONOCLAST. THANK GOD FOR KG, AND LASER'S EDGE, SAVING THE WORLD FROM MINDLESS POP DRIVEL, ONE BAND AT A TIME..
You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • CD version of the live show from Katowice, Poland in 2005. Basically the audio soundtrack of the DVD previously available. Digipak - supposedly a limited edition.
    $9.00
  • "When Rush issued Vapor Trails in 2002, they revealed that -- even after Neil Peart's personal tragedies in the 1990s had cast the group's future in doubt -- they were back with a vengeance. The sound was hard-hitting, direct, and extremely focused. Lyrically, Peart went right after the subject matter he was dealing with -- and it was in the aftermath of 9/11 as well, which couldn't help but influence his lyric writing. In 2004 the band issued a covers EP that was in one way a toss-off, but in another a riotous act of freewheeling joy that offered a side of the band no one had heard for 30 years. There were a couple of live offerings and a 30th anniversary project as well that kept fans happy perhaps, but broke -- though Rush in Rio was the kind of live album every band hopes to record. Snakes & Arrows represents the band's 18th studio album. Produced by Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Velvet Revolver, Superdrag), the record is another heavy guitar, bass, and drums...drums...and more drums record. The title came -- unconsciously according to Peart -- from a centuries-old Buddhist game of the same name about karma, and also from a play on the words of the children's game Chutes and Ladders. Its subject matter is heavy duty: faith and war. From the opening track (and first single), acoustic and electric guitars, bass hum, and Peart's crash-and-thrum urgency in the almighty riff are all present. When Geddy Lee opens his mouth, you know you are in for a ride: "Pariah dogs and wandering madmen/Barking at strangers and speaking in tongues/The ebb and flow of tidal fortune/Electrical charges are charging up the young/It's a far cry from the world we thought we'd inherit/It's a far cry from the way we thought we'd share it...." At the same time, inside the frame of the refrain, Lee refuses to be conquered in the face of chaos: "One day I feel like I'm ahead of the wheel/And the next it's rolling over me/I can get back on/I can get back on." Alex Lifeson's guitars swell and Peart's crash cymbals ride the riff and push Lee to sing above the wailing fray. Great beginning."Armor and Sword" contains an instrumental surprise. After an initial ride-cymbal clash, the guitar and bassline sound exactly like King Crimson playing something from Red or Larks' Tongues in Aspic. The theme is repeated on an acoustic guitar before Lee begins singing about the shadowy side of human nature brought on by the many times children are scarred in development. The boom and crackle of electric guitars and bass are all there, but so is that sense of melody that Rush have trademarked as Lee states, "...No one gets to their heaven without a fight/We hold beliefs as a consolation/A way to take us out of ourselves...." There is no screed for or against religion per se, but a stake in the claim of hope and faith as absolutely necessary to accomplish anything, hence the refrain. Peart beautifully articulates the dark side of life's undersurface; he has been writing the best lyrics of his entire career on the band's last two studio records -- only two in the last ten years. The dynamic works against the melody and Lifeson's brief but screaming solo is a fine cap on it. "Workin' Them Angels" blends the acoustic against the electrics gorgeously, and Lee sings counterpoint to the guitars. "The Larger Bowl" is one of those Rush tunes that builds and builds both lyrically and musically, beginning with only Lee's voice and Lifeson's acoustic guitar. Its shift-and-knot rhythms and spatial dynamics offer the impression -- as does the rest of the album -- that the bandmembers are playing in the same room at the same time (it happened to a lesser degree on Vapor Trails, but here the impression is constant). The sounds -- both hard and soft -- blend together wonderfully. The live feel of the record with its sonic washes and overdubbed guitars and vocals creates near chaos without loss of control. It's like teetering on the edge of an abyss with one eye on both sides of it. Song by song, the notions of tension build, taking the listener to a place where hope and faith are challenged continually, not only in the face of the entire world, but in one's personal relationships -- check "Spindrift." Echoes of T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Robert Frost, Matthew Arnold, and The Odyssey are glanced upon, as is The Dhammapada in the Buddhist scriptures -- with more of a thematic than referential purpose.Amid all this seriousness, there is a bit of humor. The instrumental track "Malignant Narcissism" references a line in the comedic film Team America: World Police from Matt Stone and Trey Parker of South Park fame. It comes from a line in the film that reveals how terrorists think. It's one of three absolutely stunning instrumentals; another is "The Main Monkey Business," which sounds like the closest Rush have gotten to jamming in the studio in over 20 years. Think of the intensity of 2112 with the musicianship of Vapor Trails, and you begin to get a picture: screaming guitars, deep bass thrum, soaring keyboards, and all those pop-and-boom drums from Peart's massive kit. "The Way the Wind Blows" is Rush taking on the blues in massive metallic style, and it feels more like Cream in the intro. Lee's vocal drives deep inside the lyric -- it's tense, paranoid, yet revelatory. It's about the perverse magnetism of religion and war, and how both are seemingly designed to be cause and effect: fanatical religiosity leads to war. There are different theories on this, but Peart distills them well, as if he's read (but not necessarily completely understood) René Girard's seminal work Violence and the Sacred. The album changes pace a bit with the instrumental "Hope," a largely 12-string acoustic guitar piece played off a medieval theme by Lifeson. "Faithless" is anything but. It's one of those Rush tracks where counterpoint vocals against the guitars and basslines create that unique welling of sound that occurs when the band is at its peak on-stage. The set ends with "We Hold On," a track that expresses the sum total of all the struggles life offers and holds. Here Eliot the poet is quoted directly at the end of the third verse. It's anthemic, with backmasked guitars, Peart playing actual breaks, and Lee's bass holding the chaos together with a constant pulsing throb, guiding the various knotty musical changes back to the center of the verse and refrain, which is the place where the cut just explodes in sonic fury. Snakes & Arrows is one of the tightest conceptual records the band has ever released. Musically, it is as strong as their very best material, without a lapse in texture, composition, production, musicianship, or sheer rock intensity. There are real heart and fire in this album. It was well worth waiting for." - Allmusic Guide
    $8.00
  • "Recorded live over 3 nights in October 2003 (17th-19th).In the summer of 2003 Cardiacs were charged with the unenviable task of casting a wincey eye back.Way back to before Sarah hung up her little saxophone, before Tim Quy broke the nausea rule, before THE CONSULTANT and Miss Swift held the reins. Way, way back.For that coming October’s ‘Special Garage Concerts’, Cardiacs were expected to wipe the grime of the dusty archive from thirty-two tunes everyone had long since forgotten about. Cardiacs dutifully frittered away the waning days behind locked doors, exhuming songs from clanking, obsolete machinery and reams of faded manuscript. Music from the band’s conception in 1976 to their ‘coming of age’ in 1983 was given the dressing down THE ALPHABET BUSINESS CONCERN had always wisely insisted it deserved.With the arrival of autumn the songs had somehow taken on a raw, definitive bent. Haphazard approximations you may have previously heard performed by wide-eyed, puny youths were given deftness, muscle and swagger by the four grizzled and worldly-wise men proudly standing their ground under the Cardiacs banner today.This nostalgic arsenal was duly recorded over three consecutive nights at London’s sizeically challenged ‘The Garage’ concert venue. Privileged witnesses described the spectacle as "one-fifth loving recreation, two-fifths exercise in futility and four-fifths sheer brute force."Cunningly encrypted on to two Compact Discs, as never they were meant to be, Volumes One and Two are a unique testament to pure bloody mindedness and musical irrelevance.Both volumes contain music that has never previously been recorded and re-workings of other tunes that many of the faithful claim to have ‘insider knowledge’ of.They don’t have a clue."
    $34.00
  • Reissue of the first album from this eclectic British neoprog band. Red Jasper always stood out from the crowd. They drew equally from the genres of progressive rock and folk rock. You get this weird hybrid of Fairport Convention meets Marillion. Instrumentation included electric mandolin and tin whistle so you get this sound that was somewhat like late 70s Jethro Tull but with much more elaborate song forms. Lead vocalist Davey Dodds is like a cross between Geoff Mann and David Bowie. Long out of print, this new edition comes with three bonus tracks.
    $18.00
  • "If you consider that most of the prog rock in the last 20 years has gone either the progressive metal path (Dream Theater, etc.) or the revival path (Transatlantic, etc.), North Atlantic Oscillation offers real freshness. A curious blend of electronics, ethereal melodies and Beach Boys/Simon & Garfunkel (or even Yes) vocals, but also reminiscent of Radiohead post "Ok Computer" or those lunatics called Sigur Rós. So, nothing to do with Genesis, King Crimson or ELP here, buy maybe some Pink Floyd flavour. NAO are, with Anathema, the best representatives of the so-called "post-progressive" genre (both of them under the umbrella of the K-Scope label). After their very recommendable "Fog Electric", "The Third Day" follows this unique sound that may be catalogued as "easy-listening" in the first place, but there's really more than meets the ear, and their tunes, although being catchy, are not easy at all. There's something addictive in the music of this Scottish combo, a strange beauty in songs like "Elsewhere", "August", "Penrose" or "Wires". Like watching clouds and figuring out their vaporous forms, this is what NAO music is about." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • German power metal masters. New remastered edition features 5 bonus tracks!
    $13.00
  • Leprous are an exciting young band from Norway. They made a great album for our label in Tall Poppy Syndrome and have now found a new home at Inside Out. Bilateral is the band's third album. It continues their tradition of mixing progressive rock and metal in equal doses. They serve it up in a way that continually leaves the listener off kilter. This time Einar Solberg sings almost (but not totally) with clean vocals. There is still quite a bit of heaviness. The music constantly challenges you and at times isn't all that pleasant to listen to...but you can't stop. If Van Der Graaf Generator recorded a metal album it might sound something like this. Album of the year candidate...you must own this!
    $14.00
  • Long defunct but quite good German melodic metal band with progressive touches.
    $13.00
  • Remastered edition of the band's classic 4th album with two bonus tracks.  Its a concept album that literally defined classical rock.  Sure its pop oriented but the overarching progressive elements are prominent through out.  Highly recommended and at 5 bucks a steal.
    $5.00
  • "While "Airbourne" (released in 1976) represents the declining years in terms of Curved Air's success and popularity, it does have some historical significance as it was the band's last official studio album. "Airborne" is also notable as Stewart Copeland, who went on to find superstardom as drummer with the Police, plays "heavy artillery" (i.e. drums) here. He had already appeared on Curved Air's "Midnight wire" album, which was released just after the reunion of (most of) the original line up for "Curved Air live". From that re-union, violinist Daryl Way remained in the band, the line up for "Airbourne" being completed by guitarist Mick Jacques, and Tony Reeves on bass.Copeland, who had recently married lead singer Sonja Kristina, participated in the song writing for the first time when he co-wrote the music for the opening track, "Desiree" (which was released as a single) along with Jacques, and the co-wrote lyrics with his new wife.The three Daryl Way tracks are the eye catchers here, in particular "Moonshine". This track stands head an shoulders above the other songs on the album, especially in prog terms. While not quite as appealing as previous Curved Air masterpieces such as "Vivaldi" ("Air conditioning"), or "Metamorphosis" ("Air cut"), "Moonshine", which runs to about 10 minutes, is an impressive piece of work. The pace and mood of the track change regularly throughout, moving from soft delicate passages, to virtuoso violin by Way, and some fine symphonic keyboards. At times, there are echoes of Gentle Giant among others.The rest of the tracks effectively play a supporting role. Side one consists of five short numbers. "Desiree", is a pop-rock opener, which features multi-tracked vocals by Sonja Kristina, and some decent, if brief, lead guitar. Quite why the band felt the need to multi-track Kristina's voice is something of a mystery, but it is a sound which features on several of the tracks here. Copeland's composition "Kids to blame" is a fairly innocuous piece of pop rock, but he took it with him to The Police, where it featured in their live act.The closing track on side one, "Touch of Tequila", is the antithesis of "Moonshine", being a dreadful pop influenced song, which sees Kristina sounding a bit too like Irish Eurovision star Dana!There are a couple of decent ballads, "Broken lady", co-written by Sonja Kristina, and Daryl Way's lullaby "Dazed", which closes the album."Airbourne" is an album of peaks and troughs, ranging from the excellent prog of "Moonshine" to the disastrous pop of "Touch of Tequila". In all though, a worthwhile effort, which will, in the main, please fans of the band." - ProgArchives
    $19.00
  • Gorgeous reissue, housed in a mini-lp sleeve, of the legendary first album from Jacqueline Thibault aka Laurence Vanay.  Original copies of Galaxies sells for astronomical money.  Until recently not much was known about "Laurence Vanay".  As you may have figured out, Ms. Thibault was the wife of famous French producer Laurent Thibault, who you French prog buffs should be familiar with.  This was released under a pseudonym by a small label in 1974.  The music is beautiful ethereal spacey prog.  Ms. Thibault mostly provides wordless vocals over organ, flute, guitar, bass and drums.  On some of the quieter, folky tracks she does sing actual lyrics.  You might even hear a touch of Zeuhl here and there but overall think in terms of early 70s Pink Floyd.  Transferred from the original master tapes, this set arrives with a ton of bonus tracks and a detailed biographical booklet.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Fourth album from this seminal US band. Deluxe remastered reissue also features detailed liner notes, 2 bonus tracks, original artwork and unseen photos.
    $15.00
  • First album with the Annie Haslam fronted band. Not their best but a just a foreshadowing.  Still solid classical prog rock none the less.  Must have.
    $8.00
  • Been some time since I've caught up with Eddy Antonini's band. Fairytales is their 7th album and it still features Antonini's ornate keyboards and classical influences but it's blended in with traditional speed metal. I noticed that a female singer is now featured prominently so you get male/female lead vocals. They stomp out a cover version of Mike Oldfield's "Moonlight Shadow".
    $9.00