Traced In Air

SKU: SOM182
Label:
Season Of Mist
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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F I N A L L Y ! ! !


Fantasy becomes reality - after 15 years Cynic has returned with their second album and it does not disappoint on any level. Traced In Air is not a rehash of Focus. Instead it sounds like Cynic...15 years later. You can hear commonality with Focus but its a further evolution. Paul Masvidal downplays the death vocals (although present). The mechanical vocal processing reappears as a wink and a nod to the old days. Reinert and Malone are as titanic a rhythm section as any in metal. Jason Gobel did not return but new guitarist Tymon Kruidenier is a more than able replacement. His former band Exivious was heavily influenced by Cynic - in other words he groks it completely. Compositionally its right up there with Focus - a unique mix of technical metal with fusion underpinnings. Lots of bands are influenced by Cynic but no one sounds quite like them. Traced In Air is pure alchemy. This will top most year end best-of lists and rightfully so. An album that will be talked about for years to come. BUY OR DIE!!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
Great album by superbly talented musicians. The songs are excellently crafted (nothing approaching a weak track exists on this CD) with the death vocals kept to a minimum. The only nitpick I have (and this is really minor) is that the album is short (32 minutes). That said, it's not the quantity it's the quality and quality is there in a big way. Hopefully we won't have to wait 15 years for the next release! Mike
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
This album (or is it just a long EP?) kicks ass start to finish. At only 33 minutes, it's way too short but damn if you don't get your money's worth. The music really defies categorization although the closest I can come up with is prog metal with jazz and prog rock leanings. Simply mesmerizing and will occupy a special place in my CD player for a long time. Get it before it's gone forever! Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
Album of the year. End of discussion.
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
This disc was strongly "pimped" on the ProgPower Forum, so I checked it out. After several listens and a few days to digest it, I've come to a conclusion. This is simply not my cup of tea whatsoever! The music is very close to early Opeth, another band which I don't care for. In addition, there's a strong jazz influence prevalent in the song writing, which again, is a turn off to me. Lastly, there's a mix of clean and death vox, which doesn't bother me these days. With that said, it doesn't add much to the music for me. Lastly, I can understand all of you progheads diggin' this, but beware if you you're a casual prog fan like myself.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
Great album by superbly talented musicians. The songs are excellently crafted (nothing approaching a weak track exists on this CD) with the death vocals kept to a minimum. The only nitpick I have (and this is really minor) is that the album is short (32 minutes). That said, it's not the quantity it's the quality and quality is there in a big way. Hopefully we won't have to wait 15 years for the next release! Mike
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
This album (or is it just a long EP?) kicks ass start to finish. At only 33 minutes, it's way too short but damn if you don't get your money's worth. The music really defies categorization although the closest I can come up with is prog metal with jazz and prog rock leanings. Simply mesmerizing and will occupy a special place in my CD player for a long time. Get it before it's gone forever! Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
Album of the year. End of discussion.
Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
This disc was strongly "pimped" on the ProgPower Forum, so I checked it out. After several listens and a few days to digest it, I've come to a conclusion. This is simply not my cup of tea whatsoever! The music is very close to early Opeth, another band which I don't care for. In addition, there's a strong jazz influence prevalent in the song writing, which again, is a turn off to me. Lastly, there's a mix of clean and death vox, which doesn't bother me these days. With that said, it doesn't add much to the music for me. Lastly, I can understand all of you progheads diggin' this, but beware if you you're a casual prog fan like myself.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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  • "Few bands of the era offered as much variety in material from night to night. King Crimson’s propensity for improvisation & fondness for playing its newest material – often unreleased on record at the time of the concerts - is legendary. Fewer bands still, whether by accident or design, recorded so many of their live shows.Starless offers an in depth overview of one of the era’s most significant bands in its most celebrated live line-up.Autumn 1973: As King Crimson’s second lengthy US tour of that year was coming to a close, a short series of UK concerts for the end of October, followed by a more extensive European tour in November was already planned. Three of these concerts; Glasgow, Zurich & Amsterdam, were recorded as full multi-track recordings, with material from the Amsterdam show being used as core material for the January 1974 recording of Starless & Bible Black. From mid-March to the start of April, the band was on the road in Europe again, promoting the album with their final European concerts of the decade, prior to undertaking a further US tour. A number of these concerts were recorded on stereo reel to reel machines, fed directly from the signal as sent to the PA system on the night of the performance. These soundboards are often referred to as “The Blue Tapes”, named after the outer colour of the original tape boxes & are especially valued for both the quality of recording & performance.This boxed set presents eighteen CDs of live concert performances, seven of them mixed from the 1973 multi-track tapes and a further eleven presenting the complete run of “The Blue Tapes” for the first time. CDs of the ORTF Paris TV performance & the 2011 stereo mix of Starless & Bible Black also feature. Two DVD-A discs & two Blu-Ray discs contain concert & studio recordings in stereo, quadraphonic & full 5.1 surround sound – all presented in high-resolution audio."
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  • "When Tosin Abasi released his debut solo album under the moniker ANIMALS AS LEADERS in 2009, few would have predicted the band’s meteoric rise to the apex of the progressive rock/metal world. Although Abasi earned acclaim as the lead guitarist in the Washington, D.C.-based metalcore act Reflux, it was still a long-shot that an instrumental album of progressive metal with jazz, electronic and ambient flourishes would develop anything more than a cult following.Fast-forward two-plus years to Weightless, the group’s sophomore effort, and ANIMALS AS LEADERS is revered worldwide as a trailblazing pioneer of modern heavy music. The group’s genre-defying compositions have earned extensive praise — Steve Vai called the band “the future of creative, heavy virtuoso guitar playing.” Guitar World Magazine also featured Abasi on the cover twice over the course of this album cycle, further cementing his legendary status within the current progressive scene.Now in 2014, ANIMALS AS LEADERS delivers what is quickly going to be hailed by fans and media alike as the group’s career defining release that will ultimately redefine the progressive world as we know it. This third full-length release is a bombastic, dynamic and innovative explosion incorporates elements spanning across the entire musical spectrum. It also marks the recording debut of drummer Matthew Garstka, whose technical proficiency and unique style allows Abasi and guitarist Javier Reyes the room to push their boundaries to previously unthinkable heights.Reyes states: “I think some of the new tracks are some of AAL’s strongest and musical material yet and extremely happy with how the album came out. Everyone who took part with this album (Misha Mansoor (Periphery), Adam Getgood (Periphery), Diego Farias (Volumes), and Navene Koperweis) is extremely talented and I think we’ve done a great job of capturing it onto what is now the third ANIMALS AS LEADERS album.”"
    $12.00
  • "Alice Cooper wasted little time following up the breakthrough success of Love It to Death with another album released the same year, Killer. Again, producer Bob Ezrin was on board and helps the group solidify their heavy rock (yet wide-ranging) style even further. The band's stage show dealt with the macabre, and such disturbing tracks as "Dead Babies" and the title track fit in perfectly. Other songs were even more exceptional, such as the perennial barnstorming concert standard "Under My Wheels," the melodic yet gritty "Be My Lover," and the tribute to their fallen friend Jim Morrison, "Desperado." The long and winding "Halo of Flies" correctly hinted that the band would be tackling more complex song structures on future albums, while "You Drive Me Nervous" and "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah" showed that Alice Cooper hadn't completely abandoned their early garage rock direction. With Killer, they became one of the world's top rock bands and concert attractions; it rewarded them as being among the most notorious and misunderstood entertainers, thoroughly despised by grownups." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Following two highly successful tours with established Progressive metalists PAIN OF SALVATION and two years of exacting work, DARK SUNS have finished their third album "Grave Human Genuine.""Grave Human Genuine" – this unconventional title was chosen with care and purpose, as it represents the three characteristic elements of this work: "Grave" signifies darkness, the sinister force, and the inevitable fate. "Human" is synonymous with the music’s inherent soul-depth, while "Genuine" means "real" or "authentic" and hence refers to DARK SUNS’ uncompromising approach to music.But what about the music? DARK SUNS don’t merely pick up where the successful predecessor "Existence" (2005) left off, they present themselves as many-facetted as never before. A clear nod to Doom, complex polyrhythms, unusual and diverse instruments and, last but not least, drummer NIKO KNAPPE’s characteristic yearning vocals comprise the album’s cornerstones. The variety of sounds stretches from angular Metal riff attacks via atmospheric ambient soundscapes and Techno reminiscences to Avant-garde influences – despite this complexity, an accomplished musical mosaic of enormous expressiveness.Exciting nuances are created by the incomparable bass of Pain Of Salvation’s long-time member KRISTOFFER GILDENLÖW, a friendly turn that resulted from the tours mentioned above, and DISILLUSION’s SCHMIDT’s guest vocals in "Flies In Amber."With "Grave Human Genuine," DARK SUNS have created a haunting album full of autonomy and instrumental class, self-consciously charting new musical territory. In this, the band from Leipzig embodies the essence of every true progressive band: compositional genius coupled with advancement. The dark suns radiate: gloomy, human and egregiously genuine.
    $6.00
  • "It has become patently unfair to review a Luca Turilli creation as a “metal album.” No matter what you call it… “cinematic metal,” “symphonic metal,” “classical metal” – Turilli composes musicscapes beyond comparison. While he will never be held to the unattainable standard of a modern Mozart and Beethoven – the giants who receive 100% critical acclaim whether deserved or not – Luca can easily draw comparisons to modern composers like John Williams, Hans Zimmer and Jerry Goldsmith.With his composition company created, his ability to mix both old world classical and modern/new world classical with metallic elements is unprecedented in heavy metal. This music transcends the metal world and thrusts deeply into mainstream music and movie soundtrack lore. On “Prometheus – Symphonia Ignis Divinus” – Turilli uses both dark and light elements, a real combination of “Prophets of the Lost Eclipse” and “The Infinite Wonders of Creation,” to create a stunning masterpiece that trumps the impossibly towering “Ascending to Infinity.”It is literally pointless for fans that do not enjoy meticulously orchestrated cinematic metal to run out to buy “Prometheus,” so just stop right here. Long time Luca fans, read on! Imagine, if you will, being on board the Hollywood backlot tram tour, only its much cooler than you can imagined. As you pass by various sets for movies like “Solomon” (with “King Solomon and the 72 Names of God”) “Lord of the Rings” (with “One Ring to Rule Them All”), “Valhalla Rising” (with “Yggdrasil”) – you are whisked away on a musical journey that is a rich and pure as the breathtaking mountains, valleys, lakes and oceans. Luca creates music that conjures images teaming with life that flash on every note, which is as extraordinary as the breathtaking compositions themselves.After the accident that nearly took the hand and career of guitarist Dominique “Dodo” Leurquin, his presence on “Prometheus” is a both relieving and required. It’s also a welcome sight to see drummer Alex Landenburg (21 Octayne/Mekong Delta), who joined the band before the release of “Ascending Into Infinity” in 2012, but who hasn’t played on a release until “Prometheus.” A favorite skin basher for many years, it’s a triumphant display from one of the best and hardest working in the business. Sound wise…albums do not get much more pristine.With Luca at the helm along with his team of Sebastian Roeder (recording) and Christoph Stickel (mastering) – “Prometheus” is a sonic jewel. Having freed himself from the binding storylines of the pre-split Rhapsody/Rhapsody of Fire days, Luca seems bent on raising the bar with everything he does – becoming part opera, part soundtrack, part metal, part symphony.Where tracks like “Rosenkreuz,” “Prometheus” and “Yggdrasil” ratchet up the heaviness that metalheads expect (notably those fans who have become disillusioned at the orchestrated distractions away from guitar), other songs bring a beautiful “non-metal” element, best represented through “Il Tempo Degli Dei” – which has quickly grown to be the go-to favorite after a mediocre first listen (it sounds immensely happy) – and “Notturno,” the operatic ballad showcasing uber-talented vocalists Alessandro Conti and Fench soprano Emilie Ragni.Once again, the album’s keystone monument is “Of Michael the Archangel and Lucifer’s Fall” – this time with the second part, subtitled “Codex Nemesis.” Remembering greatness levels reaching stupid proportions on “Ascending to Infinity,” the second part matches but comes from a different melodic angle.Overall, “Prometheus - Symphonia Ignis Divinus” ties elements from all of Luca’s previous efforts – with a heavy dose of “Prophet of the Last Eclipse,” nods to the Dreamquest release “Lost Horizons,” and a victory lap from “Ascending to Infinity.” If you are a fan of Turilli, there is little doubt you will gush all over “Prometheus.” If you find the cinematic, operatic and symphonic elements a little too over the top for your metal cravings, then steer clear. One thing is certain, the only composer on earth who can top Luca Turilli is the man himself.Highs: High expectations realized from the world's best composer.Lows: With Luca's Rhapsody, either you find it amazing or way too over the top to be respectable.Bottom line: "Prometheus" may seem like an "Ascending to Infinity" victory lap, but it goes way deeper than what you hear on the first listen." - Metal Underground
    $15.00