The Tale Of Woe ($3 Special)

Excellent US neoprog that will appeal to fans of Marillion and Iluvatar.

Product Review

Red Circle 1
Mon, 2015-10-26 16:28
Rate: 
0
This sadly bears the occasional curse of many Prog bands. It's lead vocalist is really really bad.
Red Circle 1
Mon, 2015-11-16 12:54
Rate: 
0
Sadly marred by less than perfect vocals (far less) this is a band that still could go places with the right singer.
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Product Review

Red Circle 1
Mon, 2015-10-26 16:28
Rate: 
0
This sadly bears the occasional curse of many Prog bands. It's lead vocalist is really really bad.
Red Circle 1
Mon, 2015-11-16 12:54
Rate: 
0
Sadly marred by less than perfect vocals (far less) this is a band that still could go places with the right singer.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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