Stanley Clarke ($5 Blowout Price!)

SKU: EK36973
Label:
Epic
Category:
Fusion
Add to wishlist 

Second solo album from the legendary RTF bassist, originally released in 1974. Its a burning set featuring Jan Hammer and Tony Williams. Oh yeah...a guy name Bill Connors is playing guitar and going off his nut.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • "Finnish power metallers BURNING POINT are an active part of the European Metal scene since the late 90's. Led by mastermind Pete Ahonen, the band has released five studio albums since then, all to critical acclaim. In 2014, Ahonen (who was responsible for vocals and guitars) asked former Battle Beast singer Nitte Valo to join the band as new vocalist. Now the first album with Nitte has been recorded: simply titled 'Burning Point', the CD includes five brand new songs and six BURNING POINT classics in re-recorded versions. It's inevitable to realize that Nitte's presence and unmistakable voice adds the special something to the already established band. BURNING POINT are now bursting of power and motivation. Also, sonically 'Burning Point' is the best sounding album the band has released so far. And seeing this promising new constellation, it is just the beginning with much more to come…"
    $15.00
  • In 1974, Jethro Tull announced plans for WarChild, a multi-faceted project that was to encompass a feature-length film, a soundtrack album, as well a new album from the band. In October of that year, Tull released a 10-song album that would climb to #2 in the U.S. and the top 15 in the U.K., but the film and accompanying soundtrack were shelved. To commemorate the 40-year anniversary of this ambitious experiment, Parlophone revisits WarChild.WARCHILD: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY THEATRE EDITION will be available as a limited edition 2-CD/2-DVD set on November 25 2014.Highlights from the set include:- Original album and bonus tracks (three previously unreleased), remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- 10 orchestral pieces (nine previously unreleased) written for the film s soundtrack, 4 of which are remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- Flat transfers of the original LP mix at 96/24, and the quadrophonic version (with 2 bonus tracks) in 4.0.- The Third Hoorah promo footage, and footage from a January 1974 photo session/press conference where the WarChild project was announced.- An 80-page booklet featuring an extensive history of the project, a film script synopsis, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson, plus rare and unseen photographs.
    $45.00
  • Recorded out in Los Angeles. Not one of their better albums.
    $10.00
  • Official (?) release of a live performance that has been circulating among tape traders for decades.  This was a live in the studio performance recorded for the BBC in 1973 in front of an invited audience.  Its a classic gig that features Wishbone Ash's Andy Powell on Ashes Are Burning along with Al Stewart.
    $14.00
  • First album from these excellent Genesis influenced neoproggers.
    $15.00
  • "Having morphed--some would argue devolved--into a predictable ballad machine by the '80s, it's good to be reminded of Chicago's original artistic ethos and vibrant promise. And what better place to start than their spectacular 1969 debut? This digitally remastered edition compiles the double album on a single disc that retains the original LP artwork and features a 16-page booklet with a retrospective essay (based on new band member interviews) by David Wild. Chicago weren't yet the '70s hit-singles factory they would shortly become, and CTA showcases a band whose muscular musicianship and creative restlessness fostered two LPs worth of music that was as aggressive and far-ranging as its singles were friendly and inviting. Tellingly, the hits showcased here--"Does Anybody Know What Time It Is?" "Beginnings," "Questions 67 and 68," and their rhythmically pumped cover of the Spencer Davis Group's "I'm a Man"--were often edited down from the original collection's suite-heavy structure. But those familiar cuts belie the downright progressive and angular nature of much of the rest, which fuses Terry Kath's neo-psychedelic guitar (which careens to noisy, feedback-laden Hendrixesque extremes on "Free Form Guitar") to one of rock's pioneering horn sections with enough experimentalism ("Poem 58") that it frequently overwhelms their undeniable genius with a pop song. Chicago would seldom sound so adventurous after this, one of rock's greatest debut albums." --Jerry McCulley
    $6.00
  • "This is ROYAL HUNT’s tenth album already? It’s hard to believe, but when you think about it, the band released their first album all the way back in 1992. They should have chosen a better name than “X” though, especially since so many bands have done that before them.This is the second album to feature former Yngwie Malmsteen singer Mark Boals. He did a fine job on their previous album and is one of several great singers that ROYAL HUNT has employed over the years. Their final album with D.C. Cooper, “Paradox,” was one of my favorite albums of all time. Their final album with John West, “Paper Blood,” was excellent as well. However, I hope Boals stays on for at least another album because this one is disappointing.In the months before the album was released, main composer AndrĂ© Andersen stated in several interviews that the band was attempting a more 70s rock sound on this album, which excited me a bit because I love rock music from that era, despite this being different from ROYAL HUNT’s traditional melodic metal sound. However, the results were something more like an 80s rock sound.The guitars are buried, aside from showing up a few times in admittedly solid solos. I admire Andersen’s restraint with the keyboards, but all of the instruments are so simplified that there’s not much to stand out besides Boals’ vocals. Boals does a fine job with the material he’s given, particularly on “End of the Line” and “The Well,” but unfortunately he cannot make this a magnificent album on his own. There are still a good amount of pleasurable songs, but nothing approaching the heights that I know this band is capable of.“X” shows ROYAL HUNT breaking relatively new ground, but it sounds much different than advertised. There are still some fine moments, but overall this is somewhat disappointing. This is probably still worth hearing, it just won’t end up on my best of 2010 list any time soon." - Metal Temple
    $12.00
  • Essential jazz fusion effort from Herbie Hancock's post-Miles Davis ensemble. Comes in a nice digipak. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Limited edition 2CD set includes a live set recorded at Buxton Opera House."The bleak setting of BJH’s first album in 14 years – and their first since Woolly Wolstenholme cut his life short – evokes rumination on the times when the harvesting is done and one is to gather stones. That’s how the things are set in motion with a tiredly flowing “If You Were Here” until its pining ennui takes a vertiginous turn at the song’s end, when John Lees’ voice starts spinning from channel to channel for the listener to land on familiar ground which hasn’t been trodden for so long. Nor for nothing the record’s cover features a scenic view from the Northern parish of Saddleworth where the group come from.Once on terra firma, the band’s patented sense of humor kicks in, too, and the riff of “The Real Deal” casts rocks far enough, with “it’a a long way back” argument, to convince yer olde fan the album is exactly what this track’s title suggests, yet even those who’ve been following BJH for four decades won’t be prepared for the brass-brandishing “On Top Of The World” that makes the homecoming glorious. Anxious love pours out of the record’s title piece depicting local landscapes and the twangy memory-lane emotions, but the album is as ancient as it is modern.Thus, the slow boogie “In Wonderland” satirizes today’s ways of communication, with web acronyms thrown in for a chorus, and alloys the slang use of “schmetterling” with the ensemble’s symbol: a butterfly. Such an integrity lurks also in the alliteration between “North” and its predecessor, “Nexus,” as well as in the literary appropriation of Saddleworth’s Ammon Wrigley’s poem for the parting that is “The End Of the Day” wherein the gods of Ale and Mirth give birth to a child which can be a child of the universe, an important part of BJH’s lore. It’s elegiac rather than jolly, though, but Jez Smith’s piano in “Ancient Waves” and Lees’ guitar render this melancholy warm and delicate, while, for all its twilight shimmer, the 9-minute “On Leave” – surely a Woolly tribute – joins the pantheon of the band’s best ballads, whereas the quiet communal merriment fills the folk lustre of “Unreservedly Yours” that oozes the ultimate, if autumnal, dedication.With the parallel existence of another BJH, featuring Les Holroyd, “North” could have been a simple attempt of reclaiming the legacy; instead, it turns out to be a shining addition to the classic canon." - Let It Rock
    $17.00
  • Second album from this superb Italian prog metal band. Long out of print, this new edition is remastered and features four bonus tracks including the original Japanese bonus track, two demos from 1993 and a rehearsal version of "Erase" from 2006. Limited edition of 3,000 copies comes housed in a slipcase and has a poster. One of the killers!
    $12.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • This Swedish doomsters does an uncanny job of channeling 70s dark hard rock sounds.  Black Sabbath comes to mind instantly and you'll hear some similarities to bands like Pentagram and Candlemass.  This time around they have opened up their sound a bit - I distinctly hear more than a little bit of Zep inscribed in their genome.  Highly recommended.
    $13.00
  • "Accept's creative breakthrough, 1983's Restless and Wild, begins with one of the most unexpected, surprising, and hilarious mock intros ever recorded. Untold thousands no doubt furrowed their brows in confusion at the perky German folk song emanating from their speakers, only to be rudely interrupted by a scratching needle and Udo Dirkschneider's incomparable shriek, as the band launch themselves into the stunning violence of "Fast as a Shark." Not just a thrilling, light-speed juggernaut, the song was probably the last thrash metal prototype waxed in the pre-thrash era (officially inaugurated by Metallica's Kill 'Em All a few months later). Though nowhere near as frenetic, the title track and "Ahead of the Pack" are just as fierce, and despite a sudden stumble with the mediocre "Shake Your Heads" (an overtly cheesy, Judas Priest-style metal anthem, and the album's only stinker), the dramatic "Neon Nights" ends side one on the upswing once again. As for the album's second half, it's pretty much beyond reproach. Introduced by the solid "Get Ready" (another nod to Priest with its "Living After Midnight"-inspired drum intro), it builds from strength to strength with increasingly mature and melodic (though lyrically obscure) tracks such as "Flash Rockin' Man," "Don't Go Stealing My Soul Away," and the colossal "Princess of the Dawn." The latter closes the album as it began, in unexpected fashion, when its extended outro is abruptly interrupted mid-verse. The bottom line here is that this, like its successor Balls to the Wall, is an essential heavy metal album, and any fan worth his salt should own them both. But for the sake of first-time visitors, Restless and Wild is the slightly grittier, less melodic of the two. Whichever you chose, you can only win." - All Music Guide
    $5.00