Seventh Sojourn (Remaster)

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  • Love the Mellotron?  Well have we got an album for you...Many years ago we reissued the 1971 release from this British progressive band.  Originally released on the RCA Neon label it achieved mythic status because there were 3 Mellotron players listed (turned out to be one Mellotron and a few of the band members played it).  Prices for original albums soared into the stratosphere.  We set out on our quest to bring Spring into the digital age.  As it turned out it was actually quite easy and we had the full participation of the lead singer Pat Moran.  For many years it was one of our most succesful releases but ultimately went out of print.  Since then it has reappeared on various labels - all using our CD as their source materials.Now we have a new visitiation by Esoteric Recordings who have not only gone back to the original source tapes but have successfully done what we were unable to - they have uncovered the tapes for the unreleased second album.The second album featured a slightly different lineup.  The Mellotron was gone and largely subplanted with organ.  Even still it was obviously Spring through and through.  So you now have the complete works of Spring: the first album, three non-lp tracks, plus a complete second album.  Of course expect the usual great booklet filled with all kinds of unknown facts culled from the late Pat Moran's diaries.Highest recommendation.  BUY OR DIE! 
    $15.00
  • "The Moody Blues returned after a five year hiatus with a very different sounding album. The punk and disco era were now in full flower and such groups as Styx, Journey, and REO Speedwagon were dominating the rock charts. Octave would abandon the cosmic and symphonic sound of the group’s past, and move toward one more in tune with the era. As such it would not stand out as a unique creation as did their core of classic albums.Octave would also be the last album for founding member Mike Pinder. He had always provided a spiritual and in many ways the classical center of their music through his mellotron and chamberlin. Now playing a synthesizer the sound was different and not as grand. Years later it would come to light that he was not pleased with the musical direction of the group. Patrick Moraz would replace him as the group’s keyboardist and tour in support of the album.Octave would have no unifying theme and be the most diffuse album that The Moody Blues had released up until that time. Each song would match the individual personality of its composer.The John Lodge composition, “Steppin’ In A Slide Zone,” was typical of the new sound. It is a typical energetic Lodge rocker but the musical center was the keyboard-guitar interplay which was in vogue at the time. Still it was catchy and was a commercially successful single.Justin Hayward is in ballad mode for this release and while he would not create anything as wonderful or unique as “Nights In White Satin,” his music is still very listenable because of the innate beauty of the songs. “Had To Fall In Love” and “Top Rank Suite” are both very mellow. “Driftwood” is the best of the three as it is a gentle love ballad which was a Hayward trademark by this time.Ray Thomas created two songs for this release. “I’m Your Man” just disappears but “Under Moonshine” contains a strong lead vocal by him plus some classic harmonies by the other members of the group.“One Step Into The Light” would be a final spiritual statement by Mike Pinder and his only composition on the album. The music would be more progressive rock than the grandiose sound of his past as he would bring his Moody Blues career to a conclusion.A fourth Justin Hayward song would close the album. “The Day We Meet Again” would unintentionally or intentionally point toward the future as a new keyboardist was on the way and the grand classical sounds were being left behind.Make no mistake, Octave remains a very good late seventies album but does fall short of the group’s best work. It was different, more modern, and ultimately a transitional work. Despite all that it still remains a good, if not essential, Moody Blues listen today." - Blogcritics.org
    $9.00
  • "Digitally remastered and expanded edition of the original stereo mix of this 1969 classic from the UK Pop/Prog pioneers featuring five bonus tracks:'Gypsy' (Full Version), 'Candle Of Life' (Full Version), 'Sun Is Still Shining' (Alternate Mix), 'Have You Heard' (David Symonds BBC Radio One Concert) and 'Legend Of A Mind' (David Symonds BBC Radio One Concert). Previously released as an SACD disc, this regular CD issue features sleeve notes and rare photographs. 18 tracks. "
    $10.00
  • Superb remaster features extensive liner notes and unreleased bonus tracks.
    $15.00
  • From beginning to end their best (and probably proggiest) album. Masterpiece.
    $15.00
  • Superb remaster features extensive liner notes and 2 unreleased bonus tracks.
    $15.00
  • "Steve Thorne returns with his fourth album, playing the majority of the instruments bar Nick D’Virgilio (Cirque Du Soleil/ex-Spock’s Beard) and Bob White on drums with Tony Levin and Gary Chandler (Jadis) also guesting. Also former IQ member Martin Orford pops out of musical retirement to play flute on two songs.What I like about Steve Thorne is his strong and topical lyrics, coupled with melodies that transcend the prog rock genre he is often lumped in. A bit like It Bites, Steve Thorne’s music can take in many musical influences to create an entertaining and enjoyable listen.‘Already Dead’ looks at modern culture and how modern technology can turn us into a nation of zombies. Good way to start the album with the heaviest and most aggressive song on the album. ‘Everything Under The Sun’ is a lovely piece of music, albeit rather sad as an older person looks back on their life and realises how alone they are now. The melodic vocal and subdued music add greatly to the song. ‘Distant Thunder’ is the nearest to classic Brit prog rock on the album, whilst Martin Orford’s flute expands the sound of ‘Moth To A Flame’ nicely. ‘Bullets & Babies’ again sees the heavier side of Steve Thorne’s work come to the fore tackling the subject of boy soldiers and how war affects people from an early age.An artist where you can start with any of his albums to date and not be disappointed. As mentioned previously Steve Thorne can appeal to the prog rock fans but also a wider audience who appreciate melodic rock with thought provoking lyrics." - Get Ready To Rock
    $6.00
  • Brief Nocturnes is the band's 11th album.  It marks their return to Inside Out and quite frankly its the best album they have released in a very long time.  Chalk it up to Ted Leonard handling vocals or Neal Morse contributing writing to a couple of tunes?  Not sure.  I am definitely hearing more vitality and overt progginess in the compositions.  Ryo is going off his nut here - keys are whizzing all around - organ/'tron/the whole schmear - and Alan's guitar runs are matching him step for step.  Maybe I haven't been paying attention as closely as I should have for the past few years.  I do know that I'm enjoying the hell out of this.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • Excellent remaster of one of the greatest mellotron albums of all time! Not even sure where to begin as this album is loaded with masterpiece after masterpiece. Comes with an unreleased track as a bonus cut.
    $17.00
  • With Geoff Downes splitting to reform the original lineup of Asia the current Asia members decided to carry on. GPS finds vocalist/bassist John Payne, guitarist Guthrie Govan, and drummer Jay Schellen augmented by Spock's Beard keyboardist Ryo Okumoto. Musically speaking it doesn't depart too greatly from the Asia formula with one exception which I'll get to in a moment. This is melodic, prog-inflected AOR plain and simple. What I find to be better about GPS as opposed to Asia is that I think Okumoto is a far better soloist than Downes, who I never thought had much in the way of flash. Okumoto injects the prog element that the music needs, offering up some exceptional solos (for my taste he's always been the strongest instrumentalist in SB). Nevertheless don't come here looking for a prog extravaganza. It only deviates from the formula slightly. If you are an Asia fan you're in! Funny thing - when I look at the cover I immediately think of a young Lee Sklar, the long bearded bassist that toured with Phil Collins, et al.
    $14.00
  • The double disc hard back 32 page book comes with lots of extras, including the complete remix of the album, extra bonus tracks and a DVD featuring live video footage of material from ‘Tales’ along with a host of MP3 files, original mixes, audio commentary and previously unreleased writing/rehearsal/demo material. The full track listing for the CD/DVD edition is: CD:
 • The Last Human Gateway
 • Through The Corridors (Oh! Shit Me) • Awake And Nervous
 • My Baby Treats Me Right ‘Cos I’m A Hard Lovin’ Man All Night Long
 • The Enemy Smacks 2013 remix by Michael Holmes 
Engineered by Rob Aubrey Bonus tracks
: • Wintertell (2012 recording) • The Last Human Gateway (end section, alternative vocals) • Just Changing Hands (unfinished demo)
 • Dans Le Parc du Château Noir (unfinished demo) DVD: 
• The Last Human Gateway • Through The Corridors (Oh! Shit Me) 
• About Lake Five / Awake And Nervous • The Enemy Smacks 
(Live at De Boerderij, Zoetermeer, Holland: October 23, 2011) • Photo Gallery (contemporary photos and artwork) • DIY Mix of ‘Through The Corridors': multi-track audio files and mixing software MP3 files:
 • ‘Tales From The Lush Attic’ (original mix: August 1983) 
• Seven Stories into Eight (original cassette album) • Tales from the Lush Attic - audio commentary by Peter and Mike Further listening:
 • The Enemy Smacks (first attempts: November 1982) • 
The Last Human Gateway (writing session: February 1983)
 • Just Changing Hands (instrumental demo: February 1983)
 • Just Changing Hands (rehearsal: February 11, 1983)
 • Wintertell (demo: July 1983)
 • The Last Human Gateway (first complete version - rehearsal: July 27, 1983) 
• Unused idea version 1 (rehearsal: August 1983) • 
Unused idea version 2 (rehearsal: August 1983)
 • Hollow Afternoon (demo, original lyrics: 1983) 
• Just Changing Hands (Cava demo: 1984)
 • The Last Human Gateway (middle section) (1991 recording)
    $25.00
  • "Aria is the second collaboration of ASIA founder Geoff Downes and singer/bass player John Payne. On Aria, John Payne’s voice is more powerful than ever and every single track is a massive thunderclap. As a special feature the Aria Special Edition contains the video for the song Anytime. The cover artwork was done by the legendary Roger Dean (Yes, Uriah Heep) and the album has been digitally remastered."
    $14.00