Rubycon

SKU: 724384006327
Label:
Virgin
Category:
Electronic
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Rubycon was the follow up to Phaedra and was also a success.  It wasn't as dark an ominous as its predecessor but the two side long tracks as classic examples of sequencer based electronic music.  You dig Mellotron?  Froese is all over it on this album.  Amazing stuff.

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  • "When in 1975 Larry Coryell went on tour with his short-lived all-star group The Eleventh House, the jazz-rock scene had just reached its climax. Although Larry is considered by many historians to be one of the first to melt jazz with rock, he never entered the rostrum as winner (one could guess, that his 'mistake' was not to be in any of the Miles Davis groups).With this recording this might change in retrospect. Very few acts of that era were that powerful. Hymns, simple hit melodies, funk grooves, blues rock guitar, 70ies synth sounds, and a lot of fun and entertainment were the ingredients of a concert evening to be remembered. The material chosen was like 'The Best of the Eleventh House'. While many other fusion protagonists with a jazz background used rock, blues, and funk elements, thinking this might make their music more accessible (some slipping towards easy listening, others were just unable to create a rock feeling), Larry Coryell & the Eleventh House used all these styles at well-balanced eye level.Recorded live January 18, 1975 at Post-Aula, Bremen, Germany" 
    $21.00
  • 2CD edition comes with a bonus live disc recorded at the Loud Park 2010 festival."Taking a cue from where post-psychedelic and hard rock left off in the seventies before our hard rock heroes either went disco or into questionable directions, Spiritual Beggars’ picks up the pieces, just like Grunge did in its heyday; but adding a little more balls to the mix as an authentic force to be reckoned with. A supergroup featuring members of Arch Enemy, Opeth, Firewind, Carcass, and other extensions, the amped up sound of this Swedish powerhouse throws the pretentious mannerisms of out of the mix, gaining them a status that has created a solid dichotomy between them and many other stoner rock bands.Even as these guys are native to extreme and symphonic metal bands, the tunage gets to the point, reflecting Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Blue Oyster Cult and early-Priest, as the heavy blues & R&B flavored upbeat moods have always raised the roof. Inflamed by grinding riffage and screaming Hammond organ, Earth Blues again sees Spiritual Beggars taking no retreat from their enigmatic rock and roll feast. The opening track “Wise as a Serpent” immediately spurs the dark groove into power pop territories, yet more intricate sides are heard on the multi-faceted “Sweet Magic Pain” & the dark 1-2 punch of “Kingmaker,” both offering up a salvo of to a Sabotage-meets-Agents of Fortune attitude. Without reckless abandon, these guys also explore a psych/funk mindset on “Turn the Tide,” plus you have “One Man’s Curse” which could have been a long last tune from Come Taste the Band.Even on the ballad “Dreamer” and the low key rocker “Dead End Town,” the band flexes their ideology the same way Zeppelin did at times; and that ideology is further expressed by way of  a set of live tracks on a bonus disc, proving they can hit the road with the attitude to kick ass. Still, whatever way you hear Spiritual Beggars, there will be no denying that their solid foundation of hard rock possesses intrigue, forgoing all the poser musicianship and letting the songs, the true grit of emotion, and the conviction to simply rock out speak loud for Earth Blues. Heavy, commanding, & sophisticated, Spiritual Beggars continue to map out their presence with bold, sharp, & gripping, metallic grandeur, affording no shame whatsoever." - Ytsejam.com
    $14.00
  • "The sophomore effort from the extraordinary drummer Sebastiaan Cornelissen featuring an all-star lineup - guitarists Alex Machacek, Mike Otram, Susan Weinert, Richard Hallebeek; keyboardists Gary Husband, Scott Kinsey, and Steve Hunt; and bassists Hadrien Feraud, Jimmy Earl, Gary Willis, and Tom Kennedy among others. Since first coming on the scene in the early 2000s, composer and drummer Sebastiaan Cornelissen has emerged as one of the most distinctive new voices on the European fusion scene. Whether acting as a leader, sideman, or group member, Cornelissen's playing combines a sharp sense of empathy and staggering technique with impressive improvisational grace and intensity."
    $8.00
  • The band's second album now remastered and featuring two bonus tracks.
    $8.00
  • Latest studio album from this lethal German band.  SBE was formed by guitarist Christian Peters in 2007.  The quartet (twin guitar, bass, and drums) will deeply satisfy the musicial appetite of any fans of 70s psychedelia, space rock, and doom metal.  They may well be the ultimate stoner rock band.Revelation & Mystery finds the compositions a bit tighter than previous efforts but that's a relative term when the title track runs past the 12 minute mark. Vocals don't interfere too heavily with the acid laced space trippin' guitar work.  Peters sings a bit and then they get down to serious business jamming their way into the cosmos.  If you are fan of early Guru Guru, Hawkwind, and Black Sabbath, or even Deep Purple you need to hear this band.  I got high just looking at the cover art.  This album is a total lease breaker to boot.  BUY OR DIE!  "The second album from Samsara Blues Experiment in as many years, Revelation and Mystery (World in Sound) takes a surprising turn in approach from their Long-Distance Trip debut, distilling the jams of the first record into more structured, song-based material. The tracks of Revelation and Mystery almost exclusively follow verse-chorus-verse patterns, and while part of the joy of listening to a song like “Singata Mystic Queen” from the prior collection was meandering along with it, Samsara Blues Experiment don’t completely lose sight of the journey in favor of the straightforward. Right from its start, Revelation and Mystery sees the four-piece layering guitar effects and infusing their parts with swirls and a spaced-out feel. It’s not that they’ve completely changed their methodology so much as they’ve shifted the balance within their sound. These structural elements were certainly present on Long-Distance Trip, but a cut like the semi-acoustic “Thirsty Moon” shows that Samasara Blues Experiment are able to work within these parameters to grow their songwriting. One gets the sense in listening to opener “Flipside Apocalypse” (which follows a 17-second nameless intro track) that this process is just beginning and that the band are still finding out what they want their sound to be, but that only makes Revelation and Mystery a more immediate, direct experience; the linearity of the album unfolding gradually as the songs move from the straightforward into the more sublimely jammed.Fast-paced rumbling from the bass of Richard Behrens in the surprisingly punkish beginning of “Flipside Apocalypse” is an immediate clue to the changes the last year have brought about in Samsara Blues Experiment. The mood is more active, less calming and chilled out than last time around, and the guitars of Hans Eiselt and Christian Peters – who also handles vocals – seem to be more concerned with riffing out than stacking layers upon layers, though there’s some of that too, even as later in the song a riff straight out of the biker rock milieu shows up and carries the song through to its end. I don’t know if it’s the result in some change in the band’s songwriting process or just how things happened to come out this time, but the change continues through “Hangin’ on the Wire,” which is genuinely hooky and thoroughly in the realm of heavy rock. A crisp production during the solo section brings to mind some of Queens of the Stone Age’s finer moments, and drummer Thomas Vedder locks in with Behrens’ own excellent fills with a few of his own. Peters, though, emerges at the head of the song. His vocals confident and effected in equal measure, he works quickly to establish the verse and chorus patterns, both worthy of sing-alongs, so that by the end, “Hangin’ on the Wire” feels like its earned its handclaps, and though “Into the Black” starts out more ethereal, with extended solo sections and a long instrumental introduction, the shuffle soon takes hold and it proves to be more boogie than nod.But perhaps “Into the Black” is where the band begins their subtle shift into more esoteric sonics, because as the soft strums and plucks and interplay of electric and acoustic guitars take hold on “Thirsty Moon,” the song feels neither out of place nor especially unexpected, which it very well might have if placed earlier on Revelation and Mystery. Peters’ vocal line feels a little rushed during the verse – it’s almost as though there were too many syllables to fit in the line – but the interaction of his and Eiselt’s guitars in the instrumental break and the balance between the guitar and Vedder’s drumming in the mix makes up for any such hiccups. Another chorus feels delivered more appropriately, and the progression cycles through again; solo section into chorus, solo section into chorus. And it’s not until Behrens’ highlight bass line begins “Outside Insight Blues” that it’s apparent just how much Samsara Blues Experiment put into the album’s flow. Added keys allow the guitars to go farther out into sporadic notes without sacrificing fullness of sound, but after about two and a half minutes, there’s a turn into riffier material that carries the groove through the next six. There are a few part changes, but things don’t really feel jammed out until the classic ‘70s boogie meets psychedelia of the last 90 seconds or so, blues harp and all. It’s a shift worthy of Siena Root, and the two-minute interlude “Zwei Schatten im Schatten” (in English, “Two Shadows in the Shadow”) follows suit with an appropriate marriage of Eastern and Western musical traditions with sitar and acoustic six-string. There’s something sweet and solemn in the intertwining melody, and it’s a passing thing on the way to the 12-minute closer, but worth paying attention to in a way that many interludes aren’t.Then, at last, comes the ending title cut. Worthy of its name, “Revelation and Mystery” caps the album with a sense of psychedelic majesty through which Samsara Blues Experiment show their ability to keep hold of a song no matter how deep into space they might also want to push it. The song winds. Its progression is at once driving and subdued, and of all the songs on Revelation and Mystery, it’s probably the best blend of all sides of what’s shown itself to be the band’s current sound. Of course, at 12 minutes, one could easily argue it has time to do and be all these things – with room left over for a bit of that sitar to show up as well among the guitar leads – but still, it’s another display of the maturity Samsara Blues Experiment have been able to take on in a relatively short amount of time (their demo gave first notice in 2008). Some bands need three years to learn and foster growth between their albums, and some bands need to play. If the jump between their first and second records is anything to go by, Samsara Blues Experiment would seem to be the latter. Wherever this stylistic form takes them, I don’t imagine it’ll be too long before we find out, but until then, the 47 minutes of Revelation and Mystery provide a varied and exciting listen worthy of repeat visits. Samsara Blues Experiment continue to progress, continue to impress." - The Obelisk
    $12.00
  • Remastered Edition.
    $12.00
  • "The beauty of Progressive music is the myriad of ways by which it may be approached by listeners and musicians alike. The Danish quartet ANUBIS GATE are soon to release their 6th album, “Horizons”, the first album without long-time members Morten Sørensen and Jesper M. Jensen, and doing well to stay with long-time producer Jacob Hansen. New members Morten Gade and Michael Bodin offer their exceptional instrumental skills in the mix. With “Horizons”, we see a continuation, albeit tangential, from the major turning point that was the self-titled album. With this release, one can expect the darkly melodic-melancholic and song-oriented Progressive music they have since become known for. As much as I loved the self-titled album, “Horizons” tops it in almost every way.“Never Like This” is exemplary of the band's ambitious, but inevitably excellent and evocative songwriting, that fuses liquid but hard-hitting riffs and airy, creative melodic work. Henrik expands his vocals here quite significantly, his immense range travelling from spectrum to spectrum and delivering catchy hooks in a deliciously Jazzy fashion. Coming from Pop roots, he offers something unique and tangible to the Metal table.  “Hear My Call” is my favorite track here; I was instantly hooked, even months ago, hearing just snippets on teasers. A deceptively heavy, yet groovy intro riff, drives the majority of the song, with yet again a creative display of melodic progressions. The chorus is delightful, with Henrik showing a soaring facet to his vocal repertoire. Both guitarists possess a unique ability to seamlessly transcend between the heavy and melodic in an instant, which is sudden and followable at the same time.Of course, “A Dream Within A Dream” requires a mention; their longest track, at 14 minutes it even surpasses “The End of Millennium Road”, but similarly combines an array of amorphous soundscapes. It also continues a neat little trick I have noticed the band perform, where certain lyrical passages would link back to previous tracks; such occurred with “Ammonia Snow” on “The Detached”. The highlight is the delicious passage demonstrated on the recent teaser, displaying a symbiotic melody between Henrik's bass and his vocals. “Erasure” is a surprising and very enjoyable acoustic piece that garnishes the end of the album. As opposed to the ballad “Ammonia Snow”, this track features predominantly acoustic guitars and a dramatic crash of distorted electric that breaks up any potential monotony. Did I mention the hauntingly beautiful lyrics?It is repressively hard not to ramble on about Progressive music with such surreal, engaging properties. In the end, any expectations I had of this release were not met, but blown away. The year is young, but it is already in my proverbial, annual top 10." - Metal Temple
    $12.00
  • Back in the days when I was a young pup I used to get mail order lists of used and rare albums from dealers in Germany. There was one album that was soooo expensive that I couldn't fathom anyone ever buying it. Funny thing is it always sold. That album was Ainigma. I never heard it (I could never afford it!!) until some years ago when it was reissued by the German label Little Wing Of Refugees. That edition is long out of print. This new version on Garden Of Delights is up to their usual standards - detailed liner notes and photos as well as bonus material. So what's the deal? Why so rare and is it any good? It's rare for the obvious reasons - small private press vs. collector demand. Fortunately the damn thing turned to be a pretty good disc. Ainigma released this album in 1973. The band was a trio consisting of Willi Kluter (keys, vocals), Wolfgang Netzer (guitar, bass), and Michael Kluter (drums). It's not exactly a hi-fidelity recording, perhaps lending somewhat to it's charm. Ripping fuzz guitar and distored organ solos are everywhere - drawing similarities to bands like Bodkin, Bram Stoker and Fuzzy Duck except the tracks are very lengthy. Vocals are "ok" but don't detract at all. The standout is obvious - the side long title track. This one slams! If you like that underground sound you can't get much better.
    $18.00
  • Limited digipak edition with one bonus track."Fourteen years. Fourteen years have already passed, since Morten Veland departured from one of the most prominent and praised gothic metal acts of its time, Tristania, and decided to further develop and portray his talent and visions in Sirenia. If you are like me and have followed them since the beginning to the point where we are now, then this is definitely one of these moments when we realize how quickly time passes by, wouldn't you agree? What has happened in these fourteen years? An amazing debut At Sixes And Sevens, its noteworthy successor And An Elixir For Existence and a few albums, which divide the band's fan base: some more loved, other less, but all bearing the typical Sirenia characteristics. A few line-up changes happened in the course of the years as well, but since 2011 the band has been a steady quintet and I'm guessing the stability and energy between the band members has to do something with the fact that since 2011's The Enigma Of Life, which I consider to be the lowest point of Sirenia's repertoire, the band has again turned the page and decided, reaching a low point is something they should accept and – ascend. The recruit of Ailyn, who joined the band in 2008 as a lead female singer obviously was more than a good idea, because she is the longest running of all female vocalists who ever stood in front of the microphone of the band and has shared notable seven years with them. Speaking of sevens, whether it is a coincidence or not (and I do not believe in coincidences), that The Seventh Life Path is the band's seventh full length album and the sevens continuously appear in Veland's tracks – "Seven Sirens And A Silver Tear" (An Elixir For Existence), "Seven Keys And Nine Doors" (Nine Destinies And A Downfall), "The Seventh Summer" and "Sirens Of The Seven Seas" (both on The 13th Floor) and "Seven Widows Weep" (Perils Of The Deep Blue) - to go through them all, I am not sure. But it is a number of mystery and magic, a number which finds its place in fairy tales and legends as well as mythology and religion and the seventh Sirenia album is, believe it or not, just as mysterious and spellbound as the number.  Whilst the typical melodic, rhythmic and groovy guitar riffing, beautifully combined and enhanced by the use of choirs, powerful orchestrations, delightful piano melodies and stunning Ailyn's clean vocals, counterpoised by Morten's profound growls, still build the core of The Seventh Life Path, its beauty lies in incorporating various elements of different metal styles and thus its explorative, even a bit experimental and pompous nature. The opening intro track "Seti" is a nice ambient setter, which takes you on the darkest path and the frightening and threatening choirs let you know you are in for something big: something incredibly obscure, flamboyant and majestic. The compositions on The Seventh Life Path are yet again very dense and rich, as they ooze strange, strained, sharp, intense, wretched and venomous atmosphere and you get just that with the following "Serpent", a highly tenebrous and ghastly song, which emits a deranged and vile ambiance, a bit similar of what we already heard in Tristania's "Opus Relinque" or "Heretique" from their 1999 album Beyond The Veil. Not only musically, but a great part in building that sensations are Ailyn's graceful vocals and again she has proved she keeps evolving: she lightly shifts from sounding like insane witch, beautiful enchantress, raging fury or a fragile siren so effortlessly and with Morten's opposing growls they are creating the typical beauty and the beast play of vocals. Not only by using the two typical vocal techniques, which contradict each other, but because they are interacting as they are telling us a story and thus add a special, very dramatic and almost theatrical effect, which intensifies the sound to the maximum.Similarly, the grandiose epicenes is probably most notable in a more than eight minute lasting epopee "Sons Of The North", an incredible track, that pushes the sound of Sirenia even further by incorporating avant-garde metal features – when you come half-way along the song a mad intermezzo, with incredibly haunting atmosphere breaks the song’s dynamics and descends into a massive, twisted sensation and so it even heightens the sombre and asphyxiating ambient. "The Silver Eye" brings yet another surprise with its almost fast-paced and abrupt beginning, which really shows Sirenia peered themselves into far more aggressive realms, we were used to. On the other hand, The Seventh Life Path also offers some catchy and melodic tunes, for example in "Elixir", a song, which somehow flows in the vein of currently popular trancecore a wee bit and last but not least, delivers some very classical sirenian tunes, for instance in a ravishing and elegiac ballad "Tragedienne" or a classical gothic/symphonic tune, filled with typical Veland-ish guitars and powerful choirs in a bittersweet "Once My Light" and "Concealed Disdain".To be honest, I was a bit reserved with this album, simply because I had no idea what to expect, but I can honestly say this is not only an album for the devoted Sirenia fan base, but also for anyone looking a wonderful combination of prime gothic metal and symphonic metal grandeur. The Seventh Life Path was far more than I expected it to be, simply because it depicts a step further in Sirenia's sound and I had never even imagined they would go for exploring and expanding their well-established sound by going into more tense and intense waters, into even more complex and enhanced compositions and stygian atmosphere. With this release Veland has completely mastered his ability to perfectly equilibrate all those various elements and portray them into a whole different, so much more vigorous, ferocious and emotional manner; poured his entire soul into this work of art and perfected the interpretation of musical compositions and song-writing. The divine and darkened harmonies on this album result in an esoteric, edgy, mesmerizing and hellacious album, which at the same time offers a tremendous emotional burdened and at the same time story-telling aestheticism." - Terra Relicta
    $13.00
  • In Crescendo is the fourth studio album from this Italian progressive band.  While originally working in a purely metal direction, the band has expanded the scope of their sound to encompass elements of progressive rock as well.  There is a very strong atmospheric component similar to Riverside, Porcupine Tree, and Pink Floyd but the heavier, metallic side of Opeth and Dream Theater is clearly present as well.Over the past two years Kingcrow has expanded their fan base with a European tour in support of Redemption and Jon Oliva as well as appearances at ProgPower Europe and ProgPower USA.  An announcement about 2013 US tour dates is imminent. 
    $13.00
  • Third and best album from this seminal Italian prog band. Originally Delirium was led by flautist/vocalist Ivano Fossati, who left after the first album and went on to a significant career in Italy as a pop singer (still going strong today). His replacement was Englishman Martin Grice who not only played flute but sax as well. In addition to Grice's great work you get some killer organ and Mellotron. The sax/organ interplay reminds a bit of VDGG and there is an obvious Tull influence at play as well. Nicely remastered and repackaged in a mini-lp sleeve.
    $20.00
  • "Peter Frohmader is bound to his "Nekropolis" visions, by being both the ultimate artist, even when rich names and artists help around with composition ideas and groans or settle or diverse the mood of those vision, and the first in line to be absorbed by "Nekropolis"'s brand of imagination, impulse and histrionic character, launching and spiraling around the project for a lot of his rich and contentious desire and impact of music. The sense of "Nekropolis", coming from the physical choice and adventure of the bare project, helped him and disguised him as the artist very marked by avant-garde and experimental music, doing also a bit of jazz and hard rock, plus taking the progressive steps of complex music movingly literal - but, essentially, once he settled in electronic "mashterings" (the 80s's sunrise, most lately), it gives him the mask of a soundoholic artist, with lots of hard and hypnotic, technical and disturbed spirit in the genre. It is even an alluded thought that, among some clear and unmovable essential albums, the Nekropolis projects reflects a dynamic, endless and astounding part of Frohmader's artistic concentration and abscond psych-vision, throughout full sessions that may, at most, seem too undifferentiated (and without a complaisant feeling in them), nevertheless obtain a powerful music in a dark lock of genuine or dissimilar orientation.Nekropolis 2 is the first-rated and best to recommended from the early Nekropolis project and emphasis, one that included a first volume in 1981, plus four mini-sessions Frohmader made even before his classic debut. If the size of the Nekropolis project ambition becomes needless to describe, each album, and Nekropolis 2 most precisely, has an independent layer and focus - even if the tendency is to called Frohmader the dark sage or the sound-rash visceral artist in most of everything that makes sense in his music.The part extravagant part aleatory indite of Nekropolis 2 makes it an album of "soundtracks" and sound-forms, produced under a collaboration and a visual-motivation with H.R. Giger, who paintings celebrate (or must celebrate) the same dark affinity and rhetorical art as Frohmader's engines of electronic and improvised music. Similar to the whole idea of electronic nekro-vision and codification, we can relate how the grave artist Lustmord will combine the visual with the soundscape, the brutal flesh of a particular idea with the difficult sound of that idea's interpreted essence. Robert Rich and other ambientists try something in this particular movement too, but not so amazingly. As music, what I can't link is the classic scorches of artists like Kluster or Amon Duul, because it is simply of a different quality and a new homegrown effort. At least not by Nekropolis 2's chaotic and phantasmal installment.Nine pieces are squeezed in two sides of an LP (I don't know for sure how limited has this album become, but a second year of release, 2001, made a benefical treat), all nine treating, psychologically and exasperatingly, sound experiments, screeches of impulses and blind movements, independent tastes and difficult to compel umbers and embers of electronic poly-morphic expressions. This album becomes strong, even terrifying, to much of the valorous impressions, even considering those that experience the clash of kraut rock and noise amphitheatric constructions. The style oscillates madly between electronic, dark ambient, rock and even goth-impelled music personality, since a lot of instrument power is used, Frohmader adopting a multi-instrumental implosion: from Rhodes to guitars, from waves to machinist impulses, from vibrations to an actually absent but credited vocal-infliction. It's a sort of humongous contracting and contrasting work-load, creating the 'simple' arrangements of experimental and avant-demonic electronic moves.You can hardly associate the drastic music with anything but Frohmader's own neoplastic explosion of atonality and micro-experimentalism, under the heavy preach of electronic use and abuse. A few moments try some rhythm or some dubbed ambiance, but such thoughts are quickly forgotten, and the style returns to the blend of musical dark forces and electronic technical virtues. The best sounds are obtained not by finding the simplest experimental mix, but by actually building up a sinister monolith of musical flux and interference. The dark and impossible shrieks become a side of evil art Frohmader mostly resumes as electronic stability. Beyond the sugestive names (Hardcorps,Neutronen Symphonie), there is a continuous avalanche of rough and systematically incinerating sound systems, forcing the deepest mind to gasp an exclamation - or to collapse under the pressure.Nekropolis 2 is not one of the most essential and perfect Frohmader compositions, but it tends to dangerously play with the biggest details of his grandest styles, in a way that it actually is simply one project of dark-experimental electronic impeach from many others. Tonic and technically valorous, this, much like anything by the artist, goes for those lovers of unconventional and harsh art. It is, however,a good example of the electronic 80s not being flask, but having their own kind of absurdity and gloat-impressionable art." - ProgArchives
    $8.00
  • "Originally released in 1979, these recordings show the first solo efforts by formerly Aera leader, guitar player and composer Muck Groh. But in fact this album wasnt a solo album but could be described at the third Aera album of Aeras first decade line-up. All those great musicians like sax player Klaus Kreuzeder, drummer Wolfgang Teske, violinist Christoph Krieger and a lot of guest musicians like Alto Pappert (formerly Kraan) and Aeras second decade musicians like Matz Steinke on bass and Limbus on percussions contributed to this great album. The first 4 titles on the CD (formerly A-Side of the album) are in the tradition of the second album "Hand und Fuss'. "Psychochinese im Stanzwerk" reminds to Amon Duul's Deutsch-Nepal. For the first time Muck Groh uses vocals in his compositions in a folky style and "Blinde Kuh" reminds a little bit to the early German new wave bands like Spliff or Nina Hagen Band. All in all this album shows many facets of Muck Grohs composer abilities and convinces with its clever arrangements. CD comes with comprehensive booklet with rare and unseen photos and there are 8 bonus tracks taken from a concert from 1981."
    $21.00
  • "Next is the third album by Journey and was released in 1977.Journey continued the formula from 1976's Look into the Future but this album also retains some of Journey's progressive rock style from the first album."
    $5.00