Quiet...Listen!

Quiet...Listen!

BY Septum

(Customer Reviews)
$8.00
$ 4.80
SKU: AP1312
Label:
Azafran Media
Category:
Power Metal
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Septum is a new metal band from Cuba (of all places).  The music of this large female fronted ensemble bears a striking resemblance to To-Mera with perhaps a touch of Mago De Oz.  Vocalist Jessica Sori has a beautiful voice that soars over the intricate compositions and chunky riffing.  Along with twin guitars and keyboards, bagpipes, flute, and violin are incorporated to lend a touch of an ethnic folk element.  In case you were wondering - yes - Ms. Sori sings in english.  The release comes housed in a mini-LP size sleeve.  Highly recommended.

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