Protein For Everyone

SKU: EANTCD1036
Label:
Esoteric Antenna
Category:
Canterbury
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"Last year's "Where Business Meets Fashion" caught my ear with its unusual ability to mix instantly hummable pop melodies, darkly sardonic, observational lyrics and time signatures that seem almost impossible to dance to, but entice the feet to try anyway.

Esoteric Records were paying attention too, and they've signed the Bristol based quartet for the release of follow-up album "Protein For Everyone", which continues to hone their strengths, and sounds like it's had a bunch of money thrown at it by the label (although I gather that the album had already been recorded prior to signing with Esoteric?). Anyway, what I'm trying to say is that it sounds very nice indeed, crisp and LARGE.

Schnauser founder Alan Strawbridge has always had a way with a winning tune as those who have followed him from his early days in the Lucky Bishops will know, but with Duncan Gammon, Holly McIntosh and Jasper Williams, he's found a group of co-conspirators who bring so much to the table that it would be unsporting, and inaccurate to think of them as a supporting cast.

"Protein For Everyone" continues on in much the same vein as "Where Business Meets Fashion" - it's pop music for smart people basically - with a perfect combination of quirky, harmony-laden vocal structure, and 'should be, but aren't' self-indulgent detours, that are as grin inducing as the unfailingly huge choruses are.

You can look at early Soft Machine and Caravan for precedents of this sound, but Schnauser are much more knowingly contemporary, and shun the more recent "advances" in progressive rock (palm-muted guitars are refreshingly absent), in favour of something which has more in common with adventurous indie practitioners like White Denim.

Even epic seventeen minute closer "Disposable Outcomes" avoids the po-faced nature of what we've come to expect from long, progressive suites. Its a perfect distillation of Schnauser's ability to hit the listener with the unexpected, and turn perceptions and expectations upside down. And more importantly, it's a whole lot of fun." - The Active Listener

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  • "A singular and rare neogothic concept album combining the sound of a grand pipe organ with the typical progressive rhythm section: “The Legend of the Holy Circle” is the second concept album from the italian band Three Monks after their debut album “Neogothic Progressive Toccatas” published in 2011. The project is centered around the incredible pipe organ playing of Paolo Lazzeri supported by a thundering bass/drums rhythm sections and little else. This album is a church organ purist's dream. The various tracks are inspired by baroque composers and stories of cathedrals and their huge, historic pipe organs.. The music is incredibly heavy, vast, formal, and tinged with centuries of age. You feel as if you are walking into one of those centuries old European cathedrals and hearing the bombast of the ancient organ, yet it is swirled into often dizzying progressive rock pieces.It is right compared to the bombast of EL&P, Areknames, Jacula, Van Der Graaf Generator and Il Balletto di Bronzo, but with 100% pipe organ rather than varying kinds of keys or synths, vocals, or guitar. Most of the music is in the heavy vein with eccentric and baroque aesthetics. Three Monks is a band who should be heard by Heavy Prog fans and fans of serious organ and classically influenced prog....do not hesitate..."
    $24.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are proud to announce the release of a newly re-mastered and expanded edition of the classic 1970 album HOME by PROCOL HARUM. Released in June 1970, the record followed on from the huge international success of the band’s debut single "A Whiter Shade of Pale” and the superb albums PROCOL HARUM, SHINE ON BRIGHTLY and A SALTY DOG.  Hailed by many fans as one of the finest albums released by the band, HOME saw the exquisite song writing of Gary Brooker and Keith Reid reach new heights on pieces such as "The Dead Man’s Dream”, the epic "Whaling Stories”, "About to Die” and more.Produced by Chris Thomas, the album captured a new line-up of the band featuring Gary Brooker (voice, piano), Chris Copping (bass guitar, organ), Robin Trower (lead guitar), and B.J. Wilson (drums).Newly re-mastered from the original tapes, this Deluxe edition of "Home” has been expanded to include 11 bonus tracks (3 previously unreleased) over two CDs, including rare tracks, alternate session takes and 2 previously unreleased BBC Radio session tracks from May 1970. This expanded deluxe edition of "Home” also includes a lavishly illustrated booklet that fully restores the original album artwork and features a new essay by Procol Harum biographer Henry Scott-Irvine."
    $19.00
  • "Santana's fourth album, Caravanserai, finally being reissued and remastered by Columbia Legacy/Sony, is a landmark recording for the band. Originally released in 1973, this album marked a change for the band, as they were moving away from the Latin tinged psychedelic pop rock of their earlier recordings to a more ethereal, jazz fusion based sound. Change also brought about line-up shuffles, as after this album second guitarist Neal Schon and keyboard player/singer Gregg Rolie left the band to form Journey. Famed keyboard virtuoso Tom Coster made his first appearance on this release, and he later spent many years alongside Carlos Santana in various incarnations of the band. The influence of groups such as Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Lifetime, Miles Davis, Larry Coryell's Eleventh House, and John Coltrane are heard all throughout this CD. Latin percussion mixes with swirling organ while Santana and Schon's guitar licks run rampant on each track. While the bands signature melody on "Song of the Wind" still remains a classic, it's the extended breakouts on tunes like "La Fuente Del Ritmo" , complete with an amazing electric piano solo from Coster, and the energetic "Just in Time to See the Sun" that really shine. Drummer Mike Shrieve comes into his own on this albums more jazzy context, and the percussive tandem of Jose "Chepito" Areas, Mingo Lewis, and the legendary Armando Peraza provide the perfect Latin rhythms. "Every Step of the Way" features some wicked guitar work from Schon and Santana, supported by manic percussion and raging organ from Rolie, and stands out as a classic example of Latin jazz fusion.My advice to you all, don't walk, but run to your local CD shop and indulge yourself in this timeless classic. The remaster job is superb, with every instrument crisp and clear, and you get a nice booklet that goes into the history behind the album. A must have!" - Sea Of Tranquility
    $5.00
  • Tenth studio album from the reconstituted verison of Focus led by Thijs van Leer.  Returning is original drummer Pierre van der Linden.  Bobby Jacobs handles bass and Menno Gootjes lead guitar.  X doesn't break any new ground.  This sounds just like classic Focus - van Leer concentrates on flute and Hammond organ and vocals.  Pure prog with strong jazzy overtones in places.  Neat cover art and logo courtesy of Roger Dean.  Highly recommended.
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  • After recording two albums the band The Web strangely decided to change their name to Samurai. The band was led by singer/keyboardist Dave Lawson who would join Greenslade after Samurai broke up. The music captures that early British prog sound with strong leanings in the Canterbury direction due to the prominence of the brass playing of two members Tony Roberts and Don Fay. The quiet flute based parts sound like out takes from In The Land Of Grey And Pink. Remastered from the original tapes and detailed liner notes from Dave Lawson. One of the great ones!
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  • "The Polish princes of post-rock present their positive and powerfully paced Eternal Movement. Do you like your post-rock? Then you're likely already familiar with Tides From Nebula who have released several solid post-rock album already. Tides new release Eternal Movement further solidifies the quartet's importance to this genre. The songs follow the well traveled loud-soft-loud formula with some subtle variations. Tides' music is entirely instrumental, there are no samples or vocals. You get four guys pounding away creating dramatic, sweeping music that drifts up and down in tone and pace. The musicianship is consistently good from all areas throughout the album with the perpetually changing material. The range of sounds in Tides' songs is quite dramatic. One moment you are hearing soft atmospheric keys, the next is harsh driving drums with distortion filled tremolo guitar.I always wondered what the 'Laughter of Gods' would sound like. Now I know, as it is the lead song on the album. The song kicks off bright and full of melody with an intriguing pairing of tremolo and rhythm guitar. Tides guitarists Adam Waleszynski and Maciej Karbowski are prominent throughout Eternal Movement as they weave all over the sound spectrum. 'Laughter of Gods' slows down for a breather mid-track with some soft synth that reminds me of rain drops. The keys disappear as striking guitar cuts back in and it's unrelenting until the track ends. Next the rocking 'Only with Presence' unfolds with a catchy driving melody and thrilling time changes. You will certainly gain "sudden enlightenment" from "Satori"'s uplifting vibe and gentle flowing melodies. The song ramps up for a mighty coda with a series of striking, and memorable bam! bam! bams! I'd imagine this would be an awesome song to hear live!'Emptiness of Yours and Mine' begins in a light dreamlike state. You'll awaken gradually as snappy guitar and wispy, soft ethereal atmospherics slowly drift into the track. The pattern of ending with amplified guns blazing continues as 'Emptiness' concludes with some gripping guitar shreds. As the guitars are busy soaring all over, the songs are kept grounded with Stolowski's emphatic drums and Weglowski's dynamic basslines. The uplifting energetic and catchy tracks continue with two of my favourites off the album, 'Now Run' and 'Let it Out Let it Flow Let it Fly'. It is hard to overlook Stolowski's killer drum flurries on 'Now Run' or his flying and flowing beat on 'Let it Out Let it Flow Let it Fly'. Great stuff. The album ends with the massive track, 'Up from Eden' which clocks in at close to 10 minutes. Predictably the track starts off mellow and jogs up and down the pace meter ending with some deep gritty chords.There is plenty to like on Eternal Movement. With nearly 50 minutes of impressive post-rock that repeatedly drags you back and forth across the musical nebula your brain will take a nasty aural clobbering. This is one beating you'll enjoy however. Eternal Movement is an easy recommendation for all fans of post-rock, guitar rock and instrumental rock. Tides From Nebula have crafted an album full of clever, engaging and deeply melodic songs that are executed with passion and finesse. Definitely give it a spin." - Echoes And Dust 
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  • Archival collection of unreleased recordings from an unknown British prog rock band that existed in the early 70s. No one in the band that is particularly well known although the leader Sammy Rimington apparently has been active in the US jazz scene for decades now. Rimington is the band's guitarist. He also plays flute and sax. The material has a strong emphasis on flute leads but offers up some nice cutting guitar leads as well. Vocalist Terry Cooke isn't a mind blower but he's certainly up to the task and contributes flute as well. The label hype references early Genesis, Frank Zappa, Mahavishnu Orchestra, and King Crimson as influences. Frankly the only one I can say I hear is a vague comparison to Islands-era Crimson. There is a jazz influence but I wouldn't really call this "jazz rock". This is prog rock that would have easily fit on Neon or Vertigo. Sound quality varies from"yeah I guess this is OK" to "perfect". Quite a nice discovery and essential for anyone interested in early British prog.
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  • Second album from this incredible fusion trio from North Carolina will blow your skull off.  Trioscapes consists of Between The Buried And Me bassist Dan Briggs and Walter Fancourt (tenor sax/flute), and Matt Lynch (drums).  Don't let the absence of keys or guitar throw you.  This is mild altering, high energy fusion. You get the chops from hell, tripped out soundscapes, and head throttling melodies.  And that's just the first tune!!!  Utterly lethal.  BUY OR DIE!!"Much of what can conceivable be written of Trioscapes‘ most recent album Digital Dream Sequence is exactly what could be written about their previous offering Separate Realities.Musicians, jazz musicians particularly, may spit their coffee all over their keyboards on reading that, apopleptic and petulant – pointing out that where the previous album was underpinned by Ionic mode progressions, that this one is rooted in the Chromatic (or somesuch muso guff). Suffice to say that, as with Separate Realities, Digital Dream Sequence does not cling to homely pentatonic melodies or major chord, 4/4 song structures.It is a surprising and joyful departure from the predictable, which would be easy to describe as mind-expanding if it did not so closely follow its predecessor in structure and feel.As it is, there are a few physical embellishments to the formula worth noting, but not many. Keyboard fills (or what sounds like keyboards – what Dan Briggs can do with a bass guitar and effects pedals can be confusing at times) bring an extra accent to the pieces, as well as atmospheric depth on, say, the opening sequence of ‘From the Earth to the Moon’. On that track, the use of keyboard wash with a glockenspiel voice is foregrounded in something that tips a hat to Pink Floyd’s exploration of moon themes, before it takes off into something more definitely Trioscapes in its saxophone/bass/percussion attack. The track goes on to finish with an outro that co-opts much of the main theme from Tubular Bells.Keys, elsewhere on Digital Dream Sequence, play a role more to do with sound dynamics than with song structure – they fill a gap in the lower mids that is left between Walter Fancourt’s flute and alto saxophone moments.To state outright that this album sounds like Separate Realities is misleading though – there is much in the way of progression to note, and a gelling of roles between band members who have, onstage and in the studio, found a way to fit their individual talents into a group dynamic. Although there were moments of more-than-the-sum-of-its-parts alchemy on the earlier album, they were rarer than they are on Digital Dream Sequence. The latter has more raw groove, embeds moments of individual technical dexterity into the compositions less abruptly, and overall displays a more comfortable fusion (arg – that word!) between the funk and metal aesthetics that comprise the Trioscapes recipe.Of that curious mix, the mention of both Pink Floyd and Mike Oldfield above may offer some clue – there is a smattering of prog rock reference on Digital Dream Sequence (the intro to final track ‘The Jungle’ particularly) which opens a world of musical territory to the trio. Particularly the rhythms of Mali, which fascinated prog musicians for much of the 80s. Or perhaps that is too fanciful (jazz and funk have, historically, a more direct conduit to African rhythms than anything channeled through prog, after all).Nevertheless, that final track, once one has re-accustomed the ear to the Trioscapes tag-team approach to rhythm, tension and controlled saxophone madness, throbs with a primal, sweaty and utterly invigorating energy that transcends jazz, funk, metal or rock and is its own glorious creation.Which is something that never quite happened on Separate Realities (and bear in mind that Separate Realities was chosen by this reviewer as the album of 2012). This time Trioscapes have thrown off the anxiety of influence, have coalesced their individual contributions into a smoother whole, and have dug deeply to find an immense gravitronic groove.It’s a throbbing monster of an album." - Trebuchet Magazine
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  • Ok let's cut to the chase...this is the same band but with a different sound. Being realistic you can't expect "Feel Euphoria" to sound like "V" or "Snow" when the primary songwriter is no longer involved. First off Nick's vocals are exemplary - he's a great singer and I don't feel the band is diminished in any way by have him out in front. The key here is the songwriting and it''s just...different. Overall the music seems a bit heavier and more immediate. A few of the tunes are bit less proggy but they all seem to have the right progified embellishments - Ryo's mellotron and organ bits seem to cover the bases well. My favorite tune is the long epic track "A Guy Named Sid" which captures some of the past's magic. Overall I think of this as a transitional release as the band redefines their sound.
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  • WOW!  Corima is a California based quintet that worships at the Magma altar.  Full on zeuhl but with a theme based around the Mexican god Quetzalcoatl.  Instrumentation is bass, sax, violin, keys, and drums.  Chanting vocals are a prerequisite.  The band doesn't win points for originality but if you love Magma you'll totally dig on this album.  It slams and will have your head spinning from beginning to end.  Highly recommended.
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  • "That it only took them two albums to reach a point of such accomplished ambition is testament to Deadly Circus Fire’s grit and tenacity, propelled from London’s fickle trend-following scene by their devotion to creating something earnest, intelligent and arresting.If you’ve heard their 2012 debut The King And The Bishop, The Hydra's Tailor will surprise you.No longer reliant on the suits-and-facepaint theatrical shtick to get them noticed, their maturity speaks volumes. The Hydra's Tailor is thick, pulsating melodic progressive metal. It plunges into moments of gothic-tinged post-metal, is as playful as Haken and discordant like Mastodon while hooking into melodies that expound the confidence and subtle anguish of Adam Grant’s vocals. The emotive potency of songs like Where It Lies, House Of Plagues and Universe are the icing on the cake from a band who have finally arrived." - Metal Hammer 
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  • Its been almost 4 years since the band's phenomenal debut.  Since that time the duo of Mariusz Boniecki and Marcin Kledzik have expanded into a live gigging quartet.  I'm pleased to say that in terms of their music the band has not lost any momentum.  The same influences are still present - you will hear the imprint of Porcupine Tree and King Crimson.  The title of the album is a bit of a giveaway - this is not uplifting music.  It is filled with noir-ish, melancholy atmosphere.  Emotion filled vocals ride on top of Crafty guitarwork.  The technicality is there but you have to listen for it.  Think of a head on collision between In Absentia and Discipline and then take it one step beyond.  Clearly Pinkroom does it again.  BUY OR DIE!
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  • Submarine Silence is a side project from Moongarden's Cristiano Roversi.  The bands first album was released 12 years ago on Mellow Records.  It was an instrumental album that paid a huge debt to early Genesis.  This low awaited follow up album is cut from a similar cloth but it does feature vocals.  Most of the band is fleshed out with other members of Moongarden and Mangala Vallis.  Vocals are sung by Mirko Ravenoldi, who frankly I'm not familiar with.  He sings in English and truth be told he's a much better guitarist than singer.  Luckily the album features long swathes of instrumental passages - all cut from the Genesis cloth.  Roversi's keyboard arsenal is chock full of all the old favorites - Mellotron, Hammond organ, Arp and Moog synths, etc.  Lots of similarities to Tony Bank's set up and I believe that is the whole point.  Not very Italian sounding at all.  If you long for the old school sounds of Nursery Cryme and Foxtrot check this one out.
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