Nightingale Express (BLOW OUT PRICE!)

A Liquid Landscape from The Netherlands is a bit of a departure for The Laser's Edge. Their slice of post-progressive music has a contemporary edge that finds them sitting alongside bands like Dredg, Anathema, and Porcupine Tree. The band has been a live act for several years and shared the stage with bands like Karnivool (AUS), Anathema (UK),Thrice (US) and Riverside (Poland).

During the past year the band also was a finalist at the prestigious annual Dutch Grand Prize contest and on top of that they had 3 sold out Noorderzon gigs, featuring a stunning visual show.

With all the material they had written, the band reached out to Forrester Savell (Karnivool, Helmet). Forrester liked the material a lot and he agreed on mixing the album and doing some production work as well.

‘Nightingale Express’ is a concept album. This inspired moviemaker Lex Vesseur to make a short movie with music from the album. He also made the artwork and the visuals for the live show. So both the music and the film return in an interactive rock show with a live VJ.

Washed up, tired and staggering across a beach in the early hours of the morning. Somewhere in the twilight between desperation and surrender, there is still a glimmer of hope. That sense that everything will be alright, no matter what the odds are.

This is what A Liquid Landscape sounds like.

 

Product Review

Wed, 2012-04-25 15:23
Rate: 
0
This is a grower. Powerful but understated with a real maturity in the songwriting. Each tracks builds and takes you on a journey. Might be 5 stars in another week.
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Product Review

Wed, 2012-04-25 15:23
Rate: 
0
This is a grower. Powerful but understated with a real maturity in the songwriting. Each tracks builds and takes you on a journey. Might be 5 stars in another week.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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