Necessary Wasted Time

The Custodian is a new British post-progressive rock band formed by Richard Thomson, vocalist for cinematic death metal band Xerath.  Unlike Xerath, The Custodian is an outlet for the more melodic, rock oriented writing from Thomson.

While there are moments in the album that harken back to old school bands like Genesis and Yes, the music of The Custodian is contemporary in sound.  Necessary Wasted Time is an album full of dynamics - light and dark shadings balancing acoustic vs electric, heavy vs pastoral.  While atmospherics and tension are a strong component of the album, the band demonstrates their adept musicianship offering up long instrumental passages to complement the emotion filled vocals.  When needed the band unleashes some complex electric runs.

The Custodian's debut should deeply resonate with fans of Steven Wilson, Riverside, Pineapple Thief, and Anathema.

Necessary Wasted Time was mixed by noted engineer Jacob Hansen and give the full audiophile mastering treatment from Bob Katz.

 

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I gave "The Warning After" a couple of listens and I have to say the singer is very good and the musicianship on this album is top notch. Magic tracks like Track 7 'Of Tears And Heaven'. Great song! Singer Andrea Marchisio has great range and knows his craft. Not forgetting Stefano Droetto (guitars), Lele Mr. Triton on keyboards (great work). This band can deliver some good metal. KILLER SOLOS!!Other tracks like track 3 'Brothers To The End' gives me the Megadeth/Queensryche feel which kicks ass and I think this band has a lot to offer on this release and for years to come. You might find yourself headbanging to track 5 'Standing In The Rain', a double bass explosion with some megaheavy riffs following. Drummer Luca Pellegrino forging consistency and ear pounding percussion on this release. Production is awesome and hats of to the engineers on this milestone. 

"The Warning After" has something special in it, finding it is the journey.

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