Live At The Philharmonie (Mini-LP)

SKU: 441012
Label:
SPV
Category:
Jazz Rock
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First time on CD. This is a live album recorded by the Dave Pike Set for MPS back in 1969 at the Berlin Philharmonie. Dave Pike was a popular vibes player. At the time he was working with Volker Kriegel in his quartet. Kriegel offered angular, psychedelic electric leads which throw a stark contrast to the fairly square accompaniment. The liner notes talks about the different influences on the band including Frank Zappa and you can hear a bit of that. Interestingly this is one of the earliest references to the term "progressive rock" I've read. This arrives in a gorgeous mini-LP sleeve, detailed liner notes and 24 bit mastering.

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