Live At Nearfest June 23, 2007

SKU: 669563536724
Label:
Doone Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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The title says it all. This is the band's live performance at Neafest 2007. The band spotlights material from all three studio albums.

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  • This is the third album from Syndone - a reunion album - that was originally released in 2010 on Electromantic Records.  Apparently it received little distribution and has now been reissued in a remastered edition via Fading Records.  It features one bonus track."Prolusion. The Italian band SYNDONE is the project and creative vehicle of composer and keyboardist Nik Comoglio. Formed in 1990 and disbanded three years later, following the production and release of the albums “Spleen” in 1992 and “Inca” in 1993. 17 years later Syndone is once more a going concern, and the first chapter in this band's second lease of life arrived late in 2010 in the shape of the CD "Melapesante", issued on Electromantic Records.Analysis. The last couple of decades have seen something of a tradition establishing itself in the music scene, with old bands deciding to get going again after a lengthy hiatus. Quite a few of these ventures seem to come as a direct result of either reviving faltering careers by the band members or just to use a well old name to get enough money into the bank account to survive whilst plying the musician trade. Others are less obvious, but a desire to create music and being at a stage in their lives, where the individual members have the possibility to spend the time needed, will often be the cause in those instances. Syndone is most likely a good example of the latter category. Musically we're dealing with an outfit with both feet well set and grounded inside the symphonic art rock tradition. Tangents of various kinds are constantly used, a minor army of reeds, brass and string instruments supply additional details and strengthen the musical companionship with classical symphonic music quite nicely, and the rock element is provided by a tight and creative rhythm section, and a lead vocalist conforming to what appears to be a strong Italian tradition for expressive, dramatic delivery. The only element some may feel missing will be the guitars, making a cameo appearance on a single track only on this production and then in the shape of classical rather than rock guitar in style. The compositions as such appear to be the result of extensive and painstaking planning, with a minor army of guest musicians providing numerous details of a sophisticated nature, more often than not emphasizing the symphonic aspects of the individual pieces. The vocal passages tend to be calmer, with organ, piano or synth gently underscoring the dominant lead vocals. Bass guitar and drums maintain momentum when applied, the latter more often than not adding a number of subtle intricate details to the proceedings. The instrumental sequences tend to be more energetic, featuring plenty of additional instrumentation and fairly advanced use and blend of harmonic themes and dissonant and at times disharmonic effects. In terms of stylistic expression, a fair few tracks incorporate details that jazz fans should easily recognize, be it the piano and drum-based motif that opens Mela Pensante or the ragtime tendencies that appear in efforts such as Malo in Adversity or final piece 4 Hands Piano Boogieprog. Gentle ballad-oriented pieces and efforts of a richer, tighter and in general more elaborate nature divide this disc more or less evenly. But none of the songs can be said to be conventional or predictable; a lot of effort has been used to provide surprises on each track, some more subtle than others. The haunting oboe solo on Dentro l'Inconscio is among the more delicate features, and the nifty harmonica and organ combination on Mela Di Tell an example of the more obvious kind. All of this splendidly put together, and utilizing Abbey Road studios for the mastering of this disc seems appropriate. How much better that studio is than others I can't say myself, but it is a name that that brings forth associations this production deserves.Conclusion. While not quite meriting a pure perfection grade from me, Syndone's comeback album is an inventive, high quality production through and through, of the kind that should warm the hearts and souls of even the most jaded symphonic art rock fans. In particular those who generally enjoy typical Italian lead vocals and the extensive use of traditional classical symphonic instruments. A strong production and one likely to be regarded as among the best albums of the genre released in 2010." - Progressor
    $17.00
  • "After several years' absence with members going off in their own various directions, Echolyn returned with a new offering. Cowboy Poems Free shows a decidedly more straightforward sound than their earlier days, while retaining the layered harmonies and often intricate phrasing for which the band is known. In many ways, this album strikes me as a worthy modern-day successor to The Band's work, a promenade of the American mythos part past and present, an examination that seems at once both of a particular time and universal. "Texas Dust" is a powerhouse of an opener. Brett Kull's plaintive, everyman voice is the perfect harness for this tale of live-by-the-day Texas farmers trying to eke out a living while at the mercy of nature. From the forceful, offbeat main riff that drives the tune, to Kull's final awe-engulfed cry "the wind came on," this is my favorite track of the album. Ray Weston, now taking over bass duties for the band, provides vocals ranging from the Prohibition-defying, hedonistic "Swingin' the Ax" to the loneliness of "1729 Broadway" (if I recall correctly, the lyrics to this one are adapted from an actual letter of an ancestor). "High as Pride," seems to point the way towards the band's next release, Mei. A sharp observation here from Kull: "At 18 our convictions are hills on which we look/At 45 they're caves into which we hide." The band takes one easy target liberty: urbane yuppie types in "Gray Flannel Suits," which is probably the least of the tracks, though I do like the line about "martini glasses that shimmer all weekend." Apart from that, this is pretty compelling music throughout, and the lyrics are consistently top-notch. Like Mei, well worth a listen." - Ground And Sky
    $14.00
  • New 2CD live set recorded in North America 1998 and Japan 1999.
    $6.00
  • Great archival discovery! Spettri was an Italian band from the early 70s. They emerged out of the beat scene and went for a more progressive sound. They were obviously influenced by British bands Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, and even Jethro Tull. The band never hit the studio proper. This features recordings that were done live in the studio in 1972 (don't worry the sound quality is fine). Its a conceptual work with some spoken narration. Also featured is some hairy guitar soloing and ripping organ breaks. I'm reminded a bit of Nuova Idea. Recommended to fans of Il Progressivo Rock Italiano.
    $16.00
  • "This story began in 1973 when Museo Rosenbach recorded their magnificent debut album Zarathustra that still is one of the boldest and most beautiful work in Classic Italian Prog and in contemporary music in general. And now nearly forty years later this new Italian band Il Tempio delle Clessidre (name taken from one song on the Zarathustra suite) performs the Zarathustra album in its entirety and most importantly and luckily, they perform it with respect to the original feel with original (obviously true analog sound I guess) and don´t try to change it to today´s "standards" in any way, with exception of some jamming that features nice Moog soloing from the great Elisa Montaldo on Superuomo. She´s also a great vocalist and is another lead voice on the Zarathustra, with Stefano "Lupo" Califi the original voice in Museo Rosenbach. And yet the sound is their very own, it´s just a bit different in colour. Actually their performance of Zarathustra is so mature in everything that I couldn´t have had believed to expect. If an inexperienced listener doesn´t know Museo Rosenbach ever existed he/she would be completely fooled by Elisa & boys as playing their very own music, they are that good. Bravo ! What a nice surprise. The band gives the very best and Zarathustra revisited is a superb performance and does honor and does justice to legendary band Museo Rosenbach.Il Tempio delle Clessidre is an incredible debut album and for me is like a continuation to the Zarathustra epic, in a way. It represents the softer, female side of the subject, of course thanks to Elisa´s compositions and performance. Don´t get me wrong, it is far from mellow or dull passages. On the contrary, it contains some very heavy moments, like all great music does. The music of both Rosenbach and Clessidre have the power, grandeur and, most importantly emotion as the best Italian (prog) music always is so very special of. Clessidre is a bold evidence that RPI is very alive and kicking, so to speak. Because music is foremost and most importantly emotion, in the positive sense and that´s the essence of all .Oh yes, the second part of the show features they own songs from the superb eponymous first album. Elisa Montaldo is the main composer and I just can´t stop admiring her enthusiasm for classic Italian prog that is so clear in her compositions. She is the most important female instrumentalist and writer in Prog of today. There are many good prog bands in modern Italian scene but Clessidre is very hard to surpass, both musically and as a performing unit. They are unique in modern Italian rock and in Prog Rock in general, they create a universe of their very own. There are not so many bands lead by a woman, particularly in Prog and especially in Italian scene, aren´t there. With the vocalist of Museo Rosenbach, Stefano "Lupo" Califi and the lovely lady Elisa this is a magical line-up.Needles to say there´s no single dull moment. This is a fine document of a very special band in modern prog, namely the "Lupo" Califi era Clessidre. Alongside the Italian Prog Exhibition (4 DVD set from 2010) this the very best DVD release in modern prog rock music so far, obviously a very hard job for any band to make better, particularly musically. Il Tempio delle Clessidre nicely represents the New Generation of Italian Prog and reigns supreme.Another nice surprise, their very first live show, in Genova they hometown in 2009 with very good sound & picture quality is in the second disc.Italian is the perfect language for symphonic progressive music, it just suits beautifully. And it´s so great to see the veteran proghead enjoying performing with his young companions who respect and prefer the origins of progressive rock, the symphonic way. They seem to understand that it´s only the music who is the true protagonist. This is a perfect union of the old & the new. This is triumphant for new Italian Prog and music itself. This all is so wonderful and extraordinary beautiful. Thank you so much, Elisa & boys." - ProgArchives
    $26.00
  • The madcap French jazz metal trio return with their sixth album.  Morglbl consists of guitarist Christope Godin, bassist Ivan Rougny, and drummer  Aurelian Ouzoulias.  The band has toured extensively around the world – USA, Europe, Russia and even China!  They have shared the stage with Liquid Tension Experiment, Bumblefoot, and Umphrey’s McGee among others.These three virtuosos are also well endorsed clinicians and have developed a following individually but when they come together the fireworks really start.  Tea Time For Punks doesn’t deviate from the tried and true Morglbl formula.  Take equal parts fusion and crushing metal power chords, then inject a healthy dose of tongue in cheek humor and you’ve got the perfect Morglbl album. The band is often described as Primus meets Steve Vai and Allan Holdsworth, with flavors of Frank Zappa! 
    $13.00
  • Remastered edition of this classic progressive hard rock album from the British twin axe attack.  Comes with three bonus tracks.
    $5.00
  • The bands latest album finds them kicking off the disc in pure retro-mode. "One More Time" is an all out Mellotron blitzkrieg that sounds like an out take from Yes' Fragile. In fact, Yes is the musical guidepost that is most touched on with this disc. The 24 minute "Love Is The Only Answer" finds the band squarely in their comfort zone - a bit of jazz, a bit of Yes - a bit of jam band. It's what they do - no real surprises to be found and for their fans I think that is exactly what they want. Another jam packed disc - 74 minutes long.
    $12.00
  • Fourth studio album from the prog "supergroup" of Mike Portnoy (ex-Dream Theater), Roine Stolt (The Flower Kings), Neal Morse (ex-Spock's Beard), and Pete Trewavas (Marillion).  Like the previous albums expect marathon length pure prog rock that reflects back onto the golden age.  The title track is 32 minutes long!This is the 2CD/DVD Deluxe edition.Track List:Main Disc:1    Into the Blue                                          25:112    Shine                                                       7:263    Black as the Sky                                       6:434    Beyond the Sun                                        4:29 5    Kaleidoscope                                          31:53TOTAL TIME: 75:43      Bonus Disc:1    And You and I                                         10:432    I Can't Get It Out of My Head                   4:433    Conquistador                                            4:104    Goodbye Yellow Brick Road                      3:165    Tin Soldier                                               3:216    Sylvia                                                      3:497    Indiscipline                                              4:438    Nights In White Satin                                6:12TOTAL TIME: 40:59Making of Kaleidoscope DVD – Full length DVD behind the scenes of the writing and recording of this amazing album. Running time 1 hour and 26 minutes. Edited by Randy George. NTSC Region Free
    $28.00
  • The Italian band The Watch are probably the pre-eminent prog band to capture the classic Gabriel-era sound of Genesis.  While the band tours doing covers of Genesis tunes hey write original material that could easily have been lifted from Nursery Cryme.  Tracks From The Alps is their latest.  It includes all original compositions except their reinterpretation of "Going Out To Get You", a track from Genesis' debut album.  If you like "the sound" The Watch will be indispensible.  I consider them a guilty pleasure and have enjoyed all of their releases.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • Magenta's latest finds them returning to an overtly progressive rock sound and the music is all the better for it.  The Twenty Seven Club is a concept album based around famous rock stars that died at the age of 27 (Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hedrix, Kurt Cobain, ao).  The core lineup is Rob Reed, Christina Booth, and Chris Fry.  For this album the band is rounded out by guest drummer Andy Edwards of IQ.  Reed's keyboard work is back in the fore and Fry's Howe-isms on guitar always bring a polish to the music (and grin on the face).  Christina Booth's voice is a real gift and she shines as always.  Overall the music makes some overt references to Yes and Genesis so you get that old school flavor that the band hasn't offered in many years.  The album arrives in a special edition with a bonus DVD.  You get the complete album in a 5.1 mix, documentary footage and a promo video for one of the tunes.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Well Opeth went and did it.  They gave prog rock fans the album they've been waiting for - the one that Heritage alluded to and came close to delivering.  Pale Communion is a full on prog album.  All clean vocals, tons of gorgeous keyboard sounds that will conjure up images of the 70s.  In fact if this album arrived with a Vertigo swirl on it I wouldn't have been surprised.  Some heavy riffing but no real metal elements within earshot.  The album was mixed by Steven Wilson and if anyone knows "the sound" its him.  By the way the album was recorded at Rockfield Studios which is holy ground for prog fans.  Prog rock album of the year?  You bet!  BUY OR DIE!!This is the CD/Blu-ray edition.  It arrives in a digipak and has expanded packaging.  Audio comes to you via a standard CD plus a Blu-Ray.  What's on it you ask?  You get a 5.1 audio mix plus 2 live bonus tracks recorded in Stockholm. 
    $18.00
  • No subtleties here. This is pure bible thumpin' prog done up as only Mr. Morse can. The core trio remains Neal Morse, Mike Portnoy and Randy George although there are some guest appearances such as Carl Groves on backing vocals.
    $8.00
  • So here's my personal confession...after Neal left I felt that Spock's Beard lost their way.  Nick is a fine vocalist but there was something quirky about Neal's writing that had a reverential old school quality that I found lacking.  The albums didn't grab me.  Nick left and Ted Leonard took over on vocals.  Whether it was Enchant or Thought Chamber, he's always stood out and he fits Spock's Beard quite well.  The new drummer Jimmy Keegan slipped into the blend with no dificulty.  The result is (to my mind) a resurgence from this band.  Ryo Okumoto always puts on a show - in particular his heavy reliance on Hammond organ reminds me quite a bit of Steve Walsh.  In fact the sound of the whole album has a Kansas vibe. Coincidentally David Ragsdale guests on one track.  I'm not sure I can remember the last time I said this about a Spock's Beard album - Highly recommended."Very few bands are so recognizable that you know who you are listening to within 2 seconds.  That is all it takes at the beginning of the first track on The Oblivion Particle to know you are listening to Spock’s Beard.  There is no slow buildup or keyboard swells, just straight BAMM!, here we go.  And if the opening notes don’t get you, the organ 5 seconds in will.  The band’s 12th studio album, this one the second with singer Ted Leonard and drummer Jimmy Keegan, is a culmination of years of perfecting a sound and identity, one that not even 2 major lineup changes could fracture. With this new album, Spock’s Beard up their game again and show that this lineup is here to stay.If there was a track that defined what Spock’s Beard are, it might be the opening track, “Tides of Time.”  There are certain checklist items that mark their sound and they are all in this track.  The organ, the harmonies, the acoustic breakdown, the rocking middle and the epic ending.  Each member finds their moments to shine on this one and it provides a jaw-dropping sound overload that could leave one satisfied at that moment; only there is another 60 minutes to go.The album zigs and zags through a few more experimental moments, mixing in some surprises with more traditional Prog elements.  The album’s second track and first single is “Minion”, is a perfect example.  The opening a cappella harmonies provide the sort of memorable chorus and harmonies we’ve come to expect from the group.  While, the following distorted keyboard section is also standard Spock’s Beard.  But the verse and middle of the song is much darker and takes us on a surprising journey.The most unique song the album is the brilliantly titled “Bennett Built a Time Machine”, which the album’s cover is based on.  Drummer Jimmy Keegan takes lead on the vocals here and sounds incredible.  His voice actually fits the track better than Leonard’s probably would have.  The song is one of the album highlights and helps keep the record from sounding redundant.  It is almost a pop song most of the way through until turning on the jets and shifting into Prog mode.There are some heavier moments such as “Hell’s Not Enough” and “Get Out While You Can”. “The Center Line”, however, might be the most similar to something you might have found on their group’s previous album “Brief Nocturnes…”  The track opens with an expansive piano recital piece, before turning into a combo Prog-Western bounce with acoustic guitars carrying the groove. Ted’s voice lifts the choruses flawlessly and creates an almost cinematic soundscape.Even with all of these great moments, it is the album’s closing track that is the best song on the album.  “Disappear” might be one of the best songs the band has recorded since Neal left the group.  “We could disappear, you and me, we could be, anyplace else not here” sings Ted in the chorus as he wonders what might be if we left with no one knowing what happened.  The song is really the closest thing to a ballad on the album, but it doesn’t stay that way for long.  2 minutes in, the song stirs into a frenzy just before a brief cameo by Kansas’ David Ragsdale, appearing with his violin.  Of course, the big epic orchestral ending takes us home as Alan Morse provides the finishing touches with his unique finger picking soloing excellence.Spock’s Beard are Prog rock’s most reliable unit.  They have yet to disappoint and always provide comfort to their faithful fans with music that is both inspiring and breathtaking.  And while The Oblivion Particle shows a harder edged Spock’s Beard, it also displays a group that shows no signs of slowing down and is ready to take on all comers." - The Prog Report 
    $12.00