Lights Out

SKU: 2963-2
Label:
Nuclear Blast
Category:
Hard Rock
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Stunning third album from these Swedish 70s hard rock revivalists.  Graveyard delve into the same gene pool as Witchcraft but the music is more Yin than Yang.  More Led Zeppelin than Black Sabbath.  Some blues driven psychedelia laced with a bit of phat analog keys drives the point home.  If these guys were around 40 years ago they would have been at the top of the heap. Yeah...they're that good.  Highly recommended.

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  • "Are we being manipulated? Who would benefit from us, to follow pre-established rules? Careless. As sheeps. Political parties? Religious organisations? Commercial companies? TV networks? Beware of everything, even NEMO...NEMO is one of the leading Prog Rock bands in France, and after 13 years of existence they conquered the world community of Prog lovers with their previous albums (Si, Barbares, R€volu$ion…). Their 8th studio album is about every kind of manipulation. On 2 CDs, 12 songs, they warn you about everyone, even them! Musically you will hear a varied and strong blend of what Nemo is all about, featuring a big dose of experimentation and new exploration. Beware of this album, you will succumb to its charms! "CD1:01. Stipant Luporum 2.0102. Trojan (Le ver dans le fruit) 8.5303. Milgram, 1960 5.5904. Verset XV 7.5505. Un pied dans la tombe 7.1106. Neuro-Market 6.3407. Le fruit de la peur 9.43CD2:01. A la une 5.0802. Triste fable 7.4603. Allah Deus 5.0804. Opium 9.1005. Arma Diania 17.19
    $22.00
  • New reworked edition of the band's first album - from back when they were originally known as Witsend.  This new version features remastered, resequenced tracks, bonus tracks, new artwork and liner notes.  It might have been their first album but it was certainly one of their best!  Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hardly be called fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.This was actually the very first release from the Three Blind Mice label back in 1972.  It is also the first album from alto/soprano saxophonist Kosuke Mine.  He had previously played with the great Masabumi Kikuchi but this was his first recordings in which he led his own ensemble.  The quintet also included the amazing Takahask Mizuhashi on bass, Hideo Ichikawa on electric piano, Takashi Imai on trombone, and Hiroshi Murakami on drums.  The album consists of 4 long modal jazz explorations filled with some incredible soloing.  A stunning album that will take you to another dimension. 
    $29.00
  • "As band histories go, Skyharbor‘s is somewhat unique. Debut album Blinding White Noise was a bit of a (nevertheless beautiful) Frankenstein’s monster – bolted together gradually onto the skeleton of guitarist Keshav Dhar’s home studio demos. With members spread across three continents, live performances have been few and far between, limited to one-off festival appearances and just a couple of short tours – probably fewer than twenty shows in total. With the line-up solidified and a very successful crowdfunding campaign under their belts, Skyharbor have delivered their second album Guiding Lights.Right from the start it is clear that Guiding Lights is a more focused affair than its predecessor. Possibly with the benefit of having a better idea of what they are aiming for together as a band, it sounds much more cohesive and sure of its own identity.Guiding Lights is also slightly more restrained than Blinding White Noise. The guitars are more driven by texture than out-and-out riffing, and there are fewer djentisms. There’s also barely a vocal scream to be heard throughout its duration, which may be a disappointment to those for whom that kind of thing is important.Obviously, a significant chunk of the spotlight will fall on singer Dan Tompkins, especially because of his recent decision to re-join TesseracT – but Dan has used the time he spent apart from the band in which he really made his name to show how capable he is at managing multiple projects simultaneously. Since the summer of 2013 alone, as well as Skyharbor and TesseracT we’ve seen him record and perform with In Colour, White Moth Black Butterfly and Piano, not to mention a host of one-off guest appearances – yet it is clear that Guiding Lights received his undivided attention, and the result is potentially his most captivating performance to date. There is a shift in his approach in the direction of Maynard James Keenan, particularly in his phrasing, which both suits his voice and compliments the music.This is especially apparent on “Halogen“. Falling around halfway through the album, the song is very probably the best Skyharbor have written. A genuine masterpiece, with no fewer than three sections vying for the position of chorus. It is one of those rare tracks that practically demands skipping back for a second listen the moment it has finished. Glorious.Whilst there are some more uptempo passages, particularly in “New Devil“, the majority of the album is mid-paced. It carries a vibe that seems to draw inspiration from the likes of Tool, Karnivool and the dreamier parts of the Deftones‘ discography. Anup Sastry’s inspired drumming also has similar flavours to Stephen Perkins of Jane’s Addiction, which provides a subtle sense of urgency under Keshav and Devesh Dayal’s intertwining guitars.Guiding Lights feels particularly well-named. It shimmers, glistens and sparkles throughout its near 70 minute run-time with an uplifting feel that is frequently close to euphoric. But more than this, Guiding Lights is Skyharbor coming of age. Blinding White Noise showed what enormous potential this collection of musicians had together, and the album is all the stronger for having them all working together on the material from day one.Guiding Lights is an enthrallingly beautiful album that should help warm the hearts of progressive metal fans as the winter nights draw in. It would be easy to see Skyharbor as a kind of side-project supergroup, but that feels like it sells them short. We can only hope that with all the various commitments the members of Skyharbor have on their collective plates, they are able to carve out the time to keep the band as a going concern." - The Monolith
    $15.00
  • "As the eerily enticing extended intro to 'Diarabi', the opening track from Goat's 2012 debut World Music, twists and turns into the slightly less eerie but equally enticing main body of the track, it has already become glaringly apparent that this is a very impressive live band at work. Over the twelve tracks on Live Ballroom Ritual you are assaulted by a live show that is complex, bizarre and more often than not, brilliant. Goat are like few other bands around at the moment, or at least few other bands that have gained any sort of wide-ish spread recognition. They are at the forefront of experimental music and for good reason.Following the excellent 'Diarabi', 'Golden Dawn' is like something from another age. They fuse together tribal drums, reminiscent of early Santana, vocals reminiscent of African tribal music, funk guitars and a healthy dose of 70s psychedelic rock. It really is the sum of its parts, each component amalgamated together effortlessly.The band's playing is loose but on point throughout. Although coming across as totally free-form, there's a definite sense of purpose in every note they play. Despite more or less every song here being stretched far beyond its recorded length, very rarely does this feel tiresome. Whereas those who were around in the 70s may think that self-indulgence has been done and many others just shudder at the thought of it, it's rarely even an option these days. In musical climate where everything tends to veer towards a formula and where too many live acts just recreate their songs as they are on record, distracting us with glossy production values, the sense of adventure and old-school musicianship displayed by Goat is a more than welcome change in direction. This is original, invigorating music, played in an often overlooked manner. It's indulgent, but it's not self-gratifying. The listener is the one being indulged.Trying to categorise Goat's music would be a hopeless exercise. Where one second they're unleashing the crazed psych-disco of 'Disco Fever', the next they're laying down the slow, infectious groove of 'Let It Bleed'. The groove is led by guitar work which is largely reminiscent of Tinariwen's Saharan-blues. Though influences are notable throughout, they are moulded and worked to fit within the band's own singular vision of fusion music. By the end of 'Let It Bleed', jazz trumpets have taken the lead and the song is off heading down a different road. Even if you've heard their studio work, their live set is still ridden with surprise turns.It's a rare occurrence that a live album truly seizes your attention and presents itself as a piece of work to be judged on an equal footing as a studio record. Live Ballroom Ritual however, is one of those occurrences. Obviously, to see them live, with their masks, energy and grand sense of theatre would be even more impressive, but as long as you can remove that from your mind, you're not likely to hear many better live albums. Generally, live albums serve as a reminder of a tour you attended or as an addition to your collection of a favourite band's recordings. Obviously there are exceptions and great live albums do exist, but it remains hugely impressive for a live album to be this enjoyable. Especially when you don't know the band's work inside out. That is the true testament to a band's live credentials.'Run To Your Mama' best embodies how good a live album this is. The huge guitar chord that beckons the song in really grabs you by the particulars and whisks you along with its primal energy. Where too many live albums try, and fail, to recreate the atmosphere of being at the gig with overly loud crowd noise and every bit of chat from the band, Live Ballroom Ritual makes the music the sole focus. As a result of this, you feel more like you're actually there than any crowd atmosphere will ever manage.For the sake of finding some kind of downside to the album, 'Goatlord' is a bit dull and 'Disco Fever' should perhaps be a bit shorter. Other than that though, they've pretty much nailed it. Of course, by the very nature of the music, Goat will be far from everybody's cup of tea but it's a cup that everyone should try at least once.The pinnacle of the album is 'Det Som Aldrig Förändras - Kristallen Den Fina'. It's an eleven minute amalgamation of everything that Goat do; and it just so happens that they do almost all of it really rather well. Its introduction and monumental riff could almost be on a Kyuss record and from here it meanders fearlessly into every corner of psychedelic rock. Put simply, it's fucking brilliant. That's also the best way to describe Goat and the best way to describe this album. Listen to it now." - The 405
    $18.00
  • Official reissue of this UK rarity originally released on the Parlophone label in 1971. There was a legit CD reissue some years ago but even that is rare! Norman Haines was the keyboardist from Locomotive. After their sole release (Everything You See) he broke up the band and went solo. The music is organ driven proto-prog/hard rock with some great guitar breaks. Not sure what Haines fed his organ through but he gets a distorted Mike Ratledge cum Dave Stewart sound. If you are fond of that English early prog sound you should check this out. Comes with 6 bonus tracks and extensive liner notes.
    $17.00
  • New digipak edition combines the first two parts of a trilogy that was rounded out with Invictus.  Its equal parts rock opera and power metal.  Each album is enhanced with two bonus tracks.
    $13.00
  • Third and best album from this Italian band that started out in a psych/proto-prog direction. Great example of "Rock Progressivo Italiano". Long suites filled with spacey keys and slashing guitar leads. The keys really make this album - 'tron, phat Moog sounds blast into the ether. Dynamic listening experience with quiet interludes and vocal harmonies interspersed with exciting outbursts of keyboard/guitar interplay. In that respect I'm reminded of Le Orme's Felona E Serona. I've seen this album get knocked on some prog forums and for the life of me I can't imagine why. To my mind this one is a classic and a must own. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Third album from this intense Danish trio is only available on vinyl.  Papir create heavy psychedelic jams that evoke the feel of early German bands like Ash Ra Tempel and Guru Guru.  The album was produced by Causa Sui mainman Jonas Munk who totally catches the vibe.  Crazed wah-wah laced solos that will blast you into the cosmos!  I'm getting high just writing about it!!!  This one kills and it kills and it doesn't stop killing from beginning to end."Papir is an instrumental trio from Copenhagen, Denmark. They’ve created their own unique type of semi-improvised psychedelic rock by mixing together new and old, heavyness and atmosphere, freedom and power. By now they have become masters of their craft, and this, their third album, earns them a spot in the absolute elite of the current European psychedelic rock scene. Everyone who has been lucky enough to catch the band live know what an reverence-inducing experience their energitic, adventurous explorations can be. Papir are the perfect antidote to the fashionable trends that continues to dominate the present, but they don’t go beyond the limited to scope of the dominating indie-rock by merely reaching back to the bygone golden era of pyschedelic rock and electric jazz like so many others do – they transcend it. Their music sounds vital and fresh.When Mojo writer Kieron Tyler visited Denmark’s renowned SPOT Festival in the summer of 2012 he was blown away by Papir’s performance as an experience that clearly stood out compared to the rest of the bill (that included all of Scnadinavias leading acts): It takes a lot to stand out at SPOT…but Copenhagen’s Papir are arresting. Their guitar, bass and drums mesh powerfully in an intense, jazz-inflected instrumental rock. Voyaging through post-rock Tortoise terrain, it nods towards Hawkwind’s freak outs and employs liberal dollops of wah-wah pedal. The pieces – not songs – twist and turn like Dark Star Grateful Dead. From these jumping off points, Papir scurry off on their own path." 
    $23.00
  • "When Jethro Tull released Benefit in 1970, it signaled a new, more progressive musical direction for the English band. It also became one of the best-known albums of their career, which is going strong more 60 million records and 40 years later. The Grammy winning group is revisiting that pivotal album with a 2-CD/DVD-Audio collector s edition.The 2-CD/DVD collection comes loaded with a massive amount of music recorded by the band, which at the time featured: multi-instrumentalist frontman Ian Anderson, guitarist Martin Barre, drummer Clive Bunker, pianist John Evan, and bassist Glenn Cornick.The first disc contains the album s 10 original tracks, plus five bonus tracks that include both the U.K. and U.S. stereo versions of "Teacher. " All the songs are newly mixed by Steven Wilson and approved by Ian Anderson. The second disc includes newly remastered versions of rare tracks and singles recorded around the same time as Benefit, such as "Sweet Dream" in both stereo and mono.The audio-only DVD, which is available exclusively with this version, is packed with 58 tracks, including the album and bonus tracks in 5.1 surround sound. It also contains the U.K and U.S. versions of the album. The American version was sequenced differently and replaced the U.K. track "Alive and Well and Living In" with "Teacher. " In addition, the set also comes with a handsome booklet filled with rare photographs, an essay by Martin Webb, and interviews with band members."
    $28.00
  • This psychedelic trio has been kicking around for over a decade.  At their jammiest best I'm remind very much of a Steve Hillage freak out - lots of watery glissando guitar leads.  The rest of it has a definite 70s West Coast vibe.  Very trippy stuff. "Guy Blakeslee is a man of many faces and talents. Every time I see him perform he seems to have been cascaded by a new identity and the music is telling of that change in identity. While Blakeslee has a history of recording under a bluesy solo moniker of Entrance, then transitioning from that to a full band with the epic heavy death rattle Blues masterpiece Prayer of Death. Only after that did he change the name of the group to The Entrance Band. And with that, they released an eponymous debut album to celebrate the collective’s cohesion. With this release, there came a different dynamic in sound. It was as much set in Blues and Psychedelic Rock as it was an almost likely return to arena Rock of days old.For this reason as well as The Entrance Band’s live performances that are quite simply matched by none living today, I have kept them on my radar for several years. They delight every human sense. Needless to say, I was enthralled when I discovered Face The Sun, their sophomore album. The Entrance Band relish in psychedelia here, swirling guitars, sumptuous wah-wahs, lyrical witchcraft. “Fine Flow” is a fantastic album opener, setting the stage with a bassline that will stick like a wad of gum to the back of your mind. “The Crave” is an especially appealing track, Blakeslee’s vocals are wanton and pained with delicious Blues harp interjections and the gentle addition of harpsichord in the track’s culmination. “No Needs” is The Entrance Band’s radio worthy track of the album, for it really shines with powerful vocal delivery, outstanding and diverse instrumentation (even featuring a flute driven climax). The real spectacle of this album is the diversity in styles they embrace. Borrowing instrumental techniques from various country-oriented genres such as Spain’s fingerpicking Flamenco and various earthy percussions. With each listen, a new layer of this album unravels and reveals itself to you. Pick it up and treat your mind to its elaborate caress, or for that matter, go for the gusto and pick up The Entrance Band’s three EP’s Dans La Tempete, Fine Flow EP, and Latitudes, all recently released and give them all a listen in succession. That will really take you on a spiritual ride!There is no telling where The Entrance Band will take us next. If I may be so bold, they may very well prove to be the Psychedelic equivalent of this generation’s The Doors, even if only by name. Offering us entrances to alternate realities one album at a time." - Its Psychedelic Baby
    $12.00
  • "A never before released full length concert album from one of the greatest undiscovered gems of 70s rock, Captain Beyond!Formed in 1971 by members of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly & Johnny Winter s band, Captain Beyond is heavy, spacey and most definitely FAR OUT!This show was recorded just after the release of the band s second album, Sufficiently Breathless, during the their tour with King Crimson!Liner notes by noted rock historian Dave Thompson!"
    $15.00
  • "Australian progressive rock band WITHOUTEND delivers a debut album offering a very original interpretation of modern Progressive Metal/Rock. The album's main concept of change and consequences is conveyed through a blend of dark melodic progressive music with very dark and emotional lyrical content. The opening track "Again" is based on the idea of coming face to face with temptation and living with your consequences and sets the scene for the rest of the album. "In Transit", perhaps the most commercially accessible tracks on the album deals with the life changing aspects of moving on to a new chapter of ones life and looking at life as being a silent movie. "Analyse" and "I Still Remember" both explore the breakdown in relationships in response to major life changes. "Searching for Meaning" and "Descend" are based on a persons quest for answers and questioning people's beliefs while living/existing in artificial and predetermined surroundings. "Comfort Zone" deals with one's personal battle against their comfort zone. "Compulsion" closes the chapter opened by the opening track and tries to solve and understand ones compulsive desires. The idea behind the last track, "The Third Day" was to express the time heels all wounds/solves all problems concept in a ballad which closes the album." - Prog Archives
    $3.00
  • When it comes to Dream Theater influenced prog metal no one does it like the Italians. Zen, Scenario, Mystere De Notre Dame, Solid Vision...the list goes on and on. Add Daedalus to the list as well. Like most of these bands mentioned there is a common flaw - lets call it a lapse of originality and a vocalist with good range but an accent. But all of these bands transcend these deficiencies with great chops and excellent compositions. Basically what I'm saying is that if you are a fan of the genre you are going to love this disc...just keep an eye out the window for the Originality Police. This is actually the second album for this band from Genoa. They went first class all the way - Roland Grapow mixed it and Rob Tyrant contributed some guest vocals. Noted illustrator Mark Wilkinson did the artwork. Highly recommended.
    $3.00