The Light

SKU: TMR0315
Label:
Tiger Moth Records
Category:
Art Rock
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Christina Booth is the charismatic vocalist for British symphonic rock band Magenta.  Her voice has always brought about comparisons to Annie Haslam (and in fact they recorded together).  Christina had a well documented successful battle with breast cancer.  It was during this time that she wrote the material for her second solo album.  The music doesn't have the complexity or full on "prog" nature but she is helped out by members of the prog community including Rob Reed, Chris Fry, JOhn Mitchell, Andy Tillison, and Theo Travis.  It would be difficult to call this commercial music.  I guess they call this adult alternative these days.  Its a great showcase for her wonderful vocal talents and is filled with tons of atmosphere.  Good late night listening.

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  • Ok this is the set for those of you that simply don't care about all the hi-res stuff.  This is the latest in the 40th anniversary series featuring remixes by Steven Wilson.  Here is what you get:CD 1 contains a new stereo remix plus 3 alternate mixes.  CD 2 contains the 30th anniversary remaster (the old mix) plus a radio advert and the rare "Easy Money" US promo EP edit.
    $18.00
  • Specially priced 2CD set includes the digipak editions of these two classic SBB albums.  Each one has bonus material.  Essentially its 2 for the price of 1.
    $16.00
  • Riverside's latest takes a bit of a swerve from their traditional sound.  Parts of the album bears the imprint of Mariusz Duda's solo work - its more laid back, more refined.  Other aspects of the album carry on with the sound that Riverside has developed over recent albums - chunky organ, trippy keyboard soloing and interstellar guitarwork.  This one is a grower.  At first listen it might not hit you but the more you scrape away at it the more you realize its dug deeper under your skin."For the past decade or so, Polish progressive rock/metal quartet Riverside set itself apart from their stylstiic brethren by offering distinguishing tones, mesmerizing atmospheres, and most importantly, remarkable songwriting. Sure, the band also infuses much of its music with the intricacy genre enthusiasts expect, but their melancholic, yet beautiful and earnest melodies and lyrics (credited mostly to singer/songwriter/bassist Mariusz Duda) have always come first. Perhaps nowhere in its discography is this more apparent than on their newest opus, Love, Fear and the Time Machine.Although it features a few complex arrangements, the record is by far Riverside’s most straightforward and accessible collection to date, showcasing a proclivity for upfront compositions like never before. While this may disappoint fans who adore the group’s more tangential, frantic instrumentation, rest assured that the album’s stunning emotionality and breathtaking arrangements more than make up for it. Without a doubt, Love, Fear and the Time Machine features some of the most gorgeous, tragic, and ultimately inspiring pieces Riverside have ever recorded, making it another exceptional entry in an invaluable catalog.According to Duda, the effort is a return to the softer, more ambient nature of Riverside’s debut, 2004’s Out of Myself. In fact, the foursome intentionally composed it “to combine the ‘70s and the ‘80s…[the songs] have never been so concise and to the point before.” Because of this new approach, the disc actually evokes Duda’s other project, Lunatic Soul, in subtle but substantial ways at times. Like almost all of Riverside’s previous works, Love, Fear and the Time Machine is also a conceptual record; specifically, it “talk[s] about transformation. About making an important, perhaps life-changing decision everyone has to make at some point in their lives…on the one hand, we’re excited by the change…[but] on the other, we fear the unknown.” Ultimately, the lesson to be learned from it is that “if we sometimes get lost in life, it is to go through something and be found again on the other side, to be reborn as someone better and more valuable.”Fittingly, then, the sequence starts with “Lost (Why Should I Be Frightened by a Hat?)”, which is arguably its best track. Duda begins by reciting a philosophical recollection over a delicate ether of keyboards and bass and guitar notes. Afterward, he launches into a catchy and charming chorus: “Come follow me / We’ll go down / Where the river flows / One day / Just you and I will find a bridge / To another land”. Duda layers his voices too, making it even more gripping, and in-between his passages, guitarist Piotr Grudziński issues his signature soaring accompaniment as the composition evolves. Drummer Piotr Kozieradzki keeps things steady throughout, while keyboardist Michał Łapaj gets the spotlight during the final seconds. Ultimately, “Lost” exemplifies the magnificent succinctness that makes Love, Fear and the Time Machine distinctive in the Riverside canon.Later on, “#Addicted” truly feels like a progressive rock take on the Cure in several ways, such as its dominant bass lines, starry guitar lines, and wistful singing which finds Duda channeling a silky falsetto he’s never really attempted before. There’s also a brief acoustic guitar arpeggio at the end that’s very enjoyable. Lyrically, it serves as a commentary on how social media can transform people into egocentric users who base their self-worth on their digital populiarty. In this way, both its lyrics and music find Riverside stretching slightly beyond its comfort zone, but the result is undeniably, well, addictive.“Caterpillar and the Barbed Wire” feels more traditional, with Duda’s sorrowful confessions and counterpoints perfectly complemented by sharp guitar riffs, aching solos, enveloping percussion, and a moving layer of synthesized splendor. Honestly, it’s like a heartbreaking and somewhat more colorful missing track from Shine of New Generation Slaves, whereas “Saturate Me” contains the sleek yet eccentric tones and virtuosic yet blunt balance that made up the best moments on Rapid Eye Movement. Of course, its sad ponderings, such as “Am I Invisible? / Or alive? / I don’t want to feel like I’m no one anymore”, are archetypal Riverside sentiments, and the interlocking musical patterns (especially near the end) are equally touching.The most commercial segment on Love, Fear and the Time Machine is surely “Discard Your Fear”; however, despite that typically negative connotation, the song’s approachability doesn’t get in the way of its worth. Rather, it’s uplifting message and relatively simple and familiar construction could earn Riverside an entirely new camp of fans. It’s actually quite cathartic, as is the dreamy and tasteful “Toward the Blue Horizon”, which begins and ends as a luscious ode (with lovely piano chords) while transforming into a progressive metal workout in the middle.Both of the record’s final two pieces—“Time Travellers” and “Found (The Unexpected Flaw of Searching)”—are wonderful. The former is an exquisite acoustic ballad about past possibilities and the unforeseen future. Its winding melodies and spaciousness are the standout features, as the rest of the band lets Duda’s voice lead the way, resulting in a simple but commanding experience. In contrast, the latter is more elaborate, impactful, and conclusive, with a strong sense of closure and acceptance, as the speaker realizes the importance of his or her experiences, uncertainties, and decisions. The music builds with great pacing, adding more beautiful layers as the chorus (“It’s a lovely life / You have gone so far / Don’t give it up / Oh, it’s a lovely life / Gotta go with what you think is right”) repeats with sleek harmonies. By the end, listeners are left in awe, reevaluating their own sense of purpose and optimism.Love, Fear and the Time Machine is likely the most polarizing record Riverside has made, as it could be considered both the band’s strongest and weakest full-length effort. Fans hoping for virtuosic jams and unexpected sounds won’t really find them here, while fans looking for more of Riverside’s token elegant instrumentation, affective melodies, and poetic, rich singing will be satisfied beyond measure. Either way, Love, Fear and the Time Machine definitely finds its creators reaching for new, if marginally different, heights, which is commendable in and of itself. Roughly ten years on, Riverside remains as special as ever, and Love, Fear and the Time Machine is, in several ways, its truest work of art." - Pop Matters
    $12.00
  • Sensory is proud to announce the signing and forthcoming release of a new rising star on the Greek progressive metal scene – Persona Non Grata.Greece has always had some of the most fervent metal fans in the world. Although the main interest has been so called “true metal” bands in the style of Manowar and Iron Maiden, progressive metal started to take hold of the country in the 90s. Bands such as Dream Theater and Fates Warning routinely perform in Athens and both have released live CDs and DVDs from their Greek performances. Greek bands such as Fragile Vastness and Sensory’s own Wastefall have generated a buzz world wide and the scene continues to expand. Persona Non Grata will surely continue this tradition of great progressive metal.Persona Non Grata’s formation began in 2003 when John Ioannidis (keyboards) invited Chris Gatsos (guitars) to join his group Fatal Error. It didn’t’ take long for John and Chris to realize that they had to move on to progressive metal music which was a mix of rock that John loved to play and heavy metal that Chris grew up with. In order to achieve this they had to change the band’s line up. During this period they focused on writing the music which would be the material for their first CD “Shade In The Light”.It was 2 years later when vocalist, Bill Axiotis, joined the PnG group and they started recording this album. They asked session musicians Akis Gavalas (drums) and Chris Vogiatzis (Bass) to help record the album. When the sessions were over they felt a synergy with the three members of the band and came on board permanently, completing the lineup of Persona Non Grata."Shade In The Light" captures a band creating complex music but coming from the melodic end of the metal musical spectrum. Similar bands would include Circus Maximus, Vanden Plas, and Poverty's No Crime.Persona Non Grata's MySpace Page
    $6.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."Searching for a way to retool their sound, Judas Priest attempted to accentuate their melodic side on Turbo by incorporating synthesizers and '80s pop-metal stylings ("Wild Nights, Hot & Crazy Days" sounds more like Poison, albeit with synths). The restrained songcraft sometimes pays dividends, especially on the synth-driven leadoff track, "Turbo Lover," easily the best song on the record and a successful reimagining of the Priest formula. But often, the band simply sounds directionless, unsure of exactly which path to accessibility it should follow; moreover, the synth-guitar backing and overly polished production give the album an oddly mechanized, processed feel. It certainly doesn't help most of the material, which is often at least competent but rarely inspired enough to make much of an impression. That's unfortunate because Turbo's best moments indicate that with a clearer focus, the album could have been a creative success; however, it's overall Judas Priest's weakest release since Rocka Rolla." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • With the anticipation of a new Marillion album on the horizon, we are going to hold back for just a short while on our next concept album. That doesn't mean however... that we don't have something very special to hold you over until the next epic is complete...  We present our new "bridge album" to take you from Edison's Children's last epic to out next, entitled:"SOMEWHERE BETWEEN HERE AND THERE..."is a non-conceptual album featuring several songs that have been kicking around the E.C. laboratory for a few years but will doubtfully ever see the light of day otherwise. It's not that we don't love them... they simply don't fit the "concept albums"of the past or the future. They are however, quite exciting pieces of music in their own right.• 15 never before heard tracks/remixes including 7 all new songs + 2 Downloadable Bonus Tracks(including the 3 new songs that were performed at the Marillion Montreal Weekend)- Growing Down in Brooklyn- Someone Took My Heart Away- Winter Solstice (instr.)- Stranger In A Foreign Land- Ever Be Friends- The Darkness (instrumental track intended for The Final Breath Before November but never used)- Sinner's Minus (instrumental track intended for The Final Breath Before November but never used)• 3 songs from the original version of "The Final Breath Before November" - originally mixed by King Crimson's Lead Singer Jakko Jakszyk incl: the original and slightly longer "whispery ending" of Where Were You!- Where Were You (14:10)- Light Years-  The Seventh Sign• The Longing (orchestral) - Mike Hunter originally gave us 2 mixes... a full on Rock Mix of The Longing as well as a far more orchestral version. We wound up using the "Rock Mix" for TFBBN. Hear for the 1st time what the orchestral version sounded like!• Never before released live version of A Million Miles Away from the 2013 Marillion Wolves WeekendThis is a full 80 minute album!
    $12.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are proud to announce the release of a newly re-mastered and expanded of Galactic Zoo Dossier , the first album by Arthur Brown's Psych / Space Rock outfit Kingdom Come. Issued on Polydor in 1971, the album launched the band, gaining instant notoriety. Touching on the musical territory of fellow travellers Hawkwind, Galactic Zoo Dossier was a masterwork and is now rightly regarded as a classic. This newly remastered edition includes bonus tracks of three alternate versions of Metal Monster , Space Plucks and Sunrise , together with both tracks from a BBC Radio One John Peel session from March 1971 (previously unreleased on CD)."
    $18.00
  • "Wolfpakk's 'Rise Of The Animal' is a most curious and enjoyable slice of classic Metal. Alpha wolves Michael Voss and Mark Sweeney have again partnered up to bring more Metal mayhem to the masses via their third chapter of their all star project.Where else can you find Don Dokken, Michael Kiske, David Reese, Joe Lynn Turner and Marc Storace all singing on the same album? Where else can one hope to find Jeff Watson, Bernie Tormé, John Norum, Doug Aldrich and Axel Rudi Pell throwing down guitar tracks on the same disc?Not to mention stickmen the quality of Simon Phillips, Mike Terrana, Chris Slade, and Mark Schulman - yeah, this record is packed from beginning to end with talent and Voss and Sweeney have written a fun filled bunch of heavy hitting tracks on which their guests can perform.The fireworks commence on 'Rider Of The Storm', being driven down the slalom by Mike Terrana's ferocious drums, and guitarist Jeff Watson (Night Ranger) and vocalist Andi Deris (Halloween) take this tune straight to the stratosphere. When Watson rips into his solo, you'd better hold on to your seat - damn, I wish this guy would put out more of his great playing.Marc Storace of Krokus is up next, and 'Sock It To Me' is one of those silly and fun romps that can make hard rock so much fun when properly done. Michael Voss handles the six string duties and he righteously tears it up. The rock onslaught continues with 'Monkey On Your Back', and Danger Danger's Ted Poley takes over the microphone and what separates this from most all star projects is first, that the songs all hold up, and the performances are all passionate and on the mark. Ryan Roxie of Alice Cooper's band handles the sizzling six string duties and Mark Schulman (Foreigner, Billy Idol) plays some killer, killer drums.Things slow down for the intro of 'Highlands' and then the rock kicks back in with Joe Lynn Turner and Bernie Tormé's turn - Pablo Allen (Skiltron) supplies the bagpipes, and when Tormé uncorks his solo you'll be smiling ear to ear, it brings an Irish tear of joy to my eye. Another winner. 'Black Wolf' is a hard charging thumper that serves as a mission statement of sorts. Rick Altzi of Masterplan takes the mic, and Voss contributes the classic Metal licks. The only thing that gives me pause with this record is the fact that I won't be seeing it on the stage, but hey, I'll take a coalesced rock record just the same.The combination of ex-Accept man David Reese and the King of Europe himself, John Norum delivers just what you'd expect and 'Somewhere Beyond' is the album's best anthem - this is some majestic magic. This track is worth the price of the album - one of my favorite tracks of 2015. Norum's solo is very Schenker-iffic!Talk about combinations, how about Don Dokken and Doug Aldrich? Aldrich scorches the earth with his screaming Les Paul and Dokken Don contributes a very appropriately poppishly melodic chorus. 'Running Out Of Time' would have sounded right at home on the Sunset Strip in the mid 80s.Things get back to harder fare with the thunderous 'Grizzly Man' - you've got veteran vocalist Charlie Huhn helping out on this one, and this is a fine example of teutonic rock. Can you beat the rhythm section of Bob Daisley and Simon Phillips? No, you can't, they are the bomb. Bob - goddamnit, join a rock band, my friend.'High Roller' features the distinctive tub work of Chris Slade, and you can hear why he got the call once again from the AC/DC camp for their huge summer tour. The quality stays high with super singer Michael Kiske (Solo, Unisonic, Halloween) and axe slinger Axel Rudi Pell - when Kiske takes over on the chorus you'll hear why he may be my favorite vocalist in Metal today. Flipping brilliant.What you don't expect to find on the common project album is an epic track, but 'Rise Of The Animal' is just that. Kiosk's roof raising vocals, and Chris Ivo's soaring keyboard work take this to a very special place, and Pell's axe work is equally incendiary. Even at almost nine minutes long this one ends too soon.'Universe' wraps things up with a slow march down melodic metal avenue - Michaela Schober is not a voice I'm familiar with, but I am instantly in love the minute I hear it. A great way to end a very surprisingly pleasant trip through the world of Metal as seen through the eyes of Sweeney and Voss - they've truly outdone themselves with this one." - Metaltalk.net
    $15.00
  • One of the great Italian symphonic prog albums of the 70s. Recommended to fans of Banco and PFM. New mini-lp sleeve edition from Vinyl Magic.
    $18.00
  • New Italian prog band that makes most of the right retro-prog moves. Ubi Maior is heavily influenced by bands like Il Balletto Di Bronzo and Biglietto Per L'Inferno (on the heavier end of the spectrum) as well as displaying a lighter touch a la PFM and Genesis. Keyboardist Gabriele Manzini was also a member of The Watch so I guess that's where that influence comes in. All in all it's a well done nostalgia trip that any fan of Italian prog from the classic era will rightfully embrace. Comes housed in a nice mini-lp sleeve.
    $20.00
  • A new Glass Hammer is like a universal constant.  I can always expect exemplary old school prog rock.  For an old timer like myself Glass Hammer is right in my wheelhouse.  This is their 17th studio album (amazing!) .  If you are unfamiliar with the band you should know it revolves around the core of bassist Steve Babb and keyboardist Fred Schendel.  There have been a lot of musicians through the doors of their studio over the years but somehow they always seem to find an endless supply of them.  The line up seems to be fairly stable at the moment.  Salem Hill mainman Carl Groves handles lead vocals along with Susie Bogdanowicz returning as well.  Guitars are handled by Kamran Alan Shikoh and drums by Aaron Raulston.Glass Hammer music is a reverential amalgam of Yes, ELP, Kansas and what the hell throw in a little bit of Genesis.  Steve and Fred proudly wear their influences on their sleeves.  Want wicked keyboard pyrotechnics?  Fred brings the thunder.  In fact they all do.  The Breaking Of The World arrives with epic length tracks and audiophile quality sound.  I wouldn't want it any other way.  BUY OR DIE!
    $12.00
  • Japanese mini-LP sleeve at a bargain price. K2 24 bit remastered to boot. This 1982 release is really a pop album - buy this for the collection only.
    $13.00
  • "Archer are a hard rock/metal trio from Santa Cruz, California, consisting of Dylan Rose (guitar, vocals), David De Silva (bass), and Keyhan Moini (drums), with their third album Culling the Weak set to be released by Metalville Records. Though these guys are still pretty young, they've toured with the likes of Doro, HellYeah, Black Label Society, and are soon going out on the road with Annihilator, so the experience they are getting is surely helping them out in every way. Culling the Weak is an enjoyable platter of metal, compact with 8 catchy tunes filled with crunchy guitar riffs, blazing leads, pinch harmonics galore, powerful bass, and nimble drumming. Can't ask for more than that!Rose is pretty much the focal point, his inventive riffing seeming to draw inspiration from Iommi, Wylde, Dimebag, Mustaine, and Rhoades, and while his vocals aren't necessarily the strongpoint of Archer's sound, his gruff style more than fits the bill. Memorable riffs and a sizzling solo drive the anthemic title track, while "Belief" and "A World of One" feature can't miss melodies and arrangements that are almost like a meeting of Thin Lizzy & Black Sabbath. Other hot tracks include the raucous "Dawn of Dilution" and closer "My Atrocity", the latter featuring some lovely acoustic guitar during the intro and then loads of heavy riffs, gymnastic rhythms, blistering lead guitar, and passionate vocals.Overall, Culling the Weak shows a trio that is firing on all cylinders and ready to be taken seriously on the hard rock & metal circuit. With just 8 songs, this one doesn't wear out its welcome or contain filler, just rock solid from start to finish. Make sure you check this one out and also be sure to look for Archer at a live venue near you in the very near future." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $14.00
  • 1977's Couleurs Naturelles was the final album for the quintet but what an album.  Violinist David Rose makes his presence felt right away with the opening track.  He's no longer a featured guest - he's out in front, soloing just as much as guitar and keys.  If you are a fan of Jean-Luc Ponty's classic 70s fusion albums you'll love this.  Killer stuff from beginning to end.  Japanese SHM-CD format in a mini-LP sleeve.
    $27.00