Le Ver Dans Le Fruit (2CD)

Le Ver Dans Le Fruit (2CD)

BY Nemo

(Customer Reviews)
$22.00
$ 13.20
SKU: PPRCD014
Label:
Progressive Promotion
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"Are we being manipulated? Who would benefit from us, to follow pre-established rules? Careless. As sheeps. Political parties? Religious organisations? Commercial companies? TV networks? Beware of everything, even NEMO...

NEMO is one of the leading Prog Rock bands in France, and after 13 years of existence they conquered the world community of Prog lovers with their previous albums (Si, Barbares, R€volu$ion…). Their 8th studio album is about every kind of manipulation. On 2 CDs, 12 songs, they warn you about everyone, even them! Musically you will hear a varied and strong blend of what Nemo is all about, featuring a big dose of experimentation and new exploration. Beware of this album, you will succumb to its charms! "

CD1:
01. Stipant Luporum 2.01
02. Trojan (Le ver dans le fruit) 8.53
03. Milgram, 1960 5.59
04. Verset XV 7.55
05. Un pied dans la tombe 7.11
06. Neuro-Market 6.34
07. Le fruit de la peur 9.43

CD2:
01. A la une 5.08
02. Triste fable 7.46
03. Allah Deus 5.08
04. Opium 9.10
05. Arma Diania 17.19

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