King Crimson Songbook Vol. 2

SKU: INK7727
Label:
Inner Knot
Category:
Jazz
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"Drummer Ian Wallace (King Crimson, Jackson Brown, Don Henley, Bonnie Raitt) is joined by Jody Nardone and Tim Landers, and special guest Mel Collins, on this masterful interpretation of Crimson classics which is sure to please King Crimson fans and jazz aficionados alike. Volume Two takes the CJ3 a step further in its interpretations of the King Crimson catalog.

These songs represent the final recordings in this life by the extraordinary drummer Ian Wallace. They represent the culmination of a lifelong dream and years of study, devotion, hard work and passion for the drums. They honor his past and his love of the music made with, and made by, his brothers in King Crimson. They celebrate his love of jazz. They are a beautiful swan song from an incredible musician.

Volume Two is a slight departure from CJ3's first release, finding the trio taking more liberties with the material. The listener will hear more experimentation in the playing as well as the arrangements. The recording features ex-Crimson saxophonist Mel Collins on two pieces and finds Jody Nardone lending his vocals to a track. Like Volume One, Volume Two is, as it was intended, more experiment than a tribute album. It stands alone as a beautiful, and perfectly performed jazz album, as well as a medium to experience Crimson in music's most improvisational art form."

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