Judgement

SKU: KOCCD4225
Label:
Music For Nations/Koch
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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Excellent UK doom metal band highly influenced by Pink Floyd.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
Hands-down the best album from these guys, IMHO. Simply breathtaking music which, although is highly influenced by Pink Floyd, still retains enough originality to fully stand on its own. The emotional punch these songs pack is simply stunning. Highest recommendation. Leyth
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:57
Rate: 
0
Hands-down the best album from these guys, IMHO. Simply breathtaking music which, although is highly influenced by Pink Floyd, still retains enough originality to fully stand on its own. The emotional punch these songs pack is simply stunning. Highest recommendation. Leyth
You must login or register to post reviews.
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