Inner Sanctum

SKU: PARADIGMS081
Label:
Paradigms Recordings
Category:
Psychedelic
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Four mammoth length drugged out tracks that will blast you off to the deepest part of the cosmos.

"The fifth instalment of the Cosmic odyssey on Paradigms. As as you will surely now expect, it's a potent kraut mammoth of the highest order. Four towering psych beasts inhabit this album, commanding 74 blissful minutes. You can hear one of them below.

Only previously available on cassette, 'The Inner Sanctum' is now available as a luscious, limited digi-pak album, laden with glorious artwork and some of the band's hardest cuts. Only 500 of these wonders are available. THE COSMIC DEAD on top of their freak-out game, right here.."

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