Inget Nytt Under Solen (Remaster)

Kaipa's second album didn't present anything radically different from the first album and that's a good thing.  Its simply beautiful symphonic rock in the tradition of Yes and Genesis.  The only negative is that keyboardist Hans Lundin sings in Swedish but his voice is strong so its not unpleasant.  I'm not quite sure why Decca didn't force them to sing in English. 

This 2015 remastered edition arrives with four bonus tracks.

""Inget Nytt Under Solen" was KAIPA's 2nd release and is another wonderful release which must be heard. "Inget Nytt Under Solen" has all the elements you would want in a progressive rock band... beautiful captivating songs with superb musicianship. Ronie Stolt's (FLOWER KINGS) impregnates this album with his accurate and lively guitar work, Tomas Eriksson handles most of the vocals and adds some real solid punchy bass lines, Hans Lundin brings his analog keyboard wizardry while Ingemar Bergman delivers some solid percussion throughout. All the songs as very well constructed and are given lots of space the breathe and create some lovely atmospheres. This album opens with an epic 21 minute suite "Skenet Bedrar" which is simply brilliant (must be heard!!!). Vocals are in Swedish except for the bonus numbers which introduce the world to English lyrics in an attempt to attract the world to KAIPA's talents. Overall I love KAIPA's music and "Inget Nytt Under Solen" is a solid offering which fans of FLOWER KINGS, ANYONE'S DAUGHTER etc. will love and treasure..." - ProgArchives

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