I / Time

SKU: LE1074
Label:
Laser's Edge
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Vly began as strangers sending 1's and 0's across the Atlantic Ocean. British-based guitarist Karl Demata had a vague idea and a few demos, when a friend put him in touch with New York singer / artist Keith Gladysz. Keith began working on the demos, adding a more melodic, dream-like and decidedly indie sensibility. "It was a new way to work", says Gladysz. "The music and collaborative art I've made always started with people I knew, and creating naturally came out of that understanding. That's not the case with Vly. We managed to make an album without ever meeting. There was no gauge or reference point except for the music. It was a total shot in the dark".

The sound of Vly shooting in the dark hits elements of progressive rock, classic rock, folk, early-Floydian psychedelia, intimate pop melodies, massive walls of epic guitar riffage, post-classical, post-rock and electronic music. And it's the diverse background of the members that lead to the breadth of their sound.

The progressive sentiment of Italian keyboardist Elisa Montaldo quickly attracted the ear of Demata. "The first time I heard Elisa play" says Karl "I knew we had to be in a band. Her innate melodic approach and instinctual understanding and knowledge of 'anything prog' is simply remarkable".

"Karl asked me to join the project at the very beginning" Elisa picks up: "My idea of prog is somehow more vintage, more typical 70's Italian style. After various experiments on arrangements and sounds, I went to Karl's studio to record most of the keyboards, where we found the right balance".

Connecting with strangers, and expanding circles of mutual friends became the pattern for Vly. Karl next recruited experienced bass player Chris Heilmann who worked together previously in Crippled Black Phoenix. Chris provided a solid backbone with a more classic rock attitude.

Demata doesn't hold back when talking about Sweden-based musician Mattias Olsson. "He is simply a genius. And he's never predictable as a drummer. Mattias also contributed some vintage keys and odd analog noises, which have a definitive effect on the bands sound. A common friend described him as a 'lateral thinker', and I can't think of a better way to describe him."

Vly makes good on the futuristic dreams of the late 1990's, when promises of international recording sessions via the Internet excited incredulous musicians. Now that it's a reality (thanks to Dropbox and Skype), the method may be less glamorously sci-fi than one had hoped; still, they get the job done.

"I always disliked the cliches about music as a universal language, and more recently about the Internet bringing people together", explains Keith. "I'm even more uncomfortable with those sentiments now, since Vly proved them true".

Vly's debut album, I / (Time) is available on the Laser's Edge imprint September 18, 2015. It's engineered and produced by Karl Demata, with additional production by Keith Gladysz and Mattias Olsen, and audiophile mastering by Bob Katz.

VLY is:
Keith Gladysz (Diet Kong, Typical Reptiles) - Vocals.
Karl Demata (ex-Crippled Black Phoenix, Karl Demata Band) - Guitars, synths, programming.
Elisa Montaldo (Il Tempio Delle Clessidre) - keyboards and synths.
Chris Heilmann (ex-Crippled Black Phoenix, Bernie Torme', Shark Island) – Bass.
Mattias Olsson (ex-Änglagård. White Willow, Necromonkey) - Drums & keyboard
 

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They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. 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  • Previously unreleased live show from November 4, 1972. This is the post Uli Trepte lineup with his replacement Bruno Schaab on bass. The band jams out three mega-long versions of "Oxymoron", "Baby Cake Walk" and "Ooga Booga"."After Uli Trepte had left the band, Guru Guru had one of their first gigs with Bruno Schaab on bass in the assembly hall of the Germania-Heim in Wiesbaden on November 4th, 1972. They played in front of about 200 to 300 people. The whole concert was recorded expertly and in stereo, with the consent of the band and the promoter, Robert Huth, by Muck Krieger, sharing a flat with Xhol (Caravan), a band they were friends with and which had just broken up. The equipment used – an Uher tape recorder CR 124 and Revox microphones – were then state-of-the-art technology. Here you will hear three overlength versions of Guru Guru tracks in a perfect sound quality. They could thus freely display and develop their play without having to keep to the limited playing time of an LP side. The CD was drawn directly from the master tapes."
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