Horn Culture (BLOW OUT PRICE!)

SKU: OJCD314-2
Label:
Milestone
Category:
Jazz
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Horn Culture is a nice spiritual jazz session led by the legendary saxophonist.  It dates back to 1973 and most of the musicians actually plug in.  Yoshiaki Masuo is the guitarist (some of you may know his great "24" album only released in Japan).  Walter Davis is playing electric piano and Bob Crenshaw is on electric bass.  David Lee is on drums and the great Mtume is on percussion.  Worth it just for the near 12 minute "Sais".

Product Review

Red Circle 1
Sat, 2016-01-23 13:45
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0
I saw an edition of this band live at SUNY Binghamton yrs ago and they were even better live than on record. I believe this was followed by a few more releases with more or less the same band. This is Sonny getting into the crossover era a little behind Electric Miles and other bands at that time but trying to maintain a core acoustic sound with his sax and overall band. No wah wah or echoplex\multivider nonsense. What was side 1 is also Sonny's attempt to keep the avant garde side of his sound relevant and side 2 are tunes that are a little more grounded in that 2 of them are covers. Overall the session was successful and an interesting addition to his overall catalog with more to come later.
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Product Review

Red Circle 1
Sat, 2016-01-23 13:45
Rate: 
0
I saw an edition of this band live at SUNY Binghamton yrs ago and they were even better live than on record. I believe this was followed by a few more releases with more or less the same band. This is Sonny getting into the crossover era a little behind Electric Miles and other bands at that time but trying to maintain a core acoustic sound with his sax and overall band. No wah wah or echoplex\multivider nonsense. What was side 1 is also Sonny's attempt to keep the avant garde side of his sound relevant and side 2 are tunes that are a little more grounded in that 2 of them are covers. Overall the session was successful and an interesting addition to his overall catalog with more to come later.
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  • The original version of Rïah Sahïltaahk that was recorded in 1971 is featured on the album 1001° Centigrade (vol. 2). But at the time, its composer, Christian Vander, was unhappy with the arrangement written by the group. This radically new version, adapted to suit the group’s current line-up, is more faithful to the spirit of Magma’s music and its uniquely weird and wonderful prog-rock style."
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  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hardly be called fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.By the mid-70s Three Blind Mice was loosening up just a little bit in terms of the label's scope.  Ako's Dream is an interesting set that was released in 1977.  Suzuki is a bassist and cellist - on this album he is playing cello.  The lineup features two guitarists - one of which is the incredible Kazumi Watanabe.  Lots of electric piano and (gas) even some synthesizer.  The album consists of four long tracks that really hit a groove particularly on a reworking of Gene McDaniel's "Feel Like Makin' Love" which almost has a funky vibe to it with synth washes that take it into a spacey direction.  Its always fun to hear Watanabe on these jazz sessions, lurking in background and then coming to the fore and tearing it up.  Highly recommended.
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  • "As the eerily enticing extended intro to 'Diarabi', the opening track from Goat's 2012 debut World Music, twists and turns into the slightly less eerie but equally enticing main body of the track, it has already become glaringly apparent that this is a very impressive live band at work. Over the twelve tracks on Live Ballroom Ritual you are assaulted by a live show that is complex, bizarre and more often than not, brilliant. Goat are like few other bands around at the moment, or at least few other bands that have gained any sort of wide-ish spread recognition. They are at the forefront of experimental music and for good reason.Following the excellent 'Diarabi', 'Golden Dawn' is like something from another age. They fuse together tribal drums, reminiscent of early Santana, vocals reminiscent of African tribal music, funk guitars and a healthy dose of 70s psychedelic rock. It really is the sum of its parts, each component amalgamated together effortlessly.The band's playing is loose but on point throughout. Although coming across as totally free-form, there's a definite sense of purpose in every note they play. Despite more or less every song here being stretched far beyond its recorded length, very rarely does this feel tiresome. Whereas those who were around in the 70s may think that self-indulgence has been done and many others just shudder at the thought of it, it's rarely even an option these days. In musical climate where everything tends to veer towards a formula and where too many live acts just recreate their songs as they are on record, distracting us with glossy production values, the sense of adventure and old-school musicianship displayed by Goat is a more than welcome change in direction. This is original, invigorating music, played in an often overlooked manner. It's indulgent, but it's not self-gratifying. The listener is the one being indulged.Trying to categorise Goat's music would be a hopeless exercise. Where one second they're unleashing the crazed psych-disco of 'Disco Fever', the next they're laying down the slow, infectious groove of 'Let It Bleed'. The groove is led by guitar work which is largely reminiscent of Tinariwen's Saharan-blues. Though influences are notable throughout, they are moulded and worked to fit within the band's own singular vision of fusion music. By the end of 'Let It Bleed', jazz trumpets have taken the lead and the song is off heading down a different road. Even if you've heard their studio work, their live set is still ridden with surprise turns.It's a rare occurrence that a live album truly seizes your attention and presents itself as a piece of work to be judged on an equal footing as a studio record. Live Ballroom Ritual however, is one of those occurrences. Obviously, to see them live, with their masks, energy and grand sense of theatre would be even more impressive, but as long as you can remove that from your mind, you're not likely to hear many better live albums. Generally, live albums serve as a reminder of a tour you attended or as an addition to your collection of a favourite band's recordings. Obviously there are exceptions and great live albums do exist, but it remains hugely impressive for a live album to be this enjoyable. Especially when you don't know the band's work inside out. That is the true testament to a band's live credentials.'Run To Your Mama' best embodies how good a live album this is. The huge guitar chord that beckons the song in really grabs you by the particulars and whisks you along with its primal energy. Where too many live albums try, and fail, to recreate the atmosphere of being at the gig with overly loud crowd noise and every bit of chat from the band, Live Ballroom Ritual makes the music the sole focus. As a result of this, you feel more like you're actually there than any crowd atmosphere will ever manage.For the sake of finding some kind of downside to the album, 'Goatlord' is a bit dull and 'Disco Fever' should perhaps be a bit shorter. Other than that though, they've pretty much nailed it. Of course, by the very nature of the music, Goat will be far from everybody's cup of tea but it's a cup that everyone should try at least once.The pinnacle of the album is 'Det Som Aldrig Förändras - Kristallen Den Fina'. It's an eleven minute amalgamation of everything that Goat do; and it just so happens that they do almost all of it really rather well. Its introduction and monumental riff could almost be on a Kyuss record and from here it meanders fearlessly into every corner of psychedelic rock. Put simply, it's fucking brilliant. That's also the best way to describe Goat and the best way to describe this album. Listen to it now." - The 405
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  • "‘Idiosynchratically beautiful’. These are two words that have stuck with me for nearly 20 years and which I recall almost every time I hear or read the name Arcturus. These words were quoted on an advert for the Norwegian band’s 1997 release, ‘La Masquerade Infernale’ within an issue of either Terrorizer or Metal Hammer magazine; I can’t remember which. What I do remember was that I was deeply into a stage of black metal discovery at the time and this quote resonated with me for some reason. I took the punt and received the album as a Christmas present. It wasn’t love at first listen; instead it was a slow and steady slog that has ended in a lasting and deep love affair. It was the track ‘Ad Astra’ that was the catalyst for repeat listens. 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However, for one reason or another it has taken until 2015 for a new original recording to see the light of day, a development that has been greeted with great euphoria amongst the loyal Arcturus following.Arcturus version 2015 is comprised of Steinar Sverd Johnsen (keys), Hellhammer (drums), Knut Magne Valle (guitar), Hugh ‘Skoll’ Mingay (bass) and ICS Vortex (vocals). Together, they have created an album very much worthy of their lofty status and one that I would argue just about manages to match the quality of ‘La Masquerade Infernale’. The only reason I hedge my bets and say ‘just about’ is because I’ve only had about three days with ‘Arcturian’ as opposed to the 18 years I’ve had to enjoy ‘La Masquerade Infernale’. That said, I’ve listened to ‘Arcturian’ more times than I care to mention in recent days and it gives me chills on each and every listen. It is complex, quirky, brilliantly composed and professionally executed. I have no doubt that with even more time and attention, it’ll delight and captivate me even more than it does already.The one thing that perhaps I wasn’t expecting was the sheer amount of melody and accessibility that ‘Arcturian’ displays. It’s no exaggeration to say that for all of the complexity and raw heaviness, almost every track on the album contains a melody, lead vocal or some kind of hook that makes me sit up and take real notice. When I listen to new music, I have a tendency to make an ‘oooh’ noise and smile broadly if something excites me. I suspect that there will be some of you out there who do something similar. On ‘Arcturian’, I admit to ‘ooh’-ing all over the place.One of main reasons why this album feels so melodic and accessible is, I believe down to vocalist ICS Vortex. Yes he is an acquired taste but so unique is his delivery and so impressive is his range that seemingly very little is off-limits. He complements the music beautifully, managing sound both majestic but also a little unstable, as if he could spiral out of control at any moment. I mean, at times, he sounds like he’s yodelling for heaven’s sake; it’s superb.Onto the compositions themselves, they are all dense, multi-layered affairs that contain an abundance of richness. There are no songs that tend to extend over six minute mark and yet, such is the ambition of Arcturus that it feels like a million different ideas are injected into each composition, testing the listener and toying with them at every turn. I strongly suspect that this has been done with a certain playful, yet mischievous intent. Those strong Vaudervillian overtones of the band’s past make a welcome return, as do a number of various influences that pull Arcturus away from being simply discarded as a black metal band. As they demonstrate on ‘Arcturian’, there are elements of black metal to their underlying sound but they deliver so much more that to pigeonhole them in such a way would be inaccurate and disingenuous.Opening track, ‘The Arcturian Sign’, starts off somewhat disconcertingly with weird electronic noises and sounds. It’s a typically eccentric beginning which soon gives way to those unmistakable vocals of ICS Vortex and, at its core, a black metal meets prog composition. Dominated by powerful synths and relentless double pedal drumming, those odd sounds like laser guns nevertheless re-surface throughout. But within the tumult and idiosyncrasies is a really catchy, hook-laden chorus.‘Crashland’ has a light and breezy feel to it, taking in influences from space rock, folk music and more extreme climes. The sweeping synths are immediately reminiscent of the ‘La Masquerade Infernale’ era, as they are during my personal standout track, ‘Game Over’ with its addictive melodies and the way it builds and morphs so elegantly from one guise to another almost imperceptibly, ending in a crescendo of sorts that elicits another ‘ooh’ from my lips.‘Angst’ is a powerful and more extreme slab of metal, dominated by a blistering tempo, tortured screams atop another strong synth melody and the threat of a descent into chaos on more than one occasion. ‘Warp’ on the other hand introduces more electronic influences but has such an imposing and catchy melody that it’s impossible to ignore. ‘Demon’ has demonstrable Gothic synth pop overtones whereas ‘Pale’ delights with a marvellous driving central riff, a great chorus of sorts and some of the most varied and brilliant vocals on the entire record. The album ends with ‘Bane’, a track that further backs up the gorgeous ‘The Journey’ by providing amongst other things, some truly beautiful and subtle acoustic guitar playing which is a real joy.For all that, I have to say that ‘Arcturian’ is an album that’s best enjoyed in its entirety rather than picking and choosing individual songs. The album has a distinct flow and overall feel that helps to make it as special as it is, something that could be lost if listened to in a piecemeal manner.For the sake of balance, my only small gripe relates to the production which I think is a little on the weak side and robs some of the aforementioned richness from the music. Occasionally, the layers of music come together is a slightly messy muddle of impenetrable white noise which is a bit disappointing. But then again, there’s a certain ‘old-school’ charm to the mix too, reminding me of their heyday more than once. Maybe therefore, the production is entirely deliberate, those naughty scamps.It’s almost impossible sum up ‘Arcturian’ in a concise manner and do it the justice it deserves, except to say that if you’re a fan of Arcturus at their most original, challenging, audacious and quirky, prepare to take ‘Arcturian’ straight to your heart." - Man Of Much Metal
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  • Doom metal as a genre seems to have been fairly dormant for the past decade.  Years ago we offered a CD which featured a collection of demos by a defunct Swedish band called Sorcerer.  The band reformed in 2010 and have finally released their first real album after all these years.  The band is fronted by the great ex-Lions Share vocalist Andy Engberg who went on to work with a ton of bands over the years.  Doom pretty much follows a formulaic approach and Sorcerer doesn't really deviate from the tried and true very much.  If you are a fan of Candlemass, Trouble, and of course Black Sabbath this one will be right in your wheelhouse.  Highly recommended. 
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  • Produced by Nick Mason, 1978's Green didn't see any significant changes in direction. It's a solid follow up to Motivation Radio and an easy recommendation. This remastered edition features four bonus tracks.
    $12.00
  • Incendiary trio led by guitarist Hedvig Mollestad Thomassen. This is a tough album to categorize. Its a mind bending instrumental mix of stoner rock and fusion. Ms. Thomassen channels her inner-Hendrix and Iommi in counterpoint to the acoustic upright bass of Ellen Breken and drummer Ivar Loe Bjørnstad. Pure raw guitar driven power that is aggressive but melodic. Highly recommended."Debut album from very exciting new trio led by guitarist Hedvig Mollestad Thomassen. With one foot in heavy rock and one in jazz they effortlessly manage to combine monster riffs and high energy rock´n´roll with progressive and lyrical modern jazz. Fully instrumental apart from the distant shouting in a Melvins cover, "Shoot!" is more song structured than other guitar led trios such as Bushman´s Revenge or Scorch Trio. Ellen Brekken plays electric and acoustic bass and Ivar Loe Bjørnstad is the drummer. The album has a lovely vintage, classic analog feel that surely has something to do with it being recorded live in the studio with the musicians actually playing together. It was mixed by Kai Andersen in Athletic Studio and mastered at Dave Collins Mastering in Los Angeles. We love this band and the album comes highly recommended."
    $18.00