Harmony Of The Spheres

SKU: ECLEC2096
Label:
Esoteric Recordings
Category:
Fusion/Jazz
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Great follow up to Kaleidescope Of Rainbows. An amazing integration of big band and jazz rock. The core band is actually Ian Carr's Nucleus. Other prominent musicians include John Martyn (RIP) on guitar and Barbara Thompson on flute. I believe this may be the first official release on CD (not 100% sure). This is the 24 bit remastered version wich gets all the usual Esoteric magical touches. Highly recommended.

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  • How many of you remember Tritonus?  Back in 1995, there was a Norwegian sampler CD called simply "A Gathering of 8 Norwegian Progressive Metal Bands".  Besides Spiral Architect, Trivial Act, and Manitou there were other bands that managed to score record deals.  Most of them disappeared.  Tritonus was on the sampler.  Despite having some of the strongest material on the CD the band never signed with a label, and despite years of trying, never released any material.  Band leader/virtuoso guitarist Carl August Tidemann would time to time mention that Tritonus was working on its debut, but after almost 2 decades everyone pretty much took it with a grain of salt.  Well...better late than never!If you've been listening to prog metal for a long time you know that the sound has changed a bit over the years.  Tritonus' debut turns back the hands of time.  This is a stunning example of prog metal the way we used to know it.  Stunning musicianship with plenty of jolts of technicality.  At this point, the lineup has changed over the years.  In addition to Tidemann, Tritonus now consists of Rolf Kristensen (vocals), Ole Devold (drums) and Thor-Axel Eriksen (guitars).  Lots of guests contribute (my guess is many of these were past members).  Keyboards (courtesy of Circus Maximus' Lasse Finbraten) tend to be put to good use - you hear the occasional solo but mostly its there for texture - the twin guitars weave together with incredible proficiency and dominate.  I have to point out the vocals of Rolf Kristensen.  This guy is amazing!Its a shame that its taken so many years for Tritonus to release this.  Its quite a great album and in a way it makes me a bit sad.  Had it come out 15 years ago, they could have easily risen through the scene.  We are lucky we have it.  Is it closure for Tritonus or the opening of a new era?  Let's hope for the later.  They deserve a better fate and damn I'd want to hear more music from them.  BUY OR DIE!
    $15.00
  • The Japanese East Wind label was active in the 70s and into the early 80s.  This was a jazz label that focused on Japanese artists but also covered many popular US players.  While not as overtly audiophile as Three Blind Mice, the East Wind label was always noted for immaculate reference quality production.Universal Japan has released 72 titles from the East Wind catalog in extremely limited editions.  We've cherry picked those titles that we think are of interest to our customer base.Terumasa Hino is the legendary Japanese trumpet player who is still going strong today.  He has played around the world and played with the best.  Unfortunately he's probably best known in Japan.  When he launched his career in the late 60s he was playing pretty traditional straight ahead jazz.  Once he struck out with his own ensembles his music became more focused on spiritual jazz, frequently plugging in and crossing over into fusion.  Hogiuta was recorded in NY in 1976 and is one of the all time great kosmigroov albums.  The personnel consists of Terumasa Hino ( trumpet, flugel horn, percussion, voice), Cecil McBee (acoustic bass, voice), Motohiko Hino (drums, percussion, voice), M'tume (percussion, voice).  This album is totally cosmic.  It kicks off with the intense side long title piece that features McBee and the percussionists locking into a groove while Hino does his Miles-like best and its pretty damn great.  The album has stellar production.  If your system is set up right you will hear a deep soundstage with precise placement of intruments.  Cool panning effects with throw voices all around.  An incredible spacious recording that will really show off your system.  This is one of those albums that demands you fire up the vaporizer and dim the lights.  Hino had many magnificent albums through out his career but for my personal taste this is the one.  BUY OR DIE!
    $16.00
  • Remastered edition of the iconic first album from Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow. At the time frontman Ronnie James Dio was an unknown singer from an upstate New York band called Elf. This released turned the hard rock world upside down. "Man On The Silver Mountain", "Catch The Rainbow", "Still I'm Sad"....it didn't get better than this...ever!
    $5.00
  • The late Michael Hedges was one of the great visionary guitarists of our lifetimes. He used tapping techniques on acoustic guitar to create a wall of sound. He was influenced by John Fahey and Leo Kottke and made us all rethink what can possibly be done with an acoustic guitar.  Introspective but addictive.  If you have any interest in guitar you need to hear this album.
    $8.00
  • Technical death metal for fans of Necrophagist and Obscura."The 3rd full length from The Faceless is easily one of the most anticipated albums of the decade for the extreme Metal Genre. This is the bands 1st release in over 4 years. Autotheism is a semi conceptual record following a mans journey of self discovery and transformation into the all powerful God of his reality. Musically, Autotheism is expansive in all directions. It is a thought provoking roller coaster with the occasional sledge hammer to the skull and contains more dynamics and diversity than any offering presented by The Faceless to date. This is forward thinking music that is beyond the scope of anything currently out there."
    $11.00
  • "Ram-Zet was formed in 1998 -- and seven years later, in 2005, listeners were still struggling to categorize the Norwegian combo's ambitious, risk-taking music. Is Intra symphonic black metal, goth metal, alt metal or progressive metal? Truth be told, this 2005 release is all of those things. Leader/founder/lead singer Zet's raspy screech and the band's effective use of blastbeats give Intra a certain amount of black metal appeal, but female lead vocalist Sfinx favors an ethereal, darkly romantic approach that is extremely goth -- and the influence of industrial rock and progressive metal asserts itself as well. Put all of these things together, and you have an intense yet generally melodic band that isn't afraid to bring something fresh and original to the Scandinavian metal scene. Of course, ambition and good intentions don't always pay off -- some experimental bands have the best of intentions but end up providing erratic, wildly inconsistent albums. Those are the types of bands that will get an A for their intentions but a C or D for the final product (in contrast to the artists who aren't very original but still get an A or B for albums that are solid, focused, and inspired, if derivative). Thankfully, Ram-Zet's good intentions pay off in a major way on Intra. This 53-minute CD never sounds confused or unfocused; Zet sees to it that all of the different elements fit together nicely and form a cohesive, lucid whole. That said, the listeners who will get the most out of Intra are those with eclectic tastes. If one is broad-minded enough to listen to Cradle of Filth or Dimmu Borgir one minute and Black Tape for a Blue Girl or Diva Destruction the next -- followed by Dream Theater as well as Nine Inch Nails -- Intra offers considerable rewards." - Allmusic Guide
    $9.00
  • HOLY %&@#!!! This disc is a total monster. Biomechanical is a UK-based band led by vocalist John K. (late of Balance Of Power). Imagine a mix of Nevermore, Judas Priest and Queensryche with an added subtle touch of technicality - a highly listenable trash/power blend. This is massive sounding music designed to penetrate and clear out all the cobwebs in your skull.
    $6.00
  • Now here is a killer prog metal release from Australia.  Mechanical Organic is a new band led by former Vauxdivhl keyboardist Eddie Katz and ex-Neue Regel/Fracture vocalist David Bellion.Its the second part of a conceptual work.  If you are familiar with Bellion's voice you know he bears an uncanny resemblance to vintage Geoff Tate.  Katz has had other projects since Vauxdivhl, mostly in the experimental metal realm.  This Global Hive is an incredible marriage of different aspects of prog.  The result is a band that has created a sound that sounds like a mash up of Zero Hour and Queensryche.  Within the context of Mechanical Organic, Bellion has toned down the Tate-isms but the similarities are there.  He's a bit of a vocal chameleon - add in some Erik Rosvold and Chris Salinas and you'll get the overall picture.  Think Towers Of Avarice meets Operation: Mindcrime.  The music is melodic and atmospheric and full on prog metal.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • Third album from a band that is essentially a mash up of members from Sieges Even, Sun Caged and Dreamscape.  Their music carries on very much in the style of the later Sieges Even albums.  In other words progressive rock that leans towards the heavier side of the spectrum.  Rush, Rabin-era Yes, Saga, and Dream Theater come to mind as influences.  Quite melodic and if you are so inclined you'll hear some incredible chops from guitarist Markus Steffen.  The band corraled Stream Of Passion's Marcela Bovio for a guest vocal appearance, dueting with Arno Menses.This is the deluxe 2CD edition.  It sports a really cool looking 3D cover.  The bonus CD is a live concert recorded in Mannheim in 2012.
    $19.00
  • Its been four years since this British ensemble's debut album.  Been a long time coming but there have been a number of personnel changes in the band.  Founding members Alex Crispin (vox/keys) and bassist Dan Pomlett left the band, while guitarist Nicholas Richards switched over to bass.  While the band went through a state of flux their core sound didn't really change a hell of a lot.  Yeah maybe its pared down a bit but it is still steeped in the sounds of the early 70s.  Mellotron, organ and reeds abound.  Guitar is a bit more dominant but still with that retro Vertigo vibe.  Vocals only appear on one track and they are OK.  Think in terms of an instrumental VDGG in a massive jam session with members of Soft Machine and Eloy.  As if!  I will be hard pressed to come across a better progressive rock album released in 2012.  BUY OR DIE!
    $13.00
  • "Mattias “IA” Eklundh is a Swedish guitarist, founder of the eclectic Metal band, Freak Kitchen, a band of which I am certainly a fan. The Smorgasbord is his third album under the moniker of Freak Guitar, essentially a solo album, and isn’t one I would quite classify as Metal. It is more of a guitar aficionado’s type of recording with a wide variety of types of music, ranging from nice acoustic pieces, songs that could fit in on a Rippington’s album, to heavier songs with lightning-fast playing and IA’s signature guitar sound and style. For the most part, it is an instrumental album as well. At 40 tracks, I simply cannot do a track by track review but will hit on some of the songs I thought to be highlights. Opener Amphibians Night Out has quite a bit of guitar wizardry over a dance-type beat. The second song on the album is Musth, an alternative-type Metal song with interesting playing and quite a bit going on. Apparently there is comb involved. IA’s take on the AC/DC song Hells Bells is well executed and gives me a new perspective on the song. Friedrichs Wahnbriefe is a cool, sort of chaotic, tune and very well executed. IA’s interpretation on Mambo Italiano of the mambo style is certainly interesting and displays some of his more traditional soloing. Mind Your Step has a nice riff throughout, a bit heavy, sort of something OSI might do. His take on the song That’s Amore is very cool and Metal. Keep it in the Dojo offers complexity in both the guitar lines and the drumming by Ranjit Barot. Mandur and Morgan’s Camel Safari is a song that easily could be mistaken for one on a Freak Kitchen album. Kali Ghat features a 23/16 time signature, making for a weird, different flow than most Westerns are used to hearing. Meralgia Paresthetica‘s drum tracks are played by Morgan Ågren and he is absolutely amazing: precise, powerful, intricate, and delicate are all words I would use to describe his playing here. IA is certainly a master at his craft and an amazing musician, not simply a guitarist. The Smorgasbord is a challenging album and has significant variety, a true smorgasbord of musical styles. It certainly is not a Metal album, but there are things on here that we may appreciate. For “heavier” stuff from IA, I definitely recommend Freak Kitchen, the album Organic to be specific. I hear the sound in a METAL way." - We Love Metal
    $15.00
  • "‘Idiosynchratically beautiful’. These are two words that have stuck with me for nearly 20 years and which I recall almost every time I hear or read the name Arcturus. These words were quoted on an advert for the Norwegian band’s 1997 release, ‘La Masquerade Infernale’ within an issue of either Terrorizer or Metal Hammer magazine; I can’t remember which. What I do remember was that I was deeply into a stage of black metal discovery at the time and this quote resonated with me for some reason. I took the punt and received the album as a Christmas present. It wasn’t love at first listen; instead it was a slow and steady slog that has ended in a lasting and deep love affair. It was the track ‘Ad Astra’ that was the catalyst for repeat listens. Full of drama, avant-garde vaudevillian oddness and a compelling crescendo, it impressed me and forced me to listen to the remainder of the album more than perhaps I might otherwise have done.It is arguable that in the intervening years, Arcturus have never managed to hit the heights of ‘La Masquerade Infernale’. Neither 2002’s ‘The Sham Mirrors’ nor ‘Sideshow Symphonies’ spoke to me in the same way and despite containing some outstanding moments, I came away both times with feelings of slight disappointment. And that, as they say was that. In terms of original studio albums, nothing has been released since; indeed after the release of ‘Shipwrecked in Oslo’ in 2006, the band called it quits with the individual members going on to do different things. And so it has remained until now.Rumours were rife from around 2011 when various members made comments that alluded to a resurrection of the band and later that year the rumours were confirmed. However, for one reason or another it has taken until 2015 for a new original recording to see the light of day, a development that has been greeted with great euphoria amongst the loyal Arcturus following.Arcturus version 2015 is comprised of Steinar Sverd Johnsen (keys), Hellhammer (drums), Knut Magne Valle (guitar), Hugh ‘Skoll’ Mingay (bass) and ICS Vortex (vocals). Together, they have created an album very much worthy of their lofty status and one that I would argue just about manages to match the quality of ‘La Masquerade Infernale’. The only reason I hedge my bets and say ‘just about’ is because I’ve only had about three days with ‘Arcturian’ as opposed to the 18 years I’ve had to enjoy ‘La Masquerade Infernale’. That said, I’ve listened to ‘Arcturian’ more times than I care to mention in recent days and it gives me chills on each and every listen. It is complex, quirky, brilliantly composed and professionally executed. I have no doubt that with even more time and attention, it’ll delight and captivate me even more than it does already.The one thing that perhaps I wasn’t expecting was the sheer amount of melody and accessibility that ‘Arcturian’ displays. It’s no exaggeration to say that for all of the complexity and raw heaviness, almost every track on the album contains a melody, lead vocal or some kind of hook that makes me sit up and take real notice. When I listen to new music, I have a tendency to make an ‘oooh’ noise and smile broadly if something excites me. I suspect that there will be some of you out there who do something similar. On ‘Arcturian’, I admit to ‘ooh’-ing all over the place.One of main reasons why this album feels so melodic and accessible is, I believe down to vocalist ICS Vortex. Yes he is an acquired taste but so unique is his delivery and so impressive is his range that seemingly very little is off-limits. He complements the music beautifully, managing sound both majestic but also a little unstable, as if he could spiral out of control at any moment. I mean, at times, he sounds like he’s yodelling for heaven’s sake; it’s superb.Onto the compositions themselves, they are all dense, multi-layered affairs that contain an abundance of richness. There are no songs that tend to extend over six minute mark and yet, such is the ambition of Arcturus that it feels like a million different ideas are injected into each composition, testing the listener and toying with them at every turn. I strongly suspect that this has been done with a certain playful, yet mischievous intent. Those strong Vaudervillian overtones of the band’s past make a welcome return, as do a number of various influences that pull Arcturus away from being simply discarded as a black metal band. As they demonstrate on ‘Arcturian’, there are elements of black metal to their underlying sound but they deliver so much more that to pigeonhole them in such a way would be inaccurate and disingenuous.Opening track, ‘The Arcturian Sign’, starts off somewhat disconcertingly with weird electronic noises and sounds. It’s a typically eccentric beginning which soon gives way to those unmistakable vocals of ICS Vortex and, at its core, a black metal meets prog composition. Dominated by powerful synths and relentless double pedal drumming, those odd sounds like laser guns nevertheless re-surface throughout. But within the tumult and idiosyncrasies is a really catchy, hook-laden chorus.‘Crashland’ has a light and breezy feel to it, taking in influences from space rock, folk music and more extreme climes. The sweeping synths are immediately reminiscent of the ‘La Masquerade Infernale’ era, as they are during my personal standout track, ‘Game Over’ with its addictive melodies and the way it builds and morphs so elegantly from one guise to another almost imperceptibly, ending in a crescendo of sorts that elicits another ‘ooh’ from my lips.‘Angst’ is a powerful and more extreme slab of metal, dominated by a blistering tempo, tortured screams atop another strong synth melody and the threat of a descent into chaos on more than one occasion. ‘Warp’ on the other hand introduces more electronic influences but has such an imposing and catchy melody that it’s impossible to ignore. ‘Demon’ has demonstrable Gothic synth pop overtones whereas ‘Pale’ delights with a marvellous driving central riff, a great chorus of sorts and some of the most varied and brilliant vocals on the entire record. The album ends with ‘Bane’, a track that further backs up the gorgeous ‘The Journey’ by providing amongst other things, some truly beautiful and subtle acoustic guitar playing which is a real joy.For all that, I have to say that ‘Arcturian’ is an album that’s best enjoyed in its entirety rather than picking and choosing individual songs. The album has a distinct flow and overall feel that helps to make it as special as it is, something that could be lost if listened to in a piecemeal manner.For the sake of balance, my only small gripe relates to the production which I think is a little on the weak side and robs some of the aforementioned richness from the music. Occasionally, the layers of music come together is a slightly messy muddle of impenetrable white noise which is a bit disappointing. But then again, there’s a certain ‘old-school’ charm to the mix too, reminding me of their heyday more than once. Maybe therefore, the production is entirely deliberate, those naughty scamps.It’s almost impossible sum up ‘Arcturian’ in a concise manner and do it the justice it deserves, except to say that if you’re a fan of Arcturus at their most original, challenging, audacious and quirky, prepare to take ‘Arcturian’ straight to your heart." - Man Of Much Metal
    $16.00
  • "Fifteen years doesn’t seem like that long ago, but at the time I was a 17 year-old who would soon be writing for Al Kikuras at the legendary Unchain the Underground and getting deep into the back end of all the great metal that was coming out of Europe. On the top of my list was my discovery of cheesy power metal. At the time I was swimming in Blind Guardian, Rhapsody, and Symphony X (not Eurometal, I know) records for the first time and really finding my footing. One day while surfing the Internet I stumbled upon a streaming radio station and heard a song called “Letter to Dana.” I was stunned. Shocked. Cheesed out. And totally in love.Within days I actually received the band’s sophomore release Silence from Al to review, but not before I went over to my local CD store and ordered Ecliptica. Upon receiving it, I turned into a total Sonata Arctica monster, singing along (loudly), and giggling every time Kakko missed a preposition (and oh, did he miss prepositions!). I took no end of joy/amusement from what I saw as the perfect driving music: the high-energy, breakneck speed; the lyrical hits-and-misses; and particularly the pop sensibility in metal packaging and the extremely fun music in a scene that I already knew took itself way too seriously.Ecliptica - RevisitedAnd Ecliptica is a record that’s hard to take too seriously even though it’s a total classic1. Iconic tracks like “FullMoon” with the epic “run away, run away, run away” in the chorus, or the lyrical prowess of “Letter to Dana” (“My eyes might have betrayed me, but I have seen your picture on the cover of a filthy magazine”). The extremely poppy “UnOpened” and expansive epic of “Destruction Preventer” also add to a feeling of a band who was making music that was fun to play and fun to listen to and about as far away from the melodramatic black and gothic metal of the day.Despite being silly or maybe a little wonky, it’s surprising to me how well Ecliptica holds up after all these years. While it certainly is the most obviously Stratovarius-influenced of the band’s material, songs like “Blank File” feel relevant in 2014 because of the NSA scandal. “UnOpened” still rocks the punch it once had, and “FullMoon” makes me giggle like an Angry Metal Schoolgirl and headbang simultaneously. “Letter to Dana” is the finest metal ballad ever written (not kidding) and still holds up 15 years later in spite of itself. And that’s all just listening to original release.Ecliptica Revisited, in my opinion, shows what a different band Sonata Arctica is today than they were in 1999. First, with only 2/5 of the original lineup remaining—Tony Kakko and human metronome drummer Tommy Portimo, for those scoring at home—the players on this record are up a notch from the original band. This isn’t to insult them, but it’s a truism: professional bands always replace original members with guys who play better. This, in combination with 15 years of songwriting and arranging experience, means that Ecliptica Revisited drops new and interesting arrangements that in retrospect are straight and, frankly, kind of stale.Sonata ArcticaIn fact, unlike Manowar‘s recent re-interpretations of their records, Sonata Arctica‘s reinterpretations of their original material introduce quite a bit more variation into the game—and improvements. Vocal tracks have been layered, re-arranged and improved, while guitar solos hop out of the mix in ways that they never did on the original. The band uses dynamics and speed in a way that makes the record far less uniform. Particularly the plodding “My Land” and “Replica” both were given facelifts that make them more entertaining listens. Another interesting point is that in comparing them, I noticed they dropped the whole record a step to accommodate a more realistic range for Mr. Kakko, who certainly made the (common) amateur mistake of topping his lungs out in the studio on the first record. Like many before him, he discovered that vocal range in the studio and vocal range on the road are two very, very different things—and Revisited gives him the chance to update this mistake, while downtuning makes the record just a little darker.Still, one wonders how it came to be that Sonata Arctica decided to revisit a record that members largely have distanced themselves from in recent years. Even while they tried to plant an old school flag with Pariah’s Child, they have frequently made comments of being bored with this material since around Unia. But instead of watching the date come and go, they walked into a studio, re-learned the songs and gave them at least one take. While I’m certainly grateful for this—it sure has re-sparked my love of Ecliptica—it does strike me as out of character. Another curiosity is that after all this time, the band did not bother to correct any of the grammatical errors. Really guys? Missing prepositions aren’t any more holy than a song’s uniform time or key signature…Regardless of motive, though, I actually suggest that fans of Sonata Arctica give this a listen and give a thumbs up to the band for doing this. If you have loved this band as long as I have, there’s a definite comfort of slipping back into the old material—but it’s also nice to hear the band play it in ways that speak to great maturity as musicians. It doesn’t make the old one outdated—shit, it’s a DR6 vs. Ecliptica 1999’s DR7 rating—and it doesn’t reek of the lightning-in-a-bottle-excitement that debut records from up-and-coming bands often have, but unless Tony’s vocal performance annoys you, you’ll have trouble arguing with how good Ecliptica Revisited (still) sounds. And the changes actually make it a—surprise—great or even better (or at least different and very enjoyable) listen." - Angry Metal Guy blog
    $15.00
  • "There is a sad reality about many lesser know thrash metal acts, which could be labeled as the two album rule. With rare exception (and usually the exception is only one album being released), these bands either crashed and burned after putting out 2 superior LP releases, or otherwise broke up after hitting musical pay dirt for the 2nd time. Evildead, formed in the aftermath of Juan Garcia's 2 album stint with Agent Steel, takes after the latter category, though their impact on the thrash metal scene was minimal when compared with the actual quality of their output. It's not an entirely unexpected eventuality when one's competition consists of similarly technical outfits like Forbidden and the lesser know Defiance, newly formed pinnacles of aggression in Demolition Hammer and Exhorder, not to mention the continual onslaught of the Bay Area via Exodus and Testament. In many respects, Evildead embodied most of the positive aspects of all these projects during their brief time in the spotlight, but things were definitely changing by 1991.For all the similar imagery of greed and corporate abuse that adorns "The Underworld" when compared to the content of its predecessor, this is a fairly different album than "Annihilation Of Civilization". It starts off in a similar fashion with another sample from the "Evil Dead" films, though this time mixed in with a lot of guitar and synthesizer noise, and it does travel to almost the exact same places lyrically, but it comes off as much more conventional, at least insofar as the genre's direction was concerned in the early 90s. There's nothing on this album that comes close to rivaling the unfettered speed and fury of "The Awakening" or "Unauthorized Exploitation", nor are the technical and progressive quirks that occasionally popped up in the debut nearly as prevalent. This isn't to say that the album is a bland affair in over-repetition or an outright nod to "...And Justice For All", but it definitely listens closer to the upper mid-tempo character of the latter days of the style, having a bit more in common with "Impact Is Imminent" and "Victims Of Deception".There is a greater concentration on punch and heaviness on here, not all that dissimilar to the super-Metallica crunch character of Demolition Hammer's debut. It's not quite as fast as said album, but when hearing the pounding chug of the riff work on "Welcome To Kuwait" and "The Hood", it's pretty easy to heard that the rhythm guitars have been given a good bit more stomp to them, probably in part due to input from vocalist Phil Flores' brother Dan coming in to take over for Albert Gonzales. The familiar harmonized leads and wild soloing are still present, but tempered and a bit more methodical, almost as if Juan Garcia is limiting himself to 2 or 3 wenches rather than trying to nail the whole harem. The name of the game here is definitely mid-tempo grooving mixed with fast but not quite frenetic thrashing, and the aggressive ode to douche bag music journalists "Critic/Cynic" and the more elaborate riff machine with extremely awkward politically preachy lyrics of an opener "Global Warming" exhibit a multifaceted yet soldier-like mode of precision that is engaging, but falls just shy of extravagance.But for this album's initial consistency as it shifts gears between anti-war and environmental politics to odes of gangland violence with a precursor to Beavis and Butthead named Roscoe ("The Hood"), it actually tapers off a bit towards the end. They do manage to nail the "He's A Woman, She's A Man" cover, with Phil showcasing his ability to hit screech territory with about the same level of competence as Chuck Billy back during the mid 80s, but after that things aren't quite as memorable. "Process Elimination" listens like a thrash/speed hybrid that pays homage to early 80s Judas Priest while retaining the super-heavy guitar tone, but it doesn't quite hit as hard as the 7 songs before it and tends to come and go too quickly. "Labyrinth Of The Mind" finds itself stumbling into Pantera styled grooving and, while far from terrible, sticks out like a sore thumb whenever it drops the tempo, and likewise is a bit jarring when it picks things up. Things then proceed to close out on a somewhat convoluted note on "Reap What You Sow", seemingly taking some cues from the Metallica/Megadeth approach to semi-ballad based thrashing, but takes its time getting going and then sort of wanders around a series of impressive riffs before closing off.It's a sad thing that when the bottom fell out of the thrash scene in 1993, Evildead was one of the many casualties of the stranglehold that the RIAA still had over the entire musical world. It's a bit of a consolation that they managed to sneak in 2 LPs and a solid live album before eventually losing label support, thus opting to change their name to Terror and reverting back to Sci-Fi/Conspiratorial lyrical subjects in line with Garcia's Agent Steel days while still trying to maintain this band's style. Apparently when the thrash revival really started to heat up in the latter half of the first decade of the 2000s, this band gave it another go but apparently couldn't quite capitalized on the renewed interest in both classic Bay Area thrash and the crossover sound that Evildead dabbled in. But despite their not being a comeback LP to mark the occasion, this album and the one that came before it are highly recommended to any present partakes of the genre, particularly those liking it technical and heavy." - Metal Archives
    $14.00