Guerison

SKU: SZ37
Label:
Soleil Zeuhl
Category:
Zeuhl
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Setna is a superb French ensemble whose style of progressive rock firmly falls within the zeuhl framework.  Their 2007 debut was a bit controversial.  There was quite a bit of anticipation for the release as fans of the genre were anticipating a full on Magma assault.  What they got was something that smoldered and didn't explode but it did so consistently.  So for some fans their expectations fell short.  For more wide eared listeners they recognized a band that was influenced by Magma but didn't slavishly imitate them.

Guerison is the follow up and finds them stretching out a little bit more.  Magma is still the prime influence but there are equal influences from the Canterbury sphere.  The band employs a dual keyboardist configuration.  Florent Gac's overdriven organ will definitely remind you of David Sinclair.  There are some Mellotron bits scattered about and among the many guest musicians you will find Magma alumnus Benoit Widemann on Mini-Moog.

Outstanding stuff.  Highly recommended.

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  • "As the eerily enticing extended intro to 'Diarabi', the opening track from Goat's 2012 debut World Music, twists and turns into the slightly less eerie but equally enticing main body of the track, it has already become glaringly apparent that this is a very impressive live band at work. Over the twelve tracks on Live Ballroom Ritual you are assaulted by a live show that is complex, bizarre and more often than not, brilliant. Goat are like few other bands around at the moment, or at least few other bands that have gained any sort of wide-ish spread recognition. They are at the forefront of experimental music and for good reason.Following the excellent 'Diarabi', 'Golden Dawn' is like something from another age. They fuse together tribal drums, reminiscent of early Santana, vocals reminiscent of African tribal music, funk guitars and a healthy dose of 70s psychedelic rock. It really is the sum of its parts, each component amalgamated together effortlessly.The band's playing is loose but on point throughout. Although coming across as totally free-form, there's a definite sense of purpose in every note they play. Despite more or less every song here being stretched far beyond its recorded length, very rarely does this feel tiresome. Whereas those who were around in the 70s may think that self-indulgence has been done and many others just shudder at the thought of it, it's rarely even an option these days. In musical climate where everything tends to veer towards a formula and where too many live acts just recreate their songs as they are on record, distracting us with glossy production values, the sense of adventure and old-school musicianship displayed by Goat is a more than welcome change in direction. This is original, invigorating music, played in an often overlooked manner. It's indulgent, but it's not self-gratifying. The listener is the one being indulged.Trying to categorise Goat's music would be a hopeless exercise. Where one second they're unleashing the crazed psych-disco of 'Disco Fever', the next they're laying down the slow, infectious groove of 'Let It Bleed'. The groove is led by guitar work which is largely reminiscent of Tinariwen's Saharan-blues. Though influences are notable throughout, they are moulded and worked to fit within the band's own singular vision of fusion music. By the end of 'Let It Bleed', jazz trumpets have taken the lead and the song is off heading down a different road. Even if you've heard their studio work, their live set is still ridden with surprise turns.It's a rare occurrence that a live album truly seizes your attention and presents itself as a piece of work to be judged on an equal footing as a studio record. Live Ballroom Ritual however, is one of those occurrences. Obviously, to see them live, with their masks, energy and grand sense of theatre would be even more impressive, but as long as you can remove that from your mind, you're not likely to hear many better live albums. Generally, live albums serve as a reminder of a tour you attended or as an addition to your collection of a favourite band's recordings. Obviously there are exceptions and great live albums do exist, but it remains hugely impressive for a live album to be this enjoyable. Especially when you don't know the band's work inside out. That is the true testament to a band's live credentials.'Run To Your Mama' best embodies how good a live album this is. The huge guitar chord that beckons the song in really grabs you by the particulars and whisks you along with its primal energy. Where too many live albums try, and fail, to recreate the atmosphere of being at the gig with overly loud crowd noise and every bit of chat from the band, Live Ballroom Ritual makes the music the sole focus. As a result of this, you feel more like you're actually there than any crowd atmosphere will ever manage.For the sake of finding some kind of downside to the album, 'Goatlord' is a bit dull and 'Disco Fever' should perhaps be a bit shorter. Other than that though, they've pretty much nailed it. Of course, by the very nature of the music, Goat will be far from everybody's cup of tea but it's a cup that everyone should try at least once.The pinnacle of the album is 'Det Som Aldrig Förändras - Kristallen Den Fina'. It's an eleven minute amalgamation of everything that Goat do; and it just so happens that they do almost all of it really rather well. Its introduction and monumental riff could almost be on a Kyuss record and from here it meanders fearlessly into every corner of psychedelic rock. Put simply, it's fucking brilliant. That's also the best way to describe Goat and the best way to describe this album. Listen to it now." - The 405
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  • "There’s a certain irony to a band naming its debut album A Long Time Listening and then waiting five years to release its follow-up – but whether by accident or design, this is exactly what Agent Fresco have done. In the interim, however, with only occasional ventures outside of their native Iceland, the quartet have managed to build something of a cult following with music that is both electrifying and emotional in equal measure. Amongst their fanbase, anticipation levels for second album Destrier are several orders of magnitude beyond stratospheric. So how can they possibly be met?So let’s put everyone who may have clicked on this review with a sense of trepidation at ease as soon as possible, because not only have Agent Fresco met those expectations, they have surpassed them with almost astonishing ease. Destrier is, bluntly, a fucking masterpiece. Whether you read what follows this paragraph or not, you need to hear Destrier as soon as you can. You have been told.For those of you that are still with us, let’s delve a bit deeper into exactly what makes Destrier (pronounced DE-streer, linguistics fans) so very special. Like its predecessor, the contextual nucleus of the album is an extensive exploration of the complex web of emotions surrounding a pivotal event in the life of singer Arnor Dan Arnarson. Whereas the theme of A Long Time Listening was the grief following the death of his father, Destrier deals with the aftermath of a particularly violent attack that left some significant physical and mental injuries. As one might expect, Destrier is a considerably more burly – at times even angry – affair.A significant proportion of what makes Agent Fresco’s music so special is how cohesively the band operate together. Throughout Destrier, they pulse, flex, twitch and turn together like the sinews of a single, well-honed muscle. There is layer upon layer of complexity in the sound they create, yet it coalesces into something so immediately accessible that it reaches out to hug the listener like a long-lost friend even during that first, glorious, play through the record.What’s more, whilst each individual track stands firmly on its own two feet, they are given an extra lease of life in the context of the album as a whole. This is particularly apparent with lead single “Dark Water“, whose eruption out of the ominous, brooding, Massive Attack-esque tones of opening track “Let Them See Us” pushes it into a practically euphoric release. The album ebbs and flows as a single, continuous work of art that makes pushing the stop button tremendously difficult, so it’s best to make sure you have a free hour for that first listen. What’s more, as my colleague and our resident Icelander Jon Þor pointed out to me, final track “Mono No Aware” fades down to the same delicate note that opens the album after reprising the title track. This effectively means that the album loops almost seamlessly, which is a magical thing.The titular Destrier itself is a type of medieval war horse, whose use was reserved for battle alone. It is metaphorically deployed here by Arnor as a kind of spirit animal, giving him the fortitude to confront the anger and vulnerability he felt in the aftermath of the attack. This shows neatly the cryptic yet vivid imagery that Arnor is capable of conjuring through his lyrics, placing him in the same league as Maynard James Keenan, perhaps coupled with Muse‘s Matt Bellamy in both his sense of theatre and his achingly beautiful falsetto. However, without access to a full lyric sheet as I write, I’ll refrain from any hamfisted analysis of half-heard lines; I think it deserves more than that.Destrier also shows that whilst their music is almost immediately identifiable as Agent Fresco, they are not bound by any restrictions of genre, making the album as much of a musical voyage of adventure and exploration as a lyrical one. Perhaps the most surprising moment lies in the title track itself, which suddenly drops into dense, practically atonal shards of syncopated noise. Elsewhere, elements of greasy garage rock, slinky lounge music and soft, bubbling electronica can be found alongside more familiar choruses (which are often big enough to be visible from space), delicate piano-led sections and ebullient math-rock riffing.With more dynamic surprises like the vulnerability of “Bemoan” dropping into the brash savagery of “Angst” to be discovered, Destrier is a near-perfect artistic expression that stimulates mind, body and spirit in equal measure. Listeners may well find themselves immediately besotted, then even more deeply gratified through repeated listens.As you can probably tell, Destrier is a most uncommon delight. It will almost certainly prove to be one of the most essential listens of 2015, and maybe an even longer timescale than that. We can only hope that it won’t take another five years for Agent Fresco to release their next album, but even if that does happen, we will probably not have tired of this one by then. Destrier is a masterpiece; a glorious, life-affirming masterpiece that, once heard, will make you wonder how you managed without it. Go seek." - The Monolith
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  • Remastered edition finally taken from the original master tapes and transferred utilizing 24 bit / 96 khz technology.
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  • "While other musicians mostly vary their repertoire with nuances, every Klaus Schulze performance is hard to predict. His former bandmate Edgar Froese (Tangerine Dream) once needed a nice image when describing his way of improvising on stage with electronic instruments, "This is like a parachute jump where one cannot be sure if the parachute will even open." This was particularly true during the time of the unpredictable, analog synthesizers- but Klaus kept this same work method throughout the years without making any changes. And with this he is one of the few musicians who saved this art of improvising, all during the transition from the analog to the digital era. This is also true according to Schulze's principle, "It is important that I do not have a clue when I should be going onstage." What appears to be a paradox or what smells like absolute randomness is quite the opposite; it is a reference to all factors of this deciding moment along with a full release as well as an arrival. The definite highest point however would be the Amsterdam concert. It may also be that it was the tour's third concert after Warsaw and Berlin and all those involved had perfectly played one after another. But this does not explain the magic and the breathtaking dramaturgy of the entire performance. The non-verbal and deeply emotional interaction between Klaus Schulze and Lisa Gerrard was seldom so homogenous, real union as it was here! - Vol. 2 of the series of 3 volumes "Big in Europe" - Electronic-pioneer Klaus Schulze meets Dead Can Dance-Singer Lisa Gerrard - Complex DigiPac contains 2 CDs and 2 DVDs, as well as a booklet with extended linernotes - "žA Moogumentary II", an exciting and fascinating documentary by french director James L.Frachon on DVD 2."
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  • Legit live 2CD radio broadcast recorded in at Sendesaal, Bremen, Germany on 2/6/74 by Radio Bremen.  Magma-philes have been clamoring for an official release for years and MIG Music made it so.It features one of the great touring lineups:Christian Vander - drums & vocalsJannick Top - bassMichel Graillier - keyboardsGerard Bikialo - keyboardsClaude Olmos - guitarKlaus Blasquiz - vocals/percussion"Recorded by Radio Bremen, this double-CD document of a high sonic quality contains a slightly shorter than usual version of MEKANÏK DESTRUKTÏẀ KOMMANDÖH, and represents with the remaining tracks SOWILOI, DRUM SOLO and THEUSZ HAMTAAHK an indispensable supplement to MAGMA's other live albums."
    $18.00
  • One of the great Italian symphonic prog albums of the 70s. Recommended to fans of Banco and PFM. New mini-lp sleeve edition from Vinyl Magic.
    $18.00
  • Second studio album from what may be the ultimate chops band.  Guthrie Govan (guitars), Bryan Beller (bass), and Marco Minnemann (drums) turn it up an notch further.  Everything is set to 11 on this one. Lots of notes flying around and different styles as well - on "Louisville Stomp: I'm hearing some cool country style pickin' from Guthrie Govan that is welcome and unexpected.  He sounds like the second coming of Danny Gatton.  Other tracks are a non-stop shredfest - that's what the Aristocrats are all about.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Darker is the long awaited second album from Swiss progressive rock band Dawn. It has been 6 years since the quartet rocked the prog world with their expert take on old school symphonic rock.Dawn formed in Montreux, Switzerland in 1996.  Since then the band has performed at the famed Montreux Jazz Festival, as well as at Swiss prog rock festivals Progsol, and Montreux Prog Nights.  The band has also opened for Kansas and Fish.  After a series of line up changes the band began to focus on their sophomore release in 2010 and perform them in concert.Dawn’s music is riddled with vintage keyboard sounds and flowing guitar solos.  Plaintive vocals ascribe a kinship to the British Canterbury prog family tree.  The album is conceived as a series of compositions dealing with Man in the 21st century: his fears, his conception of life, his reaction to technology, nuclear power, and the planet’s suffocation.  Darker was recorded in 2013 by Olivier Charmillot and mastered by noted audiophile engineer Bob Katz.
    $14.00
  • "Features guest appearance by Gentle Giant guitarist Gary Green on “Words and Miracles” (Electric Guitar, Guitar solos and backing vocals) and “Crush of Night” (Guitar solo) IZZ’s new studio album, Crush of Night serves as Part 2 of a 3-part series of thematic albums that began with The Darkened Room (TDR) in 2009.Crush of Night is a worthy successor to the well-received TDR and continues the exploration of one’s journey of self-knowledge, doubt and ultimately the search for meaning. IZZ brings their characteristic sense of melody to the fore on this album while at the same time fusing high reaching emotion with the driving impact that IZZ fans have come to identify with the band. From the opening vocal melody of You’ve Got a Time to the guitar-driven Words and Miracles featuring the distinctive guitar sound of Gary Green, to the stirring emotion of Half the Way culminating with the impressive 26 minute suite that shares ist name with the album title, Crush of Night delivers on all fronts by creating a sound and passion that belong to IZZ alone."
    $12.00
  • Italian progressive band similar to Goblin. Great spooky stuff. Japanese K2 24 bit Mini-lp sleeve edition.
    $15.00
  • New end of days Christian themed project put together by Neal Morse's drummer Collin Leijenaar. He's put together an interesting lineup. Spock's Beard/Enchant's Ted Leonard handles the vocals (he's amazing as always), Mike LePond of Symphony X is on bass, as well as German guitarist Daniel Fries. There is no keyboardist so Leijenaar enlisted a bunch - Alex Argento, Jordan Rudess, Neal Morse, and Derek Sherinian. Transatalantic producer Rich Mouser mixed the whole thing. As you would expect the whole shebang is all about the apocalypse and its wrapped up in this epic sounding amalgam of progressive rock and metal. Lots of shredding solos on guitar and keys. These guys need to take it on the road before they run out of time!!
    $15.00
  • New edition of the classic second album from this amazing German band. Fully authoerized and remastered by the band it arrives with one previously unreleased live bonus track from 1973. 2nd featured a revised lineup with Stefan Diez replacing Jorge Schwenke on guitar. The ethnic vibe from Malesch is gone. Instead of inner space the band reaches for the cosmos. There is a strong Pink Floyd feel at work but it doesn't sound English (if that makes any sense). Sometimes if we don't listen to an album for some time we forget how great they are - we take it for granted. Revisiting the first two reissues from Agitation Free once again made me respect their importance in the history of German progressive rock. Essential.
    $19.00
  • Special edition CD/DVD set arrives in a digipak. The bonus DVD contains Steven Wilson's mixes: DTS 5.1, Dolby AC3 5.1 and 24/48 Stereo LPCM tracks (no idea why it's not 24/96). You also get a lot of documentary footage as well.This should probably suck but it actually doesn't. Because of a rift between Ian Anderson and Martin Barre this is being put into the market as "Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson". As you by now surmise this is a musical sequel to the original album. Again its a concept album updating us on the life of the main character Gerald Bostock. In live performance, Anderson's voice is shot. Within the context of the studio recording he plays it smart and never takes his voice where it doesn't want to go. Lots of Hammond organ and flute gives it the authentic 70s Tull flavor. Admittedly my expectations were pretty low but I have to say that this is far better than it has any right to be.
    $24.00