Freefall ($5 SPECIAL)

SKU: 314558392-2
Label:
Capricorn Records
Category:
Fusion
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"The debut recording from the Dixie Dregs (The Great Spectacular is considered a demo) stands as one fusion's high-water marks. This music is wholly original and played with a freshness and vigor that had begun to wane in a genre that was becoming a model in self-parody. The influences here are plentiful, but it is the country roots that provide the music with its vitality. Founder/guitarist Steve Morse proved to be an important new guitarist, offering an inimitable style with the technique the music demands. The music is complex and challenging, but that's easy to overlook due to the band's sunny approach. While they would go on to create more fully realized recordings, this one proved that fusion had a soul." - Allmusic Guide

Product Review

Red Circle 1
Wed, 2016-02-10 21:30
Rate: 
0
Technically Great Spectacular was the first recording but Free fall was the first major label release and it has a lot to offer. The start of an era.
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

Red Circle 1
Wed, 2016-02-10 21:30
Rate: 
0
Technically Great Spectacular was the first recording but Free fall was the first major label release and it has a lot to offer. The start of an era.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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