A Farewell To Kings ($5 Special)

SKU: 314534628
Label:
Mercury
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Everyone has their favorite Rush album...this one is mine. "A Farewell To Kings" is a pure masterpiece of progressive hard rock. Their use of dynamic shadings on this record are outstanding, most notably on "Xanadu". Essential prog.  Remastered edition.

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  • Produced by Stephen van Haestregt (Within Temptation, Ambeon). Additional production & mix by Oscar Holleman (Ayreon, Krezip, Within Temptation) at Studio RS29, Waalwijk, The Netherlands.What can you possibly do when you released the most sensational Metal debut of the year 2000? Actually it’s quite simple. You have a repeat performance of swaggering grooves on the next album as well.Decipher doesn’t politely draw your attention – it simply grabs you by the throat. Even more so than on Prison Of Desire the classical orchestra and choir and the more than impressive sound of the band itself have been forged together at superhuman temperatures. As a result the “Heavenly” elements appear to have embraced the scorching hellfire amalgamating into a fascinating alloy.For almost sixty minutes the flawless soprano of singer Floor Jansen reverberates the blaze of the ferocious nether world, which forms the breeding ground of the unconventional songs on the album. A world that abundantly proves that After Forever has grown. In every aspect.After Forever sounds as After Forever!DeLuxe 2CD Set in Digipack, Original Album & Artwork, Extensive Booklet,31 Remastered Tracks = 11 tracks Original Album + 20 Bonus Tracks,over 150 minutes of Gothic Metal!Non-Album Tracks, Unreleased Versions, Sessions & Demo’s.featuring: Mark Jansen: EPICA, Sander Gommans: HDK & Trillium and Arjen AYREON Lucassen.The original Dechiper album sold over 120.000 copies.Liner notes by Sander GommansTrack listingTMD-069 AFTER FOREVER – Decipher: The Album - The SessionsChapter 1 -  Decipher: The Album1. Ex Cathedra 2:02 -Ouverture-2. Monolith of Doubt 3:313. My Pledge of Allegiance #1 6:25 -The Sealed Fate-4. Emphasis 4:18 5. Intrinsic 6:446. Zenith 4:217. Estranged 6:55 - A Timeless Spell-8. Imperfect Tenses 4:08 - duet9. My Pledge of Allegiance #2 5:07 -The Tempted Fate-10. The Key 4:4711. Forlorn Hope 6:21Bonus Tracks12. For The Time Being 5:0413. Who wants to Live Forever 4:48 – feat Ayreon14. Imperfect Tenses 4:10 – duet with Damian Wilson15. Monolith of Doubt 3:32 – Single Version16. Imperfect Tenses 4:06 – Orchestral VersionChapter 2 – Decipher: The Sessions1. The Key 4:422. Monolith of Doubt 3:313. My Pledge of Allegiance #2 5:024. Emphasis 4:175. Estranged 6:536. My Pledge of Allegiance #1 6:207. Imperfect Tenses 4:05 (vocals Floor only)8. For the Time Being 5:029. Forlorn Hope 6:2010. Zenith 4:1811. Intrinsic 6:5612. Who wants to Live Forever 4:48 (Ayreon only)13. Monolith of Doubt 3:43 – Demo14. Emphasis 4:30 - Demo15. For The Time Being 5:09 – DemoREMASTERED IN THE 24-BIT DOMAIN FROM THE ORIGINAL MASTERS
    $20.00
  • Second album from this French zeuhl influenced ensemble.  It demonstrates a variety of influences from zeuhl, Canterbury, and RIO - all blended together with jazz rock.  The music can become hypnotic at times - quite intense actually.
    $18.00
  • "HELSTAR was formed in Texas, way back in 1982, and were one of the first power metal bands hailing from the US. Stylistically, their new (and ninth) album 'This Wicked Nest' is in the same vein as the band's classic albums from the 80's, with the same high quality as albums from their 'classic' era."
    $15.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of a remastered edition of the 1979 album by the Canadian Progressive Rock group FM, Surveillance . The band began life in 1976 with CAMERON HAWKINS (Synthesisers, Bass, Vocals) and NASH THE SLASH (Jeff Plewman) (Electric Violin, Mandolin, Vocals) coming together as a duo, making an appearance on national TV in Canada in the Summer of 1976. By March 1977 FM became a trio with the addition of MARTIN DELLAR on Drums. The band s debut album followed. By the end of the year Nash the Slash had been replaced by BEN MINK on Electric Violin and Mandolin. Surveillance was the third album by the band, released in 1979, and was a hit of the Progressive Rock genre in the USA and Canada. This Esoteric Recordings release is the first time Surveillance has been issued in Europe and has been newly remastered and includes an illustrated booklet and a new essay."
    $17.00
  • New progressive rock supergroup consisting of Roine Stolt (Flower Kings), Neal Morse (Spock's Beard), Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater), and Pete Trewavas (Marillion). Sounding somewhat like the missing link between the first and second Spock's Beard albums, SMPT:E locks in on epic track theme opening with the 31 minute(!) "All Of The Above". The standout is a cover version of Procul Harum's "In Held (Twas) In I. A blind purchase for any fan of the above bands.
    $10.00
  • Next to last album finds the band with a new lineup and a more commercial direction. Still some good stuff here.
    $18.00
  • First time on CD (does any one know why?). This was the last album the band recorded for A&M. On the heels of Ghosts it came across as a bit of disappointment at the time although I think time treated it well. John Hawken had left the band and he was replaced by a series of keyboard session players including Rick Wakeman and Tommy Eyre. One of the players, John Mealing, became a member of the band. Tracks like "Golden Salamander" and "The Promised Land" are as good as anything the ever recorded and "Hanging In The Gallery" can still bring a grown man to tears. This long awaited release comes with 2 unreleased bonus tracks and the typical nice liner notes and attention from Mark Powell and crew. Highly recommended.
    $9.00
  • "Danish rockers Volbeat have always been extremely popular in their home country, and with each album they’ve gained more momentum and fans. However, 2010‘s ‘Beyond Hell/Above Heaven’ was their true breakthrough in North America, spawning hit singles such as ‘Heaven nor Hell’ and ‘A Warrior’s Call,’ which both topped the Billboard Active Rock chart.For Volbeat’s follow-up disc, Rob Caggiano was brought aboard to produce ‘Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies.’ The collaboration went so well that Caggiano ended up joining Volbeat as their permanent lead guitarist shortly after exiting Anthrax.Anticipation has been high for ‘Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies,’ and Volbeat deliver. Their sound has always drawn on many different influences, from classic rock to punk to metal to rockabilly. Those influences and more are evident on this album, perhaps their most diverse to-date.After the acoustic western-tinged intro “Let’s Shake Some Dust,” the album kicks off with the ultra-catchy ‘Pearl Hart.’ The rock charts are packed with sound-alike bands that are good, but lack a unique identity. That’s not a problem with Volbeat. In addition to their diverse influences, singer Michael Poulsen’s voice is very distinctive.Volbeat have the ability to morph from accessible rock to heavy but melodic metal like ‘Dead But Rising’ without missing a beat. They may not be ‘metal enough’ for some fans that like their music more extreme, but they bring aboard a guest singer who is undeniably metal. The legendary King Diamond lends his world-class pipes to ‘Room 24.’The song has heavy riffs, creepy female backing vocals and plenty of vocal acrobatics from King Diamond. Poulsen’s melodic singing contrasts nicely with Diamond’s falsetto. King isn’t the only guest on the album. Sarah Blackwood from the Canadian band Walk off the Earth duets with Poulsen on ‘Lonesome Rider,’ which has some steel guitar and a rockabilly vibe.There’s a cover song on the album as well. Volbeat does ‘My Body,’ originally recorded by Young the Giant on their 2010 self-titled album. The track did well on both the Alternative and Rock charts, and many will recognize it.‘Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies’ has something for fans of numerous genres. It includes a Western theme with a little twang, lots of radio-friendly cuts, harder edged tracks, the aforementioned guest vocalists and a lot of variety. It’s an impressive effort that’s both credible and commercial." - Loudwire
    $12.00
  • One of the great overlooked albums released on Bellaphon's progressive Bacilus label.  Heavy organ/Mellotron clawing for space with blistering guitar leads.  Not too surprising some of this sounds a bit like labelmates Nektar.Limited gatefold vinyl edition of 500 copies."Strongly interconnected with fellow Marburg band Pell Mell, though the musical connection is not always so obvious, Frame exhibited a style that had very little in common with them really, being much more influenced by the late-60's heavy psychedelia and blues rock by the likes of Deep Purple or Vanilla Fudge. Only some of the rhythmic structures hinted at the Pell Mell connection. Mixing in folky styles and progressive touches into their heavy rock style, their sole album FRAME OF MIND bore the unmistakable stamp of Dieter Dierks at the mixing desk, with great use of dynamics and stereo dimension. Really varied, steering away from the mainstream of early-70's rock, with many classic moves and excellent vocals, all giving it that something special, it's an album that's still amazingly fresh even today. Andy Kirnberger was a featured guest on early Pell Mell albums, after Frame's demise he went on to the vastly inferior Hardcake Special, whilst Cherry Hochdörfer and Wolfgang Klaus moved to Pell Mell.Andy Kirnberger (guitars, vocals, piano), Cherry Hochdörfer (organ, piano, Mellotron, spinet), Peter Lotz (bass, vocals, percussion), Dieter Becker (vocals, percussion), Wolfgang Claus (drums, percussion)" - Crack In The Cosmic Egg
    $24.00
  • New remastered edition featuring 2 new acoustic tracks from Jon Oliva.
    $15.00
  • "When the studio of ever-groundbreaking Krautrock pioneers Can was sold to Germany's Rock n' Pop Museum, the entire space was disassembled and moved, and in the process, reels and reels of poorly marked and seemingly forgotten tapes were found buried amid other detritus in the studio. These tapes held over 30 hours of unreleased music from Can spanning a nine-year period and including work from both vocalists Malcolm Mooney and Damo Suzuki. Edited down to just over three hours, The Lost Tapes still includes an extensive amount of unheard studio, live, and soundtrack work from the band, and at its heights is as revelatory and brilliant as the best material on their well-loved albums. Early vocalist Malcolm Mooney left the band under doctor's orders after suffering a nervous breakdown connected with heavy paranoia, and his unhinged vocals characterize collections of early Can recordings like Delay. On The Lost Tapes, Mooney rants his way through the ten-plus-minute "Waiting for the Streetcar," a charged jam that crackles with all the same kind of energy that would embody the post-punk movement years later. Of the Mooney era, "Deadly Doris" also has the same fuzzy punk vibes meeting the kind of Krautrock groove Can excelled at, while the spoken eeriness of "When Darkness Comes" finds a brittle soundscape of formless tones and menacing muttering. Highlights are bountiful throughout the set's three discs, with soundtrack work like the hypnotic "Dead Pigeon Suite" and brilliant live renditions of classic tracks from the Damo Suzuki era like "Spoon" and "Mushroom." Some of the material cuts in and out between studio and live recordings, while other studio tracks are extended pieces with well-known album tracks housed in the middle of before-unheard jams. With over 30 hours of material to cull from, it goes without saying that Can loved to jam. If The Lost Tapes has any shortcomings, it would be that Can's exploratory nature led them to follow any idea at great length, and several of the songs approach or exceed the nine-minute mark, making the set difficult to digest at once. Some of the live tracks lack the fire of the rest of the set, as do some of the seemingly innocuous interludes. While The Lost Tapes isn't for every casual listener, the collection keeps from becoming a "fans only" compilation through the sheer amount of ideas and material put forth. Can's inarguable importance in so many fields of music from experimental to production-minded electronic music and so on has spanned generations, and these lost recordings represent an amazing mother lode to any Can enthusiast and certainly should hold more than enough interesting moments for even a curious new listener." - allmusic.com
    $24.00
  • Blow out price. Italian band sounds a bit like early Tull due to the interplay between guitar and flute.
    $14.00
  • "Another album---another vocalist. I feel badly for bands that just cannot seem to retain a lead vocalist. Italy's Soul Secret started out with a guest singer, progressed to Fabio Manda's amazing voice on their sophomore album, and now have turned to Lino Di Pietrantonio to lead them. This choice, much like the album, is a solid one, though flawed in some ways.Soul Secret's third album is called "4", and, yes, that is confusing as hell. It represents a slight change in sound for Soul Secret, due not only to the change of singer, but also to the maturity of these guys as musicians. Indeed, I hear stylistic changes across the board. Soul Secret, if you are not familiar, are definitely a progressive metal band in the vein of Dream Theater, though I'm sure that's a shadow they don't want. Either way, though, it is the truth, as they rely on strong guitars from Antonio Vittozzi, sizzling keys from Luca Di Gennaro, foundational bass from Claudio Casaburi, and the ever present structure of Antonio Mocerino's drums.Their styles have changed somewhat, though. I am a huge fan of their previous album "Closer to Daylight", and the band as a whole has moved on from shorter, more structured tracks to longer and more varied concepts. This is both good and bad, as you won't really find much to sing along to here, but you will certainly find incredible instrumentals to admire (something Soul Secret has always done well). In fact, it seems like each and every track has a noteworthy instrumental, and some, like "Traces on the Seaside", "On the Ledge", and "Our Horizon", have multiple sections that are incredibly sublime. This is partially due to the new sounds for this band, especially Luca's wonderful keys. He has moved on from the standard atmospherics so often found in prog metal to new heights of solos, even leading the music many times. Needless to say, I'm very impressed with the large range of key tones used, too. Besides this, I sense a change for Mocerino's drums, too, as he has opted for a more delicate touch than his blast beating past. In addition, Vittozzi's guitars seem much more deliberate and inspired in composition.Thus far, we have a great third album called "4" that features some notable changes in sound. This is where my slight issues with the album appear. First of all, I do feel that it is a bit long. At 72+ minutes long, I feel like some of the incredible effectiveness of the first half of the album wears off by the end. Indeed, I feel like they realize it, too, as most of the really amazing rhythms are found in the first half. This is not to say that the latter half is bad. It's actually great, especially songs like the instrumental "Silence" or the addictive ending to "My Lighthouse". Heck, "Downfall" might be my favorite song on the album! The first few tracks, however, just gel so well that you barely notice the time pass.My other issue with this album is the Dream Theater sound. This is primarily because of Lino's vocal performance. Indeed, I think the band actively tries to avoid the DT sound by including plenty of small oddities, like harsh vox, crazy synth, and a notable lack of overpowering guitar. Lino's voice, however, sounds SO much like Labrie's vox on "Images & Words". This isn't a bad thing, as I don't think Labrie has ever sounded better. Lino does avoid the pretentious wailing (thank God), but there are definitely a few times where I could have imagined that I was listening to DT.Overall, though, this is another solid album from Soul Secret, and they really show their instrumental chops. Indeed, the ending epic "The White Stairs" opens with a fantastic groove that always makes me stop everything else I'm doing. For progressive metal fans, then, I don't think there has been a better offering so far this year. Be sure to get your hands on this album!" - ProgArchives
    $14.00
  • Tenth studio album from the reconstituted verison of Focus led by Thijs van Leer.  Returning is original drummer Pierre van der Linden.  Bobby Jacobs handles bass and Menno Gootjes lead guitar.  X doesn't break any new ground.  This sounds just like classic Focus - van Leer concentrates on flute and Hammond organ and vocals.  Pure prog with strong jazzy overtones in places.  Neat cover art and logo courtesy of Roger Dean.  Highly recommended.
    $9.00