Epicloud

SKU: 0603-2
Label:
Inside Out Music
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This is the most enjoyable Devin Townsend album I've heard in years.  Townsend definitely walks to the beat of a different drummer and is constantly confounding his listeners.  Epicloud is no different.  The album is actually catchy in a poppy way but still plenty of metal elements.  The production is purely epic in nature - reverb gone wild!  Townsend mainly sings with a clean voice but even when he dirties it up its swimming in 'verb so his voice takes on an otherworldly quality.  He's complemented by the great Anneke van Giersbergen who appears through out - mainly as a backing vocalist but at times singing lead lines.  So what we have here is something I really didn't expect - a hook filled metal album that neatly collides with dream pop.

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    $15.00
  • This one is a shocker. After making one great album 38 years ago, Raccomandata Ricevuta Ritorno has reformed to record again. Led by Luciano Regoli and accompanied by many of the original members, RRR has created a new progressive work that doesn't rehash the 70s but has the spirit of "rock progressivo italiano". The band is aided by former Goblin keyboardist Claudio Simonetti and Osanna frontman/flautist Lino Vairetti. The music has quite a bit of maturity and in spots some surprising heaviness. Female and male vocals share the spotlight with some gorgeous violin bits as well. They kept it "prog" and didn't record something commercial. Kudos to them! Now can they pull it off live?
    $17.00
  • After many years of unauthorized bootlegs and promises for a legit release its finally here.  A Night On Bald Mountain is considered by many to be one of the finest examples of progressive rock from a US band.  You can debate all you want as to what is the best - let's all agree that A Night On Bald Mountain is in the upper echelon of prog.  The New Jersey based band released this classically influenced album in 1975.  Produced by ex-King Crimson keyboardist Ian McDonald, the album had a very European feel.  Elements of all the English giants can be found here - ELP, King Crimson, and Genesis.  Lots of keyboard pyrotechnics and more than enough wicked guitar and flute to satisfy everyone's taste.This long awaited reissue features mastering by Larry "Synergy" Fast and incldues two previously unreleased bonus tracks - a cover of King Crimson's "Pictures Of A City" as well as "Robot Salesman".  Housed in a nicely embossed digipak cover.  BUY OR DIE!
    $14.00
  • Part 12 of the required series of rare tracks of the German electronics pioneer!!DISC 1: "Picasso..."  is Klaus' longest composition so far. Originally it were various 1992-'93 recordings for a film soundtrack, but the film producer could not pay for it and accordingly Klaus withdrew his collaboration and his music. For the Silver Edition release I put the music in logical order. It continues on the Disc 2.The denomination of "Picasso geht spazieren" was "Picture Music in Three Movements" due to the fact that twenty years earlier Klaus invented the term "Picture Music" for one of his earliest albums. This description and name did still fit in 1993 ...especially with the variety of sampling pictures you'll hear while dear old "Picasso Takes a Walk".DISC 2: In 1995, '96, '97, '98, '99 and also in the year 2000 the more than two and a half hours long (!) "Picasso geht spazieren" was elected by the members of "The KS Circle" among the top ten of the most popular of the many KS titles, the highest position was number 3 in 1997.Words from the booklet of the original release: In terms of time, the history of Electronic Music is essentially limited to the twentieth century -in terms of a successful work inside this genre just to a handful. In terms of struggle for the new and unknown to a few, if not to just one. Though Klaus Schulze may not have the trained piano playing craft that other players outside his genre have, he gives, I think, far more poignancy, tenderness, and feeling, yes I dare to say: Soul. The truth of an artist is as simple as that: He puts his soul into his work. DISC 3: The original tape of "The Music Box" had the working title "Meditation I" first. Klaus recorded it in 1993 and gave it for free to the "Guttemplers", an institution that helps alcoholics. For the first release in Silver Edition I had given it the full title "The Music Box -Tongemälde in fis-moll" (Sound picture in F sharp minor). PS: Of course I had the famous movie in mind when I invented the title "The Music Box", yes I speak of Laurel and Hardy's only Oscar winning epos (the one with the piano up (and down) the many many steps). I did put some other Laurel and Hardy titles and references in Silver Edition. Not just KS believes that the two (and also W.C. Fields) were true geniuses, they put their souls into their work.
    $21.00
  • "The Pineapple Thief began their journey in 1999, and had a rocky road ahead of them on their way to the top. However, their music has developed leaps and bounds since their first release and this new one is no different. ‘All The Wars’ is an album that deals with the conflicts we face in life and in the world, and it does so fantastically.This record could definitely be described as a sombre album. Don’t let this put you off, instead prepare for the emotional whirlwind of a lifetime as the lyrics suck you in to the story of the album, allowing you to explore with the band the deep sense of conflict with the world that this album presents. The rising and falling elements of the songs toy with you, demanding that you feel the same emotions that the vocalist himself portrays. Songs such as ‘Last Man Standing’ for example, allow you a glimpse into the deep-routed anger of the protagonist of the song. The slow, drawn out build-up of the guitar and drums explode into a deafening outburst of emotion, which is then, almost as quick as it came, suddenly cut off and we return to slower paces. This band knows how to make you feel, and they know how to manipulate your emotions with their instruments, making you rise and fall just as easily as their crescendos. Accompanying such explosive songs are some slower paced ones, such as ‘Reaching Out’. This track is much softer, as the instruments combine together to create a melodic, easy-listening feel.‘All The Wars’ is an album that comes highly recommended to any lovers of rock, and it will definitely still be on your playlist in ten years’ time. The Pineapple Thief’s rise to fame hasn’t been an easy one, but with the release of their latest offering it will be cemented." - Sound Sphere Mag
    $9.00
  • This is the second album in the live series documenting the band's residency in Tokyo in April 2014.  This is a complete performance of Per Un Amico.  More in the series to come...
    $19.00
  • Italian sideproject of Runaway Totem is even closer to the Magma sound.
    $16.00
  • "Esoteric Antenna are pleased to announce the release of the eagerly awaited new studio collaborative album by PETER HAMMILL & GARY LUCAS. Peter Hammill’s work, both as a solo artist and as part of Van Der Graaf Generator, is legendary, whilst Gary Lucas has worked closely with many great artists and vocalists, including Don Van Vliet (Captain Beefheart) and Jeff Buckley.Described by Peter as "something quite strange, but strangely powerful”, all the music on "Other World” has been created using nothing more than guitars and Hammill’s unique vocals. Songs and other worldly instrumental tracks create a sonic atmosphere that is unique and spellbinding.A stunning work, "Other World” is certain to be one of the most unique and atmospheric albums of 2014."
    $17.00
  • "All albums are important and significant in the life of a band, no matter what the circumstances, but it’s fair to say that some can be regarded as genuine milestones, even game-changers, in that they’ll influence the whole future of the band. In view of what The Reasoning have gone through over the last two years, I think it’s fair to say that ‘Adventures In Neverland’ is going to be one of the most important in the band’s career. For a start, the personnel upheavals since the band’s last album, Adverse Camber, have seen the band slimmed down to a five-piece, and with a new guitarist, Keith Hawkins, to replace Owain Roberts. It’s also the band’s first full length release since signing a deal with the Esoteric Antenna label, so even without the personal issues, there is an awful lot riding on this album for the band.So, back-story aside, what about the music? Opener ‘Hyperdrive’ is something of a statement of intent, as if the band are ready for a full-powered launch into the future. They sound like a band with something to prove, but this really couldn’t be any other band than The Reasoning with Rachel Cohen’s soaring, passionate vocals over backing that has so much going on, it’s really hard to take everything in on one listen. ‘Urgent’ and ‘fast and furious’ haven’t often been phrases used to describe the band, but this really sets out to almost forcibly grab the listener’s attention.Some of the songs on the album have been played live for a while now, such as ‘The Omega Point’. Inspired by the novels of Scarlet Thomas, it references the band’s past work a little more than the opener, but even so it still sounds as if there’s a lot of pent-up energy in the band and there’s some fine soloing by Keith Hawkins and Tony Turrell on keys. Other highlights on the first few listens include ‘Stop The Clock’, with its extended intro almost making you assume the song is an instrumental, until Rachel comes in with the vocal, and there are some previously unheard folky influences that make ‘End of Days’ a particular treat. I should also mention ‘No Friend Of Mine’, a song about the perils of Facebook and Social Networking as a whole. It’s another song that has already been road tested live for several months and as soon as I heard it I thought it to be one of the best things the band has ever done, and I see no reason now to change that particular opinion.Inevitably, there are some who will pore over the album and the lyrics in particular for any references to Owain Roberts, and I suspect ‘Threnody’ (Dictionary definition: ‘a poem, speech or song of lamentation, especially for the dead’) will get particular attention in this respect. I don’t intend to discuss that any further here, suffice to say it’s another very fine song, and it has to be said that throughout this album new boy Keith Hawkins sounds a real find, with some excellent work, including some very nice neo-classical links on ‘Stop The Clock’. Having said that, all the playing and indeed singing, on this record is absolutely out of the top draw. There are some albums you can make your mind up about fairly quickly, but each time I listen to Adventures In Neverland I hear something new to enjoy.The recent Classic Rock Presents Prog Awards, where the band were nominated in the New Blood category, not only brought the legends of the genre into the mainstream spotlight, but also highlighted the absolute wealth of new talent that the scene in the UK can boast. By anybody’s standards, this is a very strong release from a band who more than one commentator has said are ready to break through to the next level, and this could well be the album to take them there." - The Midland Rocks
    $17.00
  • "When the studio of ever-groundbreaking Krautrock pioneers Can was sold to Germany's Rock n' Pop Museum, the entire space was disassembled and moved, and in the process, reels and reels of poorly marked and seemingly forgotten tapes were found buried amid other detritus in the studio. These tapes held over 30 hours of unreleased music from Can spanning a nine-year period and including work from both vocalists Malcolm Mooney and Damo Suzuki. Edited down to just over three hours, The Lost Tapes still includes an extensive amount of unheard studio, live, and soundtrack work from the band, and at its heights is as revelatory and brilliant as the best material on their well-loved albums. Early vocalist Malcolm Mooney left the band under doctor's orders after suffering a nervous breakdown connected with heavy paranoia, and his unhinged vocals characterize collections of early Can recordings like Delay. On The Lost Tapes, Mooney rants his way through the ten-plus-minute "Waiting for the Streetcar," a charged jam that crackles with all the same kind of energy that would embody the post-punk movement years later. Of the Mooney era, "Deadly Doris" also has the same fuzzy punk vibes meeting the kind of Krautrock groove Can excelled at, while the spoken eeriness of "When Darkness Comes" finds a brittle soundscape of formless tones and menacing muttering. Highlights are bountiful throughout the set's three discs, with soundtrack work like the hypnotic "Dead Pigeon Suite" and brilliant live renditions of classic tracks from the Damo Suzuki era like "Spoon" and "Mushroom." Some of the material cuts in and out between studio and live recordings, while other studio tracks are extended pieces with well-known album tracks housed in the middle of before-unheard jams. With over 30 hours of material to cull from, it goes without saying that Can loved to jam. If The Lost Tapes has any shortcomings, it would be that Can's exploratory nature led them to follow any idea at great length, and several of the songs approach or exceed the nine-minute mark, making the set difficult to digest at once. Some of the live tracks lack the fire of the rest of the set, as do some of the seemingly innocuous interludes. While The Lost Tapes isn't for every casual listener, the collection keeps from becoming a "fans only" compilation through the sheer amount of ideas and material put forth. Can's inarguable importance in so many fields of music from experimental to production-minded electronic music and so on has spanned generations, and these lost recordings represent an amazing mother lode to any Can enthusiast and certainly should hold more than enough interesting moments for even a curious new listener." - allmusic.com
    $24.00
  • Third album (yeah third - I don't know why it's called IV) from this excellent Finnish prog band. Where the first album had more of a space rock sound, IV finds the band moving more towards straight ahead prog rock. They are back to being an all instrumental band and I think they are better for it. Tracks like "Imaginary Blizzard" take on a symphonic rock feel and quite vividly conjure up that Finnish prog sound - a bit cold and bleak as the song title suggests. The band does lapse into some overt Ozric-isms (I just invented a word) which just shows off another facet of the band. The violin and cello add a classical dimension and at their most evil you are reminded of Starless & Bible Black. Definitely a band that should get invited over to a stateside festival. I wouldn't be surprised to see this make many top 10 lists at year end. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "Trans-Siberian Orchestra's second album, Christmas Attic, may not be as focused or serious as Christmas Eve, but it is just as enjoyable and maybe even more consistent, thanks to Paul O'Neill's increasingly impressive compositions and an improved musicality." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • The original version of Rïah Sahïltaahk that was recorded in 1971 is featured on the album 1001° Centigrade (vol. 2). But at the time, its composer, Christian Vander, was unhappy with the arrangement written by the group. This radically new version, adapted to suit the group’s current line-up, is more faithful to the spirit of Magma’s music and its uniquely weird and wonderful prog-rock style."
    $13.00
  • This is a real curious sounding band. AtomA is a Swedish trio consisting of three former members of a band called Slumber. If I could whip up a categorization for AtomA I would file these guys under "space metal". The lead singer is also the band's keyboardist. Synthesizers play a significant role in this band. The overall vibe is this epic but diffused soundscape - almost orchestra. Guitars are actually mixed down. Vocals are mainly clean with a little bit of death thrown in for accent. A totally weird hybrid of space rock, shoe gazer, post rock, and doom metal.
    $5.00