The Enemy Inside ($3 Special)

"This time around shows Prymary transcending their past achievements and creating a collage of stories that are independent and yet united in the themes of self-destruction and dreams unfulfilled. Musically the band shows a further refinement of songwriting and musicianship with songs that are more concise in musical statement, while still having the grand arrangements that Prymary is known for. As is becoming a Prymary trademark, the band has once again given special attention to combining music and lyrics together to convey the mood or feel of the song."

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:00
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This one was a little disappointing in that I really enjoyed their first album "A Tragedy Of Innocence." The first 5 tracks of "The Enemy Inside" really comprise the 18-minute title track and they are excellent. The album then loses steam with the next three tracks which are all medium-length affairs that just lack the musicality and focus exhibited in the first part of the disc, only to close with another excellent long-form composition. In general, this is a pretty good prog metal release that just seems to be a little step back from the heights these guys achieved on "The Tragedy of Innocence." Leyth
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:00
Rate: 
0
This one was a little disappointing in that I really enjoyed their first album "A Tragedy Of Innocence." The first 5 tracks of "The Enemy Inside" really comprise the 18-minute title track and they are excellent. The album then loses steam with the next three tracks which are all medium-length affairs that just lack the musicality and focus exhibited in the first part of the disc, only to close with another excellent long-form composition. In general, this is a pretty good prog metal release that just seems to be a little step back from the heights these guys achieved on "The Tragedy of Innocence." Leyth
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