Elegant Stealth

Elegant Stealth

BY Wishbone Ash

(Customer Reviews)
$15.00
$ 9.00
SKU: GCR 20066-2
Label:
Golden Core
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Despite a fracture between Andy Powell and Martin Turner, Wishbone Ash carries on - now in two different iterations. I guess Andy Powell retained the rights to the pure Wishbone Ash name and he's helming the ship on this release. Its just what any Ash fan would want - blues driven prog from a twin axe attack. That's the Wishbone Ash signature sound and if you are a fan you won't be disappointed.

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