Eidos

SKU: SR3075
Label:
Sensory Records
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Since the release of 2013’s In Crescendo, Kingcrow toured North America in support of Pain Of Salvation, and headlined a European tour.  Kingcrow kept busy in 2014, touring Europe with Fates Warning and at the same time crafting the material that would become Eidos.
“Eidos” is a new conceptual album about choices, consequences, dealing with regret and disillusion. Their earlier album Phlegethon dealt with childhood and In Crescendo about the end of youth.  Eidos can be considered the third part of a trilogy about the path of life. Musically it sees the band exploring new territories and pushing the extremes of its complex soundscape with a darker atmosphere and a more progressive attitude.

Describing the band today is quite a difficult task, but one could state that the influence of such artists as Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Opeth, Anathema, Radiohead , King Crimson and Massive Attack are all present in the music of Kingcrow.

With each release Kingcrow has taken a step further away from their original roots as a classic metal band and is now one of the most personal and exciting bands that Italy has to offer.

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However, they’re not the topical raging thrash intended to be only heavy and rough because Evildead’s performance and song-writing preceding process show some sophistication and grace. The music is violent but at the same time slightly melodic on some sequences, immaculately played and exact, proving the experience and skills of veteran Juan García and Albert Gonzales specially, whose lines lead and determined the tunes. Some of those rabid riffs are quite intricate, not excessively difficult but they make a difference from other band’s lack of precision and exhausting palm mute riffing. So they alternate sonic violence with tenuous technique on those, while “Living Good” and the title-track increase the complexity of structures, introducing distinct riff series, lengthier instrumental passages and much more melody, which becomes a characteristic element of this material. On other hand, it seems the band is trying to not play it that technical and remain accessible and casual, far from the ambitious patterns Juan developed on his Agent Steel years. That resolution becomes evident on “B.O.H.I.C.A.”, the most scruffy chaotic number of the pack, which sounds like uncontrolled hardcore combined with humoristic lyrics. But there’s another exception of opposite nature here: “Holy Trials” is the most progressive composition, tender with some constant acoustic guitar arrangements that make it sound sentimental at times, along with much more meticulous riffs and alternative structures. Apart from those 2, the rest offer no difference: “Parricide” includes a killer intro with both guitarists having a friendly duel of weighty riffing, then it follows the usual band patterns of energetic rhythms and diverse riffs, while “Gone Shooting” puts bigger emphasis on vocals.Those who expected some trace of previous Juan García projects’ sound here will be disappointed, because this was never intended to be a sequel of Agent Steel or Abattoir. The band preferred to make it simpler, straighter without an excessive presence of melody and instrumental complexity. The lack of pretention is clear on some of these numbers, which are focused on the basic characteristics of thrash, making them limited and predictable sometimes. Although Evildead can’t deny their natural predilection for difficulty and melody, both inevitably present during the album, providing their music of excellence and class which most of their peers lacked. Luckily, melody isn’t a tiring element here like it became on post-80’s Artillery and Whiplash, but it’s obvious this material is far from extreme. Phil Flores’ voice contributes tremendously to make this stuff so polite and slightly commercial. His lyrics are incessant and omnipresent, his choruses repetitive and his tone particularly sweet. It’s one of those singers who could’ve sung for a hard rock group instead perfectly, whose presence lacks strength and attitude but manages to fit the nature of these cuts. His words are about entertaining usual issues of pollution, toxic waste and environmental apocalypse, though also combined with mysticism and evil inherited from excessive hours in front of TV watching horror movies. The group name makes it clear and in fact, this mixture of urban thrash identity and horror stuff wasn’t that common, probably just Rigor Mortis introduced some cinema inspiration in their imagery. It’s not only about zombies and witchcraft, expressions like “girl beware of my probing anal tongue dart, I'll kiss your bush, and spread your cheeks apart” on the final composition prove lust and sarcasm are also part of their policy.It’s a very competent record, surprisingly refreshing and aggressive, admirably executed and well-produced. It could’ve got further for sure, maybe the presence of thousands of other common thrash albums around relegated it to discreet success and I’m not talking about selling CDs. In contrast with most of inoffensive subgenre work of that period, Evildead still included velocity, brutality (in small portion) and some obscure lyrics in their music, showing some nostalgia for the good old times. Sadly, like what happened with many other promising bands, this enjoyable material came in the wrong time, shortly afterwards thrash was no longer popular." - Metal Archives
    $14.00
  • A new Glass Hammer is like a universal constant.  I can always expect exemplary old school prog rock.  For an old timer like myself Glass Hammer is right in my wheelhouse.  This is their 17th studio album (amazing!) .  If you are unfamiliar with the band you should know it revolves around the core of bassist Steve Babb and keyboardist Fred Schendel.  There have been a lot of musicians through the doors of their studio over the years but somehow they always seem to find an endless supply of them.  The line up seems to be fairly stable at the moment.  Salem Hill mainman Carl Groves handles lead vocals along with Susie Bogdanowicz returning as well.  Guitars are handled by Kamran Alan Shikoh and drums by Aaron Raulston.Glass Hammer music is a reverential amalgam of Yes, ELP, Kansas and what the hell throw in a little bit of Genesis.  Steve and Fred proudly wear their influences on their sleeves.  Want wicked keyboard pyrotechnics?  Fred brings the thunder.  In fact they all do.  The Breaking Of The World arrives with epic length tracks and audiophile quality sound.  I wouldn't want it any other way.  BUY OR DIE!
    $12.00
  • "If you consider that most of the prog rock in the last 20 years has gone either the progressive metal path (Dream Theater, etc.) or the revival path (Transatlantic, etc.), North Atlantic Oscillation offers real freshness. A curious blend of electronics, ethereal melodies and Beach Boys/Simon & Garfunkel (or even Yes) vocals, but also reminiscent of Radiohead post "Ok Computer" or those lunatics called Sigur Rós. So, nothing to do with Genesis, King Crimson or ELP here, buy maybe some Pink Floyd flavour. NAO are, with Anathema, the best representatives of the so-called "post-progressive" genre (both of them under the umbrella of the K-Scope label). After their very recommendable "Fog Electric", "The Third Day" follows this unique sound that may be catalogued as "easy-listening" in the first place, but there's really more than meets the ear, and their tunes, although being catchy, are not easy at all. There's something addictive in the music of this Scottish combo, a strange beauty in songs like "Elsewhere", "August", "Penrose" or "Wires". Like watching clouds and figuring out their vaporous forms, this is what NAO music is about." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • At this point in time the hard rock kings of Long Island were pretty much living up to their name. Their initial "black and white" trilogy didn't make a huge dent on the national scene. They recorded a live album that was "ok". They went into the studio for their fourth album and came up with their masterpiece. If we never hear "Don't Fear The Reaper" again it would be OK with us all but it shouldn't overshadow the power of this disc. It shot the band to world wide prominence and they became a headlining act. The rest...as they say...is history. Remastered edition with 4 unreleased bonus tracks.
    $8.00
  • 150 minute NTSC DVD from these German power metal icons. Featured performances include Wacken 2001 and from their Black Sun tour in 2002. There are video clips, stuff from Wacken 1999 as well as "bootleg" footage from various tours going back to 1998. The set includes a bonus CD called "Official Live Bootleg - Live In Wacken".
    $18.00
  • CD/DVD digibook.  The DVD includes a 5.1 and DTS surround mix."Prog is, at times, a strangely divided world. On one side are the true progressives, fiercely determined to push music forward into the future. On the other side stand the stuck-in-the-mud individuals whose primary objective is to cling tenaciously to the ways of the past.Cheating the Polygraph is guaranteed to ruffle the latter camp’s feathers. A collection of Porcupine Tree songs reworked using big-band instrumentation and a modern-minded approach to arrangement, calling this album quirky would be something of an understatement.Some are likely to struggle to get past the superficial level of instrumentation, timbre, and tone – but beneath it can be felt the pounding pulse of pure creativity. On Cheating the Polygraph, timeless prog-rock tunes such as The Sound of Muzak, Heartattack in a Layby, Futile, and this long-player’s title track are all given superficially jazzy makeovers that actually owe as much to the influence of Frank Zappa as they do to less batshit-crazy genius bandleaders of decades past.For me, the band-falling-down-a-spiral-staircase groove of The Pills I’m Taking is a definite highlight – but that does nothing to take away from the masterful musicianship on display throughout every last microsecond of Cheating the Polygraph‘s running time. This eight-track album took five years to make, and the labours and love that have been poured into its creation are as tangible as they could possibly be when communicated through ones, zeroes, and soundwaves. Unsurprisingly flawless, but also unexpectedly addictive and moreish." - The Musical Melting Pot
    $20.00
  • Boy...talk about an enigma wrapped around a conundrum!"Be" is the new existential epic from the brain of PoS mastermind Daniel Gildenlow. Incorporating the aid of the 9 piece "Orchestra Of Eternity" the band completely shift gears and explore a variety of musical genres - celtic, classical, soul, jazz, R&B, and of course progressive metal are all tossed about interchangeably. There are some delicate acoustic pieces that will rip your heart out as well as heavy riffing that fits right in with the typical PoS canon. Spoken parts and even sound effects figure prominently. How the whole thing fits together is the interesting part. Any fan expecting "The Perfect Element Part 2" will be disappointed - this is more along the lines of performance art. It's way too early in the game to decide if this is in fact a masterpiece or a folly - that will take at least the dozen listens this recording deserves. As I sit here typing, I have to sit back and scratch my head as I try to decipher what is going on here. I honestly can't remember when the last time I said that about an album...
    $15.00
  • "From the moment the then still teenage Protest the Hero announced themselves to the world with their phenomenal debut record Kezia in 2006, the Whitby, Ontario quintet have been considered somewhat of a divisive force in the heavy music scene. Almost universally revered for their technical proficiency, but often misunderstood by casual listeners due to it, Protest the Hero have amassed an equal amount of fans as they have detractors for the spasmodic, genre-hopping nature of their compositions. Thankfully for the band, the fan base that they have acquired is a loyal, dedicated, and above all, passionate one. As a result of this, the band was able to finance their latest release, Volition, via the popular crowd funding service Indiegogo, and after repeated listens I can tell you that those fans are about to see their investment in Protest the Hero pay off big time.Volition, the band’s fourth full-length and first since 2011’s impressive, Scurrilous, is without a shadow of a doubt Protest the Hero’s best and most consistently mind-blowing release to date and it should see the band ascend to their rightful place amongst the upper-echelon of the progressive-metal scene. Opening with the barnstorming lead single, “Clarity,” a track that encapsulates all that is good about this band (soaring melodies, frantic shredding, earth shaking breakdowns and a rhythm section tighter than your metronome), Volition sets a cracking pace, grabbing the listener’s attention from the get-go and refusing to let go until it has had its way with you. It’s as if from the moment vocalist Rody Walker (channeling his best Sebastian Bach) screams, “Without a word uttered, a comparison is drawn,” your ears have been taken hostage by an evil musical overlord and your body has no choice but to nod along in reverence. And nod along you will as “Clarity” is followed in quick succession by the equally impressive “Drumhead Trial” and oh-so-appropriately titled “Tilting Against Windmills” (seriously TRY not windmilling to the sheer face-melting shred-fest taking place in this track) in an opening trilogy of stunning quality.With the albums modus-operandi in place, Protest the Hero continue the all-out sonic assault with the incendiary “Without Prejudice,” a piece of thrash driven metal majesty that highlights the thunderous groove provided by fill-in drummer Chris Adler (of Lamb of God fame) before letting up briefly to allow space for bassist Arif Mirabdolbagh to lay down one of the most impressive bass solos in recent memory. In fact, the rhythm section is simply stellar across the whole of Volition, with Mirabdolbagh’s talents being brought to the forefront unlike ever before, and Adler’s stick work undoubtedly causing many a Protest the Hero fan to bemoan the fact he is not sticking around as a permanent member — (the band has announced Mike Ieradi as a permanent replacement for the departed Moe Carlson).From this point onward Volition takes the listener on a bit of a journey through the most impressive elements of Protest the Hero’s past-works, incorporating their familiar genre-hopping habits as they effortlessly make the leap between the progressive-metal of “Yellow Teeth” into the punk-influenced “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Underbite,” through the more sprawling “Mist” and ferocious hardcore influence of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones.” Considering the amount of sonic territory the band covers here they would be forgiven for losing or burying melody in the mix of all the technical proficiency, but it has to be said that the opposite is true, as it is arguably on these tracks that the melodic elements of Protest the Hero really shine.This is as much a testament to the work of the much-heralded guitar tandem of Luke Hoskin and Tim Millar as it is the input of Rody Walker, who it has to be said puts in his finest performance to date on Volition. Whether busting a nut in his trademark power metal howl on tracks such as “Clarity” and “Without Prejudice” or cutting loose with a guttural roar on the likes of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones,” or crooning hauntingly in the outro of “Mist,” Walker absolutely nails it and this should be the album that puts the end to any criticism people might have about his unique vocal style. The lyrics are also much improved on previous outings, moving away for the more fantastical style of the band’s earlier works and instead occupying a middle ground between self-reflective introspection and intelligent social commentary, a maturation that blends superbly with the more rounded songwriting style displayed on the album.For their part, Hoskin and Millar put on a near-peerless display on Volition. From the opening tracks they display a rare ability to juxtapose beautiful melodic passages with breakneck riffing, all the while leaving themselves enough room to dazzle listeners with their rather unique take on all-out-shredfest. The end result of this slightly more thought out approach is that the solos actually stand out more, ensuring that although they are fewer in number than on previous albums, the ones that are there are spellbinding. Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than on album closer, “Skies,” a track that incorporates all of these elements into one of the most bat-shit-crazy tracks you will ever hear.As per usual with Protest the Hero, there are several guest appearances scattered across Volition, including the now traditional vocal contributions from folk singer Jadea Kelly on “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Yellow Teeth,” a track that also features violin from Raha Javanfar and guitar from Wyatt Shun. The absolute stand out of all of these guest appearances (there are too many to mention them all) however has to be the blistering solo contributed by Ron Jarzombek of Blotted Science on “Drumhead Trial” — it is seriously bordering on otherworldly what that guy is capable of doing with a guitar, and his contribution helps to take the track to another level of awesome.While I am conscious that I have thrown out a lot of superlatives in this review, this album is not the perfect progressive-metal release, there is times where the band still manage to get caught up in their own cleverness at the expense of the quality of the songs, but these moments are few and far between and Volition benefits greatly from the slightly more controlled approach the band has taken to crafting these songs.There is a lot of skepticism around about bands using crowdfunding to pay for the recording process, but if bands back up their fans’ investment by producing the best record of their career like Protest the Hero have done with Volition, then the music industry may have found its best business model yet. Seriously go out and buy it. You won’t regret it." - Under The Gun
    $14.00
  • Incredible warehouse find.  Scored a small horde of these and I can pass them on to you at an amazing price."Gamma Ray! Undoubtedly one of the most important names in contemporary, classic Heavy Metal, and thee most respected and influential German band in the genre. Fronted by Kai Hansen, following his departure from Helloween, Gamma Ray has become one of the most prominent bands in European Heavy Metal. "To The Metal" is the 10th studio album in 21 years of worldwide success and a new diamond in their never-ending experimental creativity. The Special Edition contains a bonus DVD in HD with interview, rehearsals, live studio sessions and 3 videoclips."
    $3.00
  • " Devin Townsend, the former prolific and extremely intense front man of the energetic Strapping Young Lad, and the creative mastermind behind such albums such as Ocean Machine: Biomech, Infinity, Terria, and Ziltoid The Omniscient, now gives us the introduction to the much anticipated Devin Townsend Project in the form of Ki.Named after a Kitarō album with the same name, Ki has a vastly different sound when compared to the work Townsend is generally known for. We find ourselves listening to a side of Townsend's mind that is sombre and smooth, all set with a relaxing groove that is only broken by Townsend's usual aggressive intensity. Indeed, Ki is a very real testament to Townsend's then newly achieved sobriety.Ki begins with "A Monday…", an acoustic instrumental rife with reverb to accentuate the simple rhythms of a clean guitar that does ever so well in encompassing what Monday feels like to a great number of us. This gentle and somewhat hollowing introduction then leads into "Coast", where we hear Townsend's vocal work as followers know full and well, backed by a nearly atmospheric blend of the other instruments, bluesy and suave, albeit grand in its execution.To say that Ki continues along the same vein as above is an affront to the album as a whole. Tracks such as "Disruptr", "Gato", and "Heaven Send" reintroduce Townsend's signature growls with the hammering rhythms that he is known for, but with a low gain twist.Though different, and simply softer than most of Townsend's work, there are very few things anyone can say against Ki. The production is masterful, with musicians that were hand picked to bring out a very distinct sound. Ki, as mentioned before, is the introductory album to the Devin Townsend Project, meant to set the stage for what the world can expect from Townsend. Now that each of the albums have been released, we know full well that the sound in each differs widely, but what does not, is the creative ingenuity Devin Townsend graces us with each of his works. Ki is the first glimpse at what Townsend is capable of after swearing away drugs and alcohol, and the product does not disappoint." - Metal Storm
    $14.00
  • "I am somewhat torn doing this review as it is one of my favorite Metal cd's, which in itself is a very brash statement and also it is Rob Halford "without" one of the greatest Metal bands in the world..... Judas Priest.During those few very sad years back in the early 90's when Halford left Priest,he formed a band called "Fight" which I think surprised everyone(including your's truly) with it's raw power and brutal almost Thrash-like Metal riffs.This was definatley not some some lame Priest cover band but it was a new way for Rob to showcase that incredible voice of his.The cd opens up with what was a staple of Mtv's Headbanger's Ball back then with the song "Into the Pit" which was a fast and furious tribute to the "Mosh Pit".The music continues to grab you by the throat and choke the life out of you and never let's you come up for air.Some of my other favorites are "Nailed to the Gun", "Life in Black" the title track "War of Words" and two absolute Thrash classics, "Contortion" and "Kill it".There is also the (Dare I say hit single..."Little Crazy").Sadly, Fight put out only one other cd but it did not even come close to the power of it's predecessor and shortly after that the band called it quits. Over the next few years Halford tried a few other projects but none of them had the "Balls" of "War of words".A few years laterHalford and Priest resolved their differences and Priest was reborn,Badder than ever.I strongly recommend this cd to any "real" Metal fan,especially the younger one's which may not have known that Rob Halford was ever in another band besides Judas Priest.Without a doubt this cd "War of Words" scores a very HEAVY....10." - The Metal Pit
    $5.00
  • The band's second album for Charisma is a dark masterpiece. It features some of their best known material like "Pioneers Over C", "Killer", etc. Robert Fripp makes a prominent appearance as well. This remastered edition comes with new liner notes and photos as well as two great bonus tracks - the 15 minute "Squid 1/Squid 2/Octopus" and the original version of "The Emperor In His War Room". Essential. NEW REDUCED PRICE.
    $10.00
  • "Voivod is timeless. That doesn’t mean that the Quebec progressive thrash metal band is frozen in stasis. Rather, it’s a testament to their uncompromising insistence on ever-changing, experimental futurism, with every album existing outside of contemporary style in some alternate universe where guitar pickups are wormholes and drumbeats ripple gravity wells." - Montreal GazetteLimited edition mediabook includes 2 extra live songs, an expanded booklets and 2 stickers. 
    $12.00
  • "Alice Cooper hadn't had a hugely successful album in over a decade when, in 1989, he teamed up with Bon Jovi producer Desmond Child for Trash -- a highly slick and commercial yet edgy pop-metal effort that temporarily restored him to the charts in a big way. Fueled by the irresistible hit single "Poison," the album temporarily gave back to Cooper the type of visibility he deserved. There's nothing shocking here, and Cooper's ability to generate controversy had long since faded. But while the escapist Trash -- which was clearly aimed at the Mötley Crüe/Guns N' Roses crowd -- may not be the most challenging album of Cooper's career, and isn't in a class with School's Out or Billion Dollar Babies, it's fun and quite enjoyable. And it was great to see the long-neglected Cooper on MTV next to so many of the '80s rockers he had influenced." - Allmusic
    $5.00