Diario Di Viaggio Della Festa Mobile (BLOW OUT PRICE!)

Remastered edition of the long out of print one-off band. It's a short one but a classic. Festa Mobile was actually a precursor to Il Baricentro. While they never displayed that band's pyrotechic fusion leanings, they did have some subtle jazz overtones but a classical influence dominated. The music is dominated by virtuoso piano runs and fuzzed out guitar leads. Gorgeous disc.

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  • "I am somewhat torn doing this review as it is one of my favorite Metal cd's, which in itself is a very brash statement and also it is Rob Halford "without" one of the greatest Metal bands in the world..... Judas Priest.During those few very sad years back in the early 90's when Halford left Priest,he formed a band called "Fight" which I think surprised everyone(including your's truly) with it's raw power and brutal almost Thrash-like Metal riffs.This was definatley not some some lame Priest cover band but it was a new way for Rob to showcase that incredible voice of his.The cd opens up with what was a staple of Mtv's Headbanger's Ball back then with the song "Into the Pit" which was a fast and furious tribute to the "Mosh Pit".The music continues to grab you by the throat and choke the life out of you and never let's you come up for air.Some of my other favorites are "Nailed to the Gun", "Life in Black" the title track "War of Words" and two absolute Thrash classics, "Contortion" and "Kill it".There is also the (Dare I say hit single..."Little Crazy").Sadly, Fight put out only one other cd but it did not even come close to the power of it's predecessor and shortly after that the band called it quits. Over the next few years Halford tried a few other projects but none of them had the "Balls" of "War of words".A few years laterHalford and Priest resolved their differences and Priest was reborn,Badder than ever.I strongly recommend this cd to any "real" Metal fan,especially the younger one's which may not have known that Rob Halford was ever in another band besides Judas Priest.Without a doubt this cd "War of Words" scores a very HEAVY....10." - The Metal Pit
    $5.00
  • "Originally released in 2002 on Hammerheart Records, Storm Before Calm marked Primordial’s fourth full-length release. Their mix of Celtic tradition and Nordic bleakness was fairly unique, with only Cruachan really even attempting to cover similar ground (with some success too, I highly recommend seeking their records out!).This reissue (on Metal Blade Records) is of the original version of the album, so we don’t get the UK edition’s extra track, The Burning Season, but that omission aside Storm Before Calm remains the essential, vital experience that it was back in 2002. Seamlessly welding elements of Irish folk music and Celtic lore to a spine of purest black metal, Primordial’s 11-year history as a band up to this point makes its presence felt throughout – songs of this length (4.57 and up, discounting the short instrumental piece “What Sleeps Within”) require a degree of skill in their crafting to hold the listener’s interest, something that the band had in spades by then.Although “The Heretic’s Age” is a fine opener, all blastbeats and shuddering melodic riffing relaxing into almost a swing feel, it’s when that track gives way to the sweeping dissonant doom of “Fallen To Ruin” and its spoken-word breakdown that the album truly reveals its intent and scope. From here on out, from “Cast To The Pyre” and its mournful yet spite-filled lyrical bent, to the scathing, full-bore assault of “Suns First Rays” and on through the folky paean to the Irish tri-goddess of battle “Sons Of The Morrigan”, to the closing salvo of “Hosting Of The Sidhe”, this is a most individual take on pagan metal, steeped in Irish legends and musical tradition.Epic in the truest meaning of the word, Storm Before Calm was Primordial’s last release strictly in this style, with 2005’s The Gathering Wilderness showcasing a bleaker, blacker feel which would become their calling-card from then onwards. If you don’t already have this, it’s more than worth your while to grab a copy of this reissue." - Alternative Matter
    $15.00
  • "For their fourth album (the first I’ve heard), Finland’s Five Fifteen continue their tradition of long psychedelic titles. Gong fans don’t be fooled, the mention of the French cheese does not bode any resemblance. Five Fifteen are a hard rock band with progressive and psychedelic leanings, not really of the metal variety. Obvious referents might include Deep Purple and Golden Earring, but the presence of two lead vocalists, male and female, really sets the band apart from any comparison I can think of. The lyrics are all in English, sung with slight accents, and a bit on the goofy side, though not embarrassingly so. Lyricist Mika Järvinen has a strange sense of reality. Perhaps he sums it up best himself in “I Don’t Remember”: “I’m the psychedelic redneck, a progressive punk / A bebopalula with a freaky funk / .. / I’m a second generation of the electric warriors / A flowerblues child of the space cowboys.” What really strikes me are the band’s arrangements, going from a delicate acoustic section with flanged singing into a blues stomp with a killer electric riff, then a guitar solo over a tricky 11/8 rhythm. Very inventive and full of surprises. The disc ends with an strange uncredited story about a guy who meets three Martians and takes them to Las Vegas." - Expose
    $7.00
  • Domestic jewel box version includes the bonus track "I Wish I Could"."At the very least, THRESHOLD may well be the UK's answer to DREAM THEATRE; progging on since 1988, 2014 sees a follow-up to 2012's "March of Progress", titled "For the Journey". Their brand of Prog Metal (let's face it, every band does it differently) involves less of a focus on instrumental technical showy-offy-ness, and emphasizes the heaviness of individual riffs, and the soaring atmospherics and ambience."Watchtower on the Moon" is teetering on the edge between classic prog motifs, and spacey, futuristic, sci-fi permutations. Upbeat, with a (largely) followable jive, a strong, groovy riff carries the first half of the track, slightly downplayed to best put the vocals out there, and what stellar vocals they are. The blend of delivery of catchy hooks, power and diction, that programs the 'Prog' name with unadulterated listenability. Interestingly enough, as the song evolves, instrumentals are brought to the forefront, and the fabrics of time signatures are toyed with, allowing melodic interplay between guitar and keyboard to flourish. "Turned to Dust" is quite the heavy piece, if not the heaviest on the album; the riffs punch through with a percussive power belied by the flamboyant melody arrangements, and also happens to contain my favorite chorus on the album."Autumn Red" is a smooth, liquid display Prog excellence, the chisel struck by the juxtaposingly heavy riffs; the "keyboards from the 70s' used to great effect, perhaps raking up nostalgia in the PINK FLOYD fans among us. Lyric enthusiasts among us will be drawn to this track; as I perhaps didn't emphasize enough, Damian is the man for the job, delivering poetry into a new artform; pure, melodic diction that embosses the expansive tapestry set by the band. "Siren Sky" is easily my favorite piece; perhaps one of the more "metal" track on the album. The first instance of riffage surged forth tall waves of pure 'epic'. Never a dull moment on this track, the riffs prepared on the piece are emotive like no other on the album; I'm legitimately without words.Easily in my top 3 of this year's Progressive releases, it is no wonder that veterans of the genre are behind this mastery." - Metal Temple
    $11.00
  • Remastered edition with 2 bonus tracks."Easily one of the most important heavy metal albums ever released, Stained Class marks the peak of Judas Priest's influence, setting the sonic template for the New Wave of British Heavy Metal more than any other single recording. This is the point where Priest put it all together, embracing their identity as the heaviest band on the planet and taking the genre to new heights of power, speed, musicality, and malevolence. Not until Painkiller would the band again be this single-minded in its focus on pure heavy metal. Their blues-rock roots have been virtually obliterated; largely gone, too, are the softer textures and gothic ballads of albums past. The lone exception is the morbid masterpiece "Beyond the Realms of Death," on which the band finally finds a way to integrate the depressive balladry of songs like "Epitaph" and "Last Rose of Summer" into their metal side. Starting out with quiet, mournful verses, the song's chorus is ripped open by a blazing guitar riff as Rob Halford shrieks about leaving the world behind, a dramatic climax that sounds like a definite blueprint for Metallica's "Fade to Black." Yet it wasn't this song that inspired the ridiculous 1989-1990 court case involving the suicide pact of two Nevada teenagers; that honor goes to the Spooky Tooth cover "Better by You, Better Than Me" (penned by none other than the "Dream Weaver" himself, Gary Wright), on which the band allegedly embedded the subliminal backwards-recorded message "Do it." Astounding implausibility aside (as the band pointed out, why encourage the suicides of fans who spend money?), it isn't hard to see why Stained Class might invite such hysterical projections. On balance, it's the darkest lyrical work of the band's career, thematically obsessed with death, violence, and conquest. That's not to say it's always approving. Sure, there are battle cries like "White Heat, Red Hot," horrific nightmares like "Saints in Hell," and elements of the fantastic in the alien monsters of "Invader" and stone classic opener "Exciter." But the band stays philosophical just as often as not. The twisting, turning title track adopts the biblical view of man as a hopeless, fallen creature preyed upon by his baser instincts; "Savage" foreshadows Iron Maiden's "Run to the Hills" in depicting violent colonizers as the real savages; and closer "Heroes End" laments the many legends born from untimely deaths. So in the end, what really cements the celebrated morbidity of Stained Class is the sinister atmosphere created by the music itself. Never before had heavy metal sounded so viciously aggressive, and never before had that been combined with such impeccable chops. Seemingly at will, Tipton and Downing spit out brilliant riffs that cut with knife-like precision, usually several per song. This means that there's a lot to take in on Stained Class, but if there's nothing here as immediate as the band's later hits, there's also a tremendous amount that reveals itself only with repeated listens. While the album's overall complexity is unrivalled in the band's catalog, the songs still pack an enormous visceral impact; the tempos have often been jacked up to punk-level speed, and unlike albums past, there's no respite from the all-out adrenaline rush. Heavy metal had always dealt in extremes -- both sonically and emotionally -- but here was a fresh, vital new way to go about it. It's impossible to overstate the impact that Stained Class had on virtually all of the heavy metal that followed it, from the NWOBHM through thrash and speed metal onward, and it remains Judas Priest's greatest achievement." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Remastered edition of the band's 1987 album comes with a few bonus tracks (some incosequential single edits truth be told) as well as fresh liner notes and photos. Not a lot of "prog" happening here.
    $8.00
  • "Steve Thorne returns with his fourth album, playing the majority of the instruments bar Nick D’Virgilio (Cirque Du Soleil/ex-Spock’s Beard) and Bob White on drums with Tony Levin and Gary Chandler (Jadis) also guesting. Also former IQ member Martin Orford pops out of musical retirement to play flute on two songs.What I like about Steve Thorne is his strong and topical lyrics, coupled with melodies that transcend the prog rock genre he is often lumped in. A bit like It Bites, Steve Thorne’s music can take in many musical influences to create an entertaining and enjoyable listen.‘Already Dead’ looks at modern culture and how modern technology can turn us into a nation of zombies. Good way to start the album with the heaviest and most aggressive song on the album. ‘Everything Under The Sun’ is a lovely piece of music, albeit rather sad as an older person looks back on their life and realises how alone they are now. The melodic vocal and subdued music add greatly to the song. ‘Distant Thunder’ is the nearest to classic Brit prog rock on the album, whilst Martin Orford’s flute expands the sound of ‘Moth To A Flame’ nicely. ‘Bullets & Babies’ again sees the heavier side of Steve Thorne’s work come to the fore tackling the subject of boy soldiers and how war affects people from an early age.An artist where you can start with any of his albums to date and not be disappointed. As mentioned previously Steve Thorne can appeal to the prog rock fans but also a wider audience who appreciate melodic rock with thought provoking lyrics." - Get Ready To Rock
    $6.00
  • Epic, bombastic, crazy over the top, power metal from Italay a la Rhapsody Of Fire."Somewhere in Italy there lies a well. In that well, there exists a special water that most Italian musicians drink from to obtain the gifts that few possess in the music world. After hearing Luca Turilli’s Rhapsody reach the sky with “Ascending to Infinity,” I thought it was nearly unattainable for any band to come close to it ever, let alone within months after its release. In fact, I thought the only band with a shot to match it would be Rhapsody of Fire....until now. Suddenly up from the fires of Hades...er, the former Olympic city of Turin, rumbles Sound Storm with its sophomore effort, “Immortalia.” Rather than presenting its form of symphonic power as “Rhapsody straight up,” Sound Storm serves it up as “Rhapsody and Wuthering Heights with a twist of jalapeño.” With its own modus operandi, Sound Storm expands the sound by adding a touch of extreme, which to me spells pure excitement.Like Parmigianino painting a beautiful landscape in the 1500's, Sound Storm paints its own masterpiece with each band member adding broad strokes to the soundscape of "Immortalia." Melody upon melody, the album is relentless in its ability to wrangle the imagination of the listener. The mesh of masterful guitar work from Valerio Sbriglione and the perfect atmosphere cast by keyboardist Alessandro Muscio, amid the thundering rapid fire drumming of Federico Brignolo and bass work of Massimiliano Flak, set up the devastating vocals of Phillippe D’Orange (a/k/a Filippo Arancio). The huge standout is the band’s use of harsh vocals a la Sbriglione, which accent D’Orange’s soaring “Fabo Lione meets Nils Patrik Johansson” range in a way that surpasses the male/female “beauty and beast” style.With Sound Storm’s unique approach, there is something for everyone within this 58 minute opus. Here the band covers an element sorely missing on many European power metal releases - a nod to the extreme. After witnessing Fabio Lione screeching near black metal on Rhapsody of Fire’s dazzling “Reign of Terror,” it hit me that symphonic power acts could add this little touch and change the very complexion of an album. It certainly doesn’t need to be overpowering or draw any attention away from the pageantry. On “Immortalia,” Sound Storm employs this tool as a secret weapon on songs like “Call Me Devil,” “The Curse of the Moon,” and “Faraway,” the latter of which is one of the finest on the album. It took some time to pick the winner when every song shines, but the rapid fire riff reminiscent of Rock N Rolf on “Wrath of the Storm” completely satisfied an undying hunger for speed.One of the things I really appreciate about this album is meticulous attention to the smallest of details. Sure, it’s easy to get caught up in the sweeping majestic symphony of the album, but there are tons of little sounds, time changes, and little inflections that come out from nowhere to grasp the listener. Few albums gave me so much enjoyment from start to finish because of this. Right then, you want examples: how about the stunning duet of D’Orange and guest vocalist Ilaria Lucille on both “Blood of Maiden” and “Call Me Devil” with Sbriglione’s evil grunts circling them both like a serpent. Or perhaps the “modern day Beethoven” composition in the middle of “The Curse of the Moon,” or the little psychotic guitar whips on the main verses of “Promises.” Add to those the beautiful piano interlude at the start of “Faraway,” and the heavily Middle Eastern influenced “Seven Veils.”“Immortalia” quite simply puts the band’s debut “Twilight Opera” to shame. The song writing and compositions are truly remarkable. There is no doubt “Immortalia” will top my list for 2012, as it has already crept into the same company as some of my all time favorite releases...just like that.Highs: Some of the most breathtaking compositions in symphonic power metal.Lows: Fans who desire less orchestration will find this gaudy.Bottom line: Sound Storm's sophomore effort is undoubtedly "Immortalia."" - Metal Underground
    $15.00
  • "The vast riches lying within the reach of Google have included a lot of bands I’ve discovered by typing long strings of words bookended by “metal” in an effort to root out underground music of varying sub-genres that I might enjoy. Forum posts often proved most fruitful, those splendid user-generated gifts of musical knowledge. One particular band I heard mentioned glowingly a few years back via a forum post was Serdce.They are a Minsk-based group and one whose 2004 album, Cyberly, was being billed as an unknown classic. I take comments like that with a pound of fucking salt. Yet it turned out to be true. So it gave me much pleasure that Blood Music worked with Islander here at NCS to premiere music from Serdce’s soon-to-be-released record, Timelessness. It was doubly nice that Heavy Blog Is Heavy began to post about them as well with yet another song premierel, because Serdce are a quirky progressive death metal band worth checking out — and worthy of that tag.I admit to feeling jarred when I first heard this album. It’s a big shift from their last record, 2009’s The Alchemy Of Harmony, a record I worship and regard as a masterpiece, although the changes make sense because they’ve been expanding toward a more prog-metal-focused sound with each release. As this was always a big part of their style, the shift away from calculating, mid-paced death metal into lighter Cynic-focused realms works phenomenally well. And it’s not as confined or as prog-by-numbers as you might think.he fusion side of this record isn’t a minor flirtation, like most of your average jazz-inflected metal dubbed progressive. In reality, it makes up the majority of the album’s sound and journey — and it’s a dense and dream-decorated journey at that. While the style on display in Timelessness is brilliant and multi-faceted to these ears, it may not be aggressive enough for the tastes of some people. For those in that camp, I urge you to examine their prior albums.That observation is not intended as an indictment or an implication that this new album is not as good as their past work — to the contrary, I would venture to say this is Serdce’s most eclectic and strongest album yet. I merely mean to say that it’s of a more airy and progressive nature and that not all metalheads may be open-minded enough to appreciate it.Serdce have been creating Meshuggah groove-gliding influenced death metal long before most of the pack who followed that lead, and they continue to do it better than most. But for those who are groove-averse, that’s far from the totality of what they have to offer. Throughout Timelessness you will hear a lot of piano playing and orchestral/carnival-esque synths, and in addition, the vocals are primarily sung this time around. Overall, the strong Cynic-vibe of the record comes not only from the riffing and fusion elements; the effusive, prominent, and exploratory bass playing brings that comparison to mind as well.Huge artistic shifts in a band’s sound remain a double-edged sword, usually causing long-time fans to quarrel for and against such transformations in equal measure. Serdce have skillfully navigated these tricky waters and come out the other side a totally different, yet no less intriguing group. Timelessness doesn’t last forever, yet it contains innumerable timelessly memorable moments within its titanic, fluid, multi-part songs. Jump on the bandwagon or crawl in the dust – Timelessness will find an interested and eager audience either way — though I urge you to give it a chance and get on board." - No Clean Singing
    $16.00
  • "With contemporary music often looking to dissolve artificial boundaries and cross-pollinate with abandon, it shouldn't comes as a surprise to hear progressive rock groups using the same tack. On one hand, expectations often drive them to stay close to home— Yes may release new music periodically, but its live shows draw more from the classic 1970-1977 repertoire than any other. Then there's King Crimson who, while looking back to some extent, are more interested in pushing forward and creating live sets reflective of that aesthetic. New groups aren't anchored down with the dilemma of evolving while, at the same time, pleasing longtime fans interested in hearing their favorite songs. Mahogany Frog suggests, perhaps, one possible future of progressive rock, bringing together elements of electronica, ambient, industrial and jazz into the more familiar terrain of detailed, long-form writing, odd meters and neoclassicism. DO5 demonstrates what might happen if Radiohead and Sigur Rós were put into a blender with Pink Floyd, Yes and Genesis, then dropping the vocals. The end result sounds like none of them, though markers run throughout DO5—Mahogany Frog's fifth album, but its first for a label with widespread distribution. "G.M.F.T.P.O." opens the nine-song, 45-minute disc with a high energy, guitar-driven anthemic melody, propelled by drummer J.P. Perron's visceral beat and Scott Ellenberger's thundering bass. But a mere thirty seconds into its brief ninety-second duration, it enters space-rock territory, with electronics entering the picture as a series of punctuating shots segue into the eleven-minute "T-Tigers & Toasters." Ambient sounds from a variety of analog and digital keyboards, played by Graham Epp and Jesse Warkentin, build into a deceptively unsophisticated three-chord change that morphs into alt-rock as they pick up guitars for a high volume, heavily distorted power-chord theme. The simplicity turns complex, however, during the second half as odd meters and unexpected twists and turns are introduced, along with sudden dynamic shifts from ear-splitting to a near-whisper. One thing is certain, however: Mahogany Frog is a band best experienced with the volume control turned up to eleven. It only helps to make the quieter passages even more dramatic and the symphonic tinges of "Last Stand at Fisher Farm," with Epps and Ellenberger picking up trumpets for its potent theme, all the stronger. Mahogany Frog isn't a group that relies on solos to impress, but Perron nevertheless stands out, his playing on the knotty "You're Meshugah!" especially frenetic and captivating. The brief, riff-driven "I Am Not Your Sugar" may be a head-banger's delight, but it's one that expects the metal-head to pump his fist while searching desperately for the "one." Accusations of bombast tend to follow progressive rockers around, and there's no shortage of turgidity to be found on DO5. Still, it's a guilty pleasure that fans of the alt-rock scene, looking for something more challenging, may well gravitate towards. For longstanding progressive rockers who believe in emphasis on progressive, Mahogany Frog hits all the right reference points, yet is as contemporary as it gets, breathing new life into what is mistakenly considered by some to be an outdated genre. They couldn't be more wrong." - All About Jazz
    $8.00
  • Tripped out album from South American guitarist Alfonso Lovo. Recorded in 1976, this only existed as an unreleased acetate.  With Santana percussionist Jose "Chepito" Areas on board, you can hear the obvious influences but there is a definite psychedelic vibe - this isn't straight up latin rock.  Synthesisers waft through the air with a lysergic randomness that reminds of some stoned out Jamaican session.  Snakey wah-wah'ed out guitar leads add to the fun and the horns and percussion treat the whole thing like some weird out take from Abraxas.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "Black Symphony was a unique concert at Rotterdam's Ahoy Arena on February 7, 2008 sold out months in advance. Within Temptation performed to 10,000 fans with the 60 piece Metropole Orchestra and a 20 voice classical choir, as well as on stage stilt performers, costume changes, and an array of stunning pyrotechnic and lighting effects." US edition of Black Symphony arrives with the main DVD and CD from the performance...but its NTSC version. If you want the longer versions with the extra discs you will have to settle for PAL editions at a much higher price.
    $24.00
  • "This album collects the trilogy of Concerto Grosso: the first known "Concert Grosso for New Trolls", first released in 1971, "Concerto Grosso No. 2", first released in 1976, and the recent "Concerto Grosso # 3", from 2013 - all composed by maestro Luis Enriquez Bacalov.The band is formed by the four historical elements of New Trolls (editor's note: who, apparently, are not allowed to actually CALL themselves New Trolls....): Gianni Belleno, Giorgio D'Adamo, Vittorio De Scalzi and Nico Di Palo.A more than 40 years since the first Concerto Grosso, this CD becomes a collector's item for all lovers of New Trolls music and a perfect gift for all lovers of Baroque music."
    $18.00