Dancing In Limbo

There are some changes to the lineup for Belgium's answer to Ozric Tentacles.  Longtime guitarist Dario Frodo only appears as a guest on one track.  He was replaced by Tom Tas.  Also appearing in guest roles are Ozric Tentacles guitarist Ed Wynne as well as a flautist anemd Charels Sla and Karel Baetens on hand percussion.  Overally don't expect any radical change in sound.  Consisting of 4 long tracks, Dancing In Limbo blasts off into space and will trip you out with celestial synths and crystalline, laser-like guitar runs.  Highly recommended.

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    $17.00
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  • "History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience. Although this was John Coltrane's debut for Atlantic, he was concurrently performing and recording with Miles Davis. Within the space of less than three weeks, Coltrane would complete his work with Davis and company on another genre-defining disc, Kind of Blue, before commencing his efforts on this one. Coltrane (tenor sax) is flanked by essentially two different trios. Recording commenced in early May of 1959 with a pair of sessions that featured Tommy Flanagan (piano) and Art Taylor (drums), as well as Paul Chambers -- who was the only band member other than Coltrane to have performed on every date. When recording resumed in December of that year, Wynton Kelly (piano) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) were instated -- replicating the lineup featured on Kind of Blue, sans Miles Davis of course. At the heart of these recordings, however, is the laser-beam focus of Coltrane's tenor solos. All seven pieces issued on the original Giant Steps are likewise Coltrane compositions. He was, in essence, beginning to rewrite the jazz canon with material that would be centered on solos -- the 180-degree antithesis of the art form up to that point. These arrangements would create a place for the solo to become infinitely more compelling. This would culminate in a frenetic performance style that noted jazz journalist Ira Gitler accurately dubbed "sheets of sound." Coltrane's polytonal torrents extricate the amicable and otherwise cordial solos that had begun decaying the very exigency of the genre -- turning it into the equivalent of easy listening. He wastes no time as the disc's title track immediately indicates a progression from which there would be no looking back. Line upon line of highly cerebral improvisation snake between the melody and solos, practically fusing the two. The resolute intensity of "Countdown" does more to modernize jazz in 141 seconds than many artists do in their entire careers. Tellingly, the contrasting and ultimately pastoral "Naima" was the last tune to be recorded, and is the only track on the original long-player to feature the Kind of Blue quartet. What is lost in tempo is more than recouped in intrinsic melodic beauty." - Allmusic Guide
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  • Third album from this Swedish ensemble that features Reine Fiske as a member.  It has a soft and gentle vibe that touches on psych, folk, and pop with undercurrents of prog creeping in (thanks to Reine).  Beautiful stuff."On Picture You, The Amazing incorporates traces of psychedelic rock, ’60s pop, and even twee, mostly in the soft-spoken, accented vocals of lead singer Christoffer Gunrup. If that all sounds like chaos, it isn’t. The Amazing has a plan, and they’re rewarded for following it to its furthest conclusion.Almost every track on the band’s third album finds itself on the far side of the five-minute mark, and that’s because no one in The Amazing is in any kind of rush. Their ability to combine all of the aforementioned disparate elements not only into one album but into one song is jaw-dropping.Even though Gunrup rejects terms like “prog” for his band’s work, that doesn’t mean they don’t apply. The seven-and-a-half-minute “Fryshusfunk” screeches over from hazy summer nap music into something much more complex and challenging in a moment of disruption that’s unparalleled throughout the rest of Picture You. The song is as easy to slip into as a dream, but once you’re inside it’s nearly impossible to extract yourself.The nine-minute title track forms the record’s gooey center, shimmering and changing shape from an airy hymn to lush, free-form instrumentation. The song’s ethereal qualities belie its muscle; about halfway in, the tone shifts to a faster pace, propelled by a swift, driving beat. It’s a song that unfolds as it goes, demanding that you spend more time with it only because it’s a hard piece of music to map after only a few listens.The languid, easy “Circles” and “Safe Island”, the former sliding into the latter, create a kind of tropical hurricane eye in the album’s first half, invoking a high-energy euphoria that could just as easily wash over listeners or whip them into a frenzy. This is big music, meant to be played over a quality sound system or, even better, live; tinny laptop speakers can’t possibly do it justice.Maybe due to the nature of its formation — the band’s lineup features members of Swedish-language bands Dungen and Granada — the band has never struggled to define its sound like other nascent bands do. It sprung forth fully formed, like Athena from Zeus’ forehead: powerful, lovely, hard to wrap your mind around sometimes, but all the more intriguing because of it." - Consequence Of Sound
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    $11.00
  • "Marbles was originally released on the band's own Racket Records label and attracted a lot of attention when it was released as the album had been funded by donations from fans who had pre-ordered the album before they started recording in return for having their name printed within the album artwork (over 18,000 names). This new 2CD Madfish edition of the album is packed in a deluxe 36 page digibook re-worked by original designer Carl Glover. The book features unseen pictures not used in the original artwork. The tracks on the second disc have previously only been available through the band's own website."
    $13.00
  • ""In Debt" is a major collectable item with the folk-rock and psychedelic rock listeners and collectors. Today, original copies of this record fetch quite interesting sums when changing hands in record fairs or internet auctions.All tracks are original compositions, and the style is very personal. It's folk-rock, but many tracks are quite psychedelic too. But don't look close for influences, they will not come to mind that easily. Bill and Alan had their own psychedelic folk-rock style.Never reissued before in any format, now here we come with a splendid reissue. Remastered sound taken from the original mastertapes. A must!! "
    $9.00
  • "This was the seventh date in a tour that had begun at the tail end of July and it's clear from the soundboard tape that the band are having a ball: the always ebullient Belew croons a couple of lines from New York New York during a riotous version of Indiscipline.Reviewer for The Record, Mark Mehler, notes that "Over the course of a two hour show that was heavily weighted with material from the band's last two LPs, King Crimson hung firmly to the cutting edge of contemporary music. Theirs was a bold, ballsy, alternately minimal and grandiose, but always intriguing set that never stopped challenging its audience." "
    $15.00
  • Debut album from this Italian power trio.  Doctor Cyclops are heavily invested in a 70s (and even 60s) hard rock sound not too dissimilar to Sir Lord Baltimore or Captain Beyond. What the hell - toss in some Black Sabbath and even Blue Cheer (yeah black and blue!).  Current bands like Firebird, Spiritual Beggars and Witchcraft are influences as well.  Blood Ceremony's Alia O'Brien guests on one track, contributing some nice spacious flute work.  On the final track "The Unquiet Garden" there is a nice bluesy Trower/Hendrix lead over some low key organ work.  Classy hard rock album.  Highly recommended.  
    $15.00