Clockwork Angels

SKU: 16861765620
Label:
Roadrunner Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"Legendary rock band Rush have unveiled details of its highly anticipated 2012 album, Clockwork Angels. The recording of Clockwork Angels began with Grammy Award winner Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Deftones) who collaborated with the band on their 2007 studio album, Snakes and Arrows - and Rush co-producing. Lyrically, Clockwork Angels chronicles a young man's quest across a lavish and colorful world of steampunk and alchemy as he attempts to follow his dreams. The story features lost cities, pirates, anarchists, exotic carnival, and a rigid Watchmaker who imposes precision on every aspect of daily life. With more than 40 million records sold worldwide and countless sold-out tours, Rush - Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson, and Neil Peart - is not only one of the most inventive and compelling groups in rock history, but remains one of the most popular."

Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-20 17:28
Rate: 
0
The power & the musicianship is all there, but I think the record is lacking truly great songs. It starts out well with "Caravan" but go downhill from there.. I wish they could be less "formula" and more progressive again on their next album perhaps? A good record, but not awesome.
Mon, 2012-08-06 17:10
Rate: 
0
Simply Stated: THE BEST RECORD THAT I HAVE EVER HEARD!!!
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

Wed, 2012-06-20 17:28
Rate: 
0
The power & the musicianship is all there, but I think the record is lacking truly great songs. It starts out well with "Caravan" but go downhill from there.. I wish they could be less "formula" and more progressive again on their next album perhaps? A good record, but not awesome.
Mon, 2012-08-06 17:10
Rate: 
0
Simply Stated: THE BEST RECORD THAT I HAVE EVER HEARD!!!
You must login or register to post reviews.
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The thick strings and swooping instrumental wrap around her versatile vocals as Tarja switches between sinister and emotional at the drop of a hat.It can be a little taboo to mention the language problems, but the purity in which Tarja approaches her English lyrics is both a positive and a negative. Whilst there are the odd cringe-worthy blips throughout ('A conquest of fear, lonesomeness and dislike'), there is a richness to the lyrics of songs like '500 Letters' that simply tell a story, without killing it with too many pretence-laden metaphors. Tarja's infamous pronunciation also serves in her favour on the record - as minor as it may seem, her slightly peculiar delivery brings an unfamiliar flavour to the songs and possesses the ability to coat any banal lyrics with seductive and intriguing overtones just with a twist of a syllable.The record does have plenty of moments to excite you, as I mentioned, but it's not an entirely smooth ride. 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Listen to that aforementioned discography and you'll see how much Tarja has grown and become a force to be reckoned with in metal. 'Colours In The Dark' is nowhere near perfect but it's another chapter in the increasingly refined career of a woman that is, quite rightly, sticking her middle finger up at those who have written her off much too soon." - The Sonic Reverie
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