Chaos A.D. (2CD)

SKU: R2562036
Label:
Roadrunner Records
Category:
Thrash Metal
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"CHAOS A.D.: EXPANDED EDITION includes a newly remastered version of the original album along with 17 bonus tracks. Among the highlights are a cover of Black Sabbath’s “Symptom Of The Universe” that was originally issued as a B-side, plus nine scorching live versions of album tracks like “Territory” and “Biotech Is Godzilla.” Also featured are several unreleased instrumental tracks that the band used during rehearsals for “Clenched Fist” and “Propaganda.”

Three years after Chaos A.D., the band returned with Roots, an album that was deeply influenced by Brazilian rhythms, which were incorporated into tracks like “Itsári” and “Ratamahatta.” Since its release in 1996, the album has sold more than two million copies worldwide."

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  • "Though Megadeth and their founder Dave Mustaine have spent their entire existence just a few steps behind Mustaine's former group Metallica, it's important to remember that they've also spent a lot of time as one of the most popular metal bands in the world. The summit of their commercial success came in 1992 with fifth album Countdown to Extinction, a creative high point from Mustaine and crew possibly spurred on in ways by the footrace with Metallica and the leaps in production made on their self-titled 1991 breakthrough album. Twenty years later, Countdown still stood as Megadeth's best-selling album, and in many circles, their most loved material. Countdown to Extinction: Live is a concert document of the 20th anniversary tour that found the band playing the album front to back, bookended by a few odds and ends from other albums. While the premise seems pretty rote, the execution of the live album is surprisingly interesting. Most live re-creations of full albums fall flat in comparison to the original artifacts, and this is no exception, but it's great to hear the devoted legions sneer along with every word of Mustaine's schizophrenic monologue on "Sweating Bullets" and cheer insanely at the now-dated George Bush samples that pop up throughout the set list. The performances are pinpoint, but the live sound lacks the production and feel of the studio album and eventually the tracks blur, losing the excitement a live experience offers. While the inclusion of extra crowd favorites like "Hangar 18" and "Peace Sells" flesh things out somewhat, the thrill of the live setting doesn't completely transfer, and all but the Megadeth superfans will probably prefer revisiting the original 1992 album before diving into the strong but much duller offerings of the live album." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • Ok so here's an album I didn't think would have a ghost of a chance of me enjoying but I was pleasantly surprised. Australia's Teramaze play a style of old school thrash metal but there are strong prog elements and its quite melodic to boot. Some killer dual guitar staccato riffing and a vocalist that doesn't get too nasal or whiny. Imagine that - a thrash metal vocalist that can sing without annoying!
    $12.00
  • "For Flotsam and Jetsam, the heavy metal highway has been sprinkled with nails. First, the band's frontman Jason Newsted quit to seek his fame and fortune with Metallica. Then, after securing a major label deal, Flotsam and Jetsam were cajoled into toning down to appeal to the masses. Eleven years after releasing its classic album Doomsday for the Deceiver, the band returned to the label that signed it, writing more aggressive material than it had in years. High is a declaration of hate, brimming with full-fisted guitar riffs and head-bobbing beats--an unrestrained battle cry from a band that refuses to lay down and die." --Jon Wiederhorn
    $4.00
  • "Is this really the end? Our story told, forever to be forgotten in the ashes of time? When we will perish, will anyone remember life stories, personal ventures gone into the vastness of space? No doubt that the question of mankind’s future existence is something that most people tend to ignore, busy with their daily troubles, probably only have nightmares about it or watching disasters in movies. On the other hand, that same question has a magnitude that will eventually consume the wanderers, possibly to cause paranoia, but it will still remain a personal truth. Within the vast corridors of Metal music, mankind’s quandary of survival has been quite a topic, always diverting patterns of thoughts regarding the matter whether with vile disgust or slightly more optimistic point of view. The Danish MERCENARY reached out for what would be considered as the darkened days, where mankind will be consumed by disease, hate and perdition. “Through Our Darkest Days”, via NoiseArt Records, carries on the bands continual modern melodic Death Metal deliveries, a hybrid with what could be perceived as contemporary Power Metal. Within the banned outskirts, a possible future is here, alive, telling its tale.Amidst the obscurest demesnes of “Through Our Darkest Days”, MERCENARY seemed to have preserved their musical principles since their earlier days. This new number shares the band’s greatest qualities once again on display. The impeccably crafted melodic Death Metal with updated driven Power Metal, a bit closer to the its modern Swedish counterpart al’a SOILWORK, Jakob Mølbjerg and Martin Buus provided assorted types of riffing whether shooting off harmonies in the vein of IRON MAIDEN, showcasing melancholic melodies or barraging partial staccato rhythms and several other palm muted chugs, a breed of a creative view, Buus delivering frantic soloing showing off his expertise with a few Bluesy like surprises on the side, Peter Mathiesen clearly a worthy addition to this band since his first days in 2009 with being a diverse drummer and of course at the bass and vocals, René Pedersen. I believed that I said it before, after reviewing the band’s previous “Metamorphosis”, but it has to be said again, ever since the departure of Mikkel Sandager, Pedersen took the reins as both clean and growl vocals. In that moment, I became even a bigger fan of the band as Pedersen drama fused clean vocals along with low to mid end growls of high quality swept me off my feet, always channeling spectacular harmonies that sound so rich and endless.Generally, “Through Our Darkest Days”, in comparison to the previous contender, “Metamorphosis”, felt somewhat defiant, aggressive, heavier, but also catchier that before much like the band’s earlier discography. Furthermore, the album’s amazing flow, and atmospheric acuities, created a sort of an understanding of the dimmed message the band is trying to create in front of you, mostly thanks to the profound grasp of the keyboards meeting perfectly with the band’s melodic fortitudes. “A New Dawn”, “Through Our Darkest Days” and “Holding On To Serenity”, assumingly the album’s prime highlights, were able to slightly shade the impact of early songs as “Firesoul” and “Shades Of Grey”. “Dreamstate Machine” and “A Moment of Clarity” delivered a chunk of fistful of heaviness, in your face Metal with distinctive sense of anger but also a look for beyond, out of the box inside looking out, harmonic vocals so emotive along with well written guitar riffs, cracking with rhythmic simplicity in times, but still shrewd as always. In last few words, it will never be the same, but MERCENARY, since emerging as a foursome crew, has been assimilating the meaning of true greatness, their attention to details is exemplary with great ideas to keep up the foundation going. " - Metal Temple
    $12.00
  • "Album number four for New York metal thrashing extraordinaire's Anthrax. Persistence of Time used to be my favorite Anthrax album, and even though I give the edge to Spreading the Disease I still rate this one highly, and I prefer it to the likes of Among the Living.Persistence of Time has the distinction of being Anthrax's most accomplished release, well, as far as musicianship and performances go. The band decided to take themselves seriously here and this album feels right at home amongst the Victims of Deception, Years of Decay, Twisted Into Form crowd. A lot of the bands slight crossover element is largely missing, with the exception of the "Got The Time" cover, which serves as highly beneficial to the release.The tracks are quite a bit longer than usual here, with the opening four numbers swimming a see of six - seven minute tracks. Anthrax really deliver over the longer time periods and the songs are given a lot more room to grow. When concerning production I feel that by todays standards Persistence of Time happens to stand up the best amongst the bands work with Joey Belladonna. The mix is fantastic, and the bass has a great prominent sound which as a result leaves this album sounding the heaviest of the Anthrax backlog."Time", "Blood" and "Keep it in the Family" are all massive in scope as far as Anthrax goes, and these songs are among some of the best the band have done. From the darker edged riffs, to the build up and dynamics this is all good. "Keep it in the Family" is a particularly awesome example of Anthrax ala Persistence of Time. Not to blow their wad in the first half of the album we have the awesome "Gridlock" which houses some of Anthrax's most menacing work, and the bad-ass "Belly of the Beast". Proabably the catchiest track on the album (not including the cover), this was actually the first Anthrax song I ever heard, and has some fond memories attached to it.Persistence of Time is a really cool release, and is reflective of its given genre at the time. Thrash was pushing forward in quite an exciting way, yet somehow it all went wrong. Even now when we have a fuck load of caricature thrash bands, none of them try to progress like Anthrax did here. Despite the niggling "Got The Time" the rest of the album is awesome and is of interest of any thrash fan, especially those with interest in the later releases around the late 80's early 90's." - Metal Archives
    $5.00
  • 24 bit gold remaster from Mobile Fidelity. This version was remixed by David Mustaine and features four bonus tracks. This is the best this album will every sound.  Out of print - incredible price!
    $15.00
  • "here have been many waves of thrash metal in the course of the past three decades. The whole scene started in the early ‘80s with the Big Four—Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, Anthrax—and the numerous American and German thrash bands that followed them. In the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, as thrash started to fade, the second wave began, with less-prominent American thrash bands and German bands attempting to keep the scene alive while the Big Four stagnated or lost relevance. In the late ‘90s, a new wave of thrash bands from Europe, led by the Haunted and Darkane, took on the mantle of thrash revivalists, helping to bring the scene back.Now, in the last five years, a whole new group of young American thrash bands have attempted to bring back the old-school thrash style of the ‘80s with their fast, technical play and raw production. Bonded by Blood is one of the bands in this fourth wave of thrash, and its debut Feed the Beast showed a lot of promise. The band’s sophomore effort, Exiled to Earth, upholds the high standard Bonded by Blood set for itself and even sees the group surpass it in some ways.Exiled to Earth is unique in that it’s a concept album, which is incredibly rare to see in thrash. The album tells the story of an alien race known as the Crong, who come to Earth intent on conquest. A group of warriors must fight back against the Crong to regain control of the planet and save the human race. Almost none of the veteran thrash bands ever attempted to create a concept album, so seeing one of the young bands do that shows a lot of maturity and inventiveness. The concept only exists in the lyrics, so it doesn’t distract from the music in any way. However, it also makes the lyrics even more interesting to read and memorize, for those who enjoy doing such things.Musically, Exiled to Earth is a throwback to the glory days of thrash in the early ‘80s with just enough young energy added to make it sound fresh. This will make the album a big hit among both diehard thrash veterans and newcomers to the genre. Guitarists Alex Lee and Juan Juarez channel the best parts of Slayer from Reign in Blood and Seasons in the Abyss, from the lightning-fast solos to the impossibly tight riffing. Vocalist Jose Barrales is a dead ringer for Bobby “Blitz” Ellsworth of Overkill, using the same high-pitched, urgent delivery of the veteran. Drummer Carlos Regalado and bassist Jerry Garcia keep the rhythm section together from start to finish, reminding listeners simultaneously of Ton Hunting from Exodus and David Ellefson of Megadeth.In short, Bonded by Blood has created a titanic record that raises the bar for all of its contemporaries. The other young thrash bands have held their own up until this point, but Bonded by Blood is now the first one to step out and make a statement. Exiled to Earth shows all doubters that this band is the real deal, capable of playing with the veterans as well as its peers. Expect to hear more great things from Bonded by Blood in the future." - Pop Matters
    $5.00
  • "Anthrax's first album with vocalist Joey Belladonna is a huge leap forward, featuring strongly rhythmic, pounding riffs and vocals that alternate between hardcore-type shouting and surprising amounts of melody. Two tracks left over from the Dan Lilker days are here as well. The traditional metal lyrical fare is more original, while also introducing a penchant for paying tribute to favorite fictional characters and pop culture artifacts ("Lone Justice" and "Medusa" are prime examples). One of Anthrax's best efforts." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "Pantera's back, and all is as wrong with the world as it ever was. They're going to make sure you know it, too. Despite the four-year absence from the studio between Great Southern Trendkill and Reinventing the Steel, Pantera's unflagging aggression is confirmed by the full-throttle rhythms, throat-ripping vocals, and crunchy guitars. Call it their Metallica legacy, except that Pantera are more Metallica than Metallica these days. Heavy metal of this breed may be past its heyday, but Pantera's not going away quietly. In fact, evidence suggests that they're not going away at all--no matter how low you keep the volume knob, Reinventing the Steel is loud, loud, loud!" --Genevieve Williams
    $9.00
  • "The proper follow-up to Among the Living was somewhat disappointing in its inconsistency. While there are some good moments -- "Be All, End All" is one of the band's most melodic moments, and several other tracks catch fire -- the best thing here is a cover of Trust's "Antisocial," and it doesn't bode well when covers outshine original material. The lyrics continue the self-consciously intellectual, PC approach begun on Among the Living, but about half of the album is surprisingly dull." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Japanese SHM-CD in a mini-lp sleeve."Kill 'Em All may have revitalized heavy metal's underground, but Ride the Lightning was even more stunning, exhibiting staggering musical growth and boldly charting new directions that would affect heavy metal for years to come. Incredibly ambitious for a one-year-later sophomore effort, Ride the Lightning finds Metallica aggressively expanding their compositional technique and range of expression. Every track tries something new, and every musical experiment succeeds mightily. The lyrics push into new territory as well -- more personal, more socially conscious, less metal posturing. But the true heart of Ride the Lightning lies in its rich musical imagination. There are extended, progressive epics; tight, concise groove-rockers; thrashers that blow anything on Kill 'Em All out of the water, both in their urgency and the barest hints of melody that have been added to the choruses. Some innovations are flourishes that add important bits of color, like the lilting, pseudo-classical intro to the furious "Fight Fire with Fire," or the harmonized leads that pop up on several tracks. Others are major reinventions of Metallica's sound, like the nine-minute, album-closing instrumental "The Call of Ktulu," or the haunting suicide lament "Fade to Black." The latter is an all-time metal classic; it begins as an acoustic-driven, minor-key ballad, then gets slashed open by electric guitars playing a wordless chorus, and ends in a wrenching guitar solo over a thrashy yet lyrical rhythm figure. Basically, in a nutshell, Metallica sounded like they could do anything. Heavy metal hadn't seen this kind of ambition since Judas Priest's late-'70s classics, and Ride the Lightning effectively rewrote the rule book for a generation of thrashers. If Kill 'Em All was the manifesto, Ride the Lightning was the revolution itself." - Allmusic
    $16.00
  • "When you play by your own rules and say what you think you're always going to cause some degree of controversy and piss a handful of people off in the process. The upside (and it's a big upside) is you keep your integrity intact and get the immense satisfaction of knowing that your creation is yours and yours alone, and the naysayers be damned. Enter guitarist, occasional vocalist, songwriter, producer, and ANNIHILATOR big cheese Jeff Waters. He wins a few, he loses a few, but he's always got a dedicated fan base and a pretty damn impressive slew of traditional/thrash metal releases to his name. He could have played it safe and gone with another unapologetically thrash metal album like 2005's outstanding effort "Schizo Deluxe", but as he's prone to do he changed things up just a hair and involved an all-star cast of guest musicians for "Metal". In this case, he's come up with another winner that still involves plenty of classic ANNIHILATOR thrash with a few wrinkles thrown into the mix that will probably irritate some folks, but will please many more.The bulk of "Metal" is straight-up thrash and traditional metal in the vein of "Schizo Deluxe". Songs such as "Clown Parade" (featuring Jeff Loomis), "Chasing the High" (w/ Willie Adler), "Downright Dominate" (w/ Alexi Laiho), "Smothered" (w/ Anders Björler), and "Kicked" (w/ Corey Beaulieu) a few of the tunes that showcase Waters' prodigious riff skills and cracking solos. If you're a fan, you'll dig these tracks. One could criticize the somewhat mechanical drumming (sound and style) of Mike Mangini, but the focal point here is the guitar and I find the skin beating to be more than adequate for what Waters is trying to get across. The axe master even takes over the microphone for another stomping beast called "Operation Annihilation" (w/ Michael Amott). "Haunted" (w/ Jesper Strömblad) is an eight-minute track notable as much for its aggression as its arrangement changeups into alluringly tuneful territory. One wonders if the rhythm/riff similar to BLACK SABBATH's "Children of The Grave" during the verse of "Detonation" (w/ Jacob Lynam) was intentional, and in either case the song is a winner. While some are not completely enamored with Dave Padden's vocals, which alternate between the clean/melodic to the gruff/aggressive, I find them distinctive and fairly well suited to the ANNIHILATOR style.Finally, two of the standout tracks (for different reasons and depending on your point of view) are "Couple Suicide" and "Army of One" (w/ Steve "Lips" Kudlow) The former features Danko Jones delivering melodic clean (one might even say emo-esque) vocals, while Angela Gossow offers some guest growls. The initial impression I got from hearing the track was one of puzzlement (as in, "huh?"), the effect wearing off a few spins later when I realized that the song is actually quite catchy. The track is guaranteed to bug the shit out of more than a few people though due to it straying so far from the signature sound of the remaining tunes. "Army of One" is just plain fun, the ode to '80s metal survivors featuring Padden name dropping the likes of METALLICA, MEGADETH, and BLACK SABBATH.Mark "Metal" down as another solid ANNIHILATOR effort. I still prefer "Schizo Deluxe" for its righteously metallic approach, but this one is nearly as enjoyable, albeit for different reasons." - Blabbermouth.net
    $5.00
  • "If Metallica and Slayer invented speed metal, Anthrax brought it to the East Coast and imbued it with the attitude and excitement of New York hardcore. Among the Living is, without a doubt, their finest hour--a roaring, adrenaline-pumped collection of flailing beats, precise, razor-edged riffs and shout-along refrains. Unlike most full-throttle metal vocalists of the era, Joey Belladonna chose to sing as well as shout, giving songs like "Among the Living," "Indians" and "Efilnikcufecin" ("nice fuckin' life" spelled backwards) a decided melodic edge. Yet Scott Ian and Dan Spitz's buzzsaw guitar flurries, and Charlie Benante's insistent drumming, prevented the songs from ever degenerating into the run-of-the-mill heavy metal they so despised. "
    $5.00
  • Japanese SHM-CD in a mini-lp sleeve."The most immediately noticeable aspect of ...And Justice for All isn't Metallica's still-growing compositional sophistication or the apocalyptic lyrical portrait of a society in decay. It's the weird, bone-dry production. The guitars buzz thinly, the drums click more than pound, and Jason Newsted's bass is nearly inaudible. It's a shame that the cold, flat sound obscures some of the sonic details, because ...And Justice for All is Metallica's most complex, ambitious work; every song is an expanded suite, with only two of the nine tracks clocking in at under six minutes. It takes a while to sink in, but given time, ...And Justice for All reveals some of Metallica's best material. It also reveals the band's determination to pull out all the compositional stops, throwing in extra sections, odd-numbered time signatures, and dense webs of guitar arpeggios and harmonized leads. At times, it seems like they're doing it simply because they can; parts of the album lack direction and probably should have been trimmed for momentum's sake. Pacing-wise, the album again loosely follows the blueprint of Ride the Lightning, though not as closely as Master of Puppets. This time around, the fourth song -- once again a ballad with a thrashy chorus and outro -- gave the band one of the unlikeliest Top 40 singles in history; "One" was an instant metal classic, based on Dalton Trumbo's antiwar novel Johnny Got His Gun and climaxing with a pulverizing machine-gun imitation. As a whole, opinions on ...And Justice for All remain somewhat divided: some think it's a slightly flawed masterpiece and the pinnacle of Metallica's progressive years; others see it as bloated and overambitious. Either interpretation can be readily supported, but the band had clearly taken this direction as far as it could. The difficulty of reproducing these songs in concert eventually convinced Metallica that it was time for an overhaul." - Allmusic
    $16.00