Buenos Aires Free Experience

SKU: RR05010
Label:
Record Runner
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Interesting release from this great Argentinian symphonic band. The band's label invited the band to come into the studio and create a spontaneous recording. Its predominantly instrumental. Lots of electricity - with frets and keys flying all around. Obviously not composed but completely coherent, when the band clicks the sparks really fly. The band's vocalist Lito Marcello appears on the last song and the band enlisted a guest violinist who sat in for the last couple of tracks. Obviously a little different from their standard recordings but I think this was a highly successful experiment.

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