Bridge Of Sighs (Remastered)

SKU: 5099950184521
Label:
Chrysalis
Category:
Blues Rock
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Where to begin? Remastered and expanded edition of one of the greatest guitar albums of all time. The former Procol Harum guitarist put all the pieces into place on this one. Just pure divine wah-wah heaven - "Day of The Eagle", "Bridge Of Sighs", "Too Rolling Stoned" - the list goes on. Not one bad track - just pure primal electric energy. This desert island disc has been made even better as it includes 8 bonus tracks recorded for two different John Peel radio sessions. Beyond essential...

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    $5.00
  • Latest studio album from this lethal German band.  SBE was formed by guitarist Christian Peters in 2007.  The quartet (twin guitar, bass, and drums) will deeply satisfy the musicial appetite of any fans of 70s psychedelia, space rock, and doom metal.  They may well be the ultimate stoner rock band.Revelation & Mystery finds the compositions a bit tighter than previous efforts but that's a relative term when the title track runs past the 12 minute mark. Vocals don't interfere too heavily with the acid laced space trippin' guitar work.  Peters sings a bit and then they get down to serious business jamming their way into the cosmos.  If you are fan of early Guru Guru, Hawkwind, and Black Sabbath, or even Deep Purple you need to hear this band.  I got high just looking at the cover art.  This album is a total lease breaker to boot.  BUY OR DIE!  "The second album from Samsara Blues Experiment in as many years, Revelation and Mystery (World in Sound) takes a surprising turn in approach from their Long-Distance Trip debut, distilling the jams of the first record into more structured, song-based material. The tracks of Revelation and Mystery almost exclusively follow verse-chorus-verse patterns, and while part of the joy of listening to a song like “Singata Mystic Queen” from the prior collection was meandering along with it, Samsara Blues Experiment don’t completely lose sight of the journey in favor of the straightforward. Right from its start, Revelation and Mystery sees the four-piece layering guitar effects and infusing their parts with swirls and a spaced-out feel. It’s not that they’ve completely changed their methodology so much as they’ve shifted the balance within their sound. These structural elements were certainly present on Long-Distance Trip, but a cut like the semi-acoustic “Thirsty Moon” shows that Samasara Blues Experiment are able to work within these parameters to grow their songwriting. One gets the sense in listening to opener “Flipside Apocalypse” (which follows a 17-second nameless intro track) that this process is just beginning and that the band are still finding out what they want their sound to be, but that only makes Revelation and Mystery a more immediate, direct experience; the linearity of the album unfolding gradually as the songs move from the straightforward into the more sublimely jammed.Fast-paced rumbling from the bass of Richard Behrens in the surprisingly punkish beginning of “Flipside Apocalypse” is an immediate clue to the changes the last year have brought about in Samsara Blues Experiment. The mood is more active, less calming and chilled out than last time around, and the guitars of Hans Eiselt and Christian Peters – who also handles vocals – seem to be more concerned with riffing out than stacking layers upon layers, though there’s some of that too, even as later in the song a riff straight out of the biker rock milieu shows up and carries the song through to its end. I don’t know if it’s the result in some change in the band’s songwriting process or just how things happened to come out this time, but the change continues through “Hangin’ on the Wire,” which is genuinely hooky and thoroughly in the realm of heavy rock. A crisp production during the solo section brings to mind some of Queens of the Stone Age’s finer moments, and drummer Thomas Vedder locks in with Behrens’ own excellent fills with a few of his own. Peters, though, emerges at the head of the song. His vocals confident and effected in equal measure, he works quickly to establish the verse and chorus patterns, both worthy of sing-alongs, so that by the end, “Hangin’ on the Wire” feels like its earned its handclaps, and though “Into the Black” starts out more ethereal, with extended solo sections and a long instrumental introduction, the shuffle soon takes hold and it proves to be more boogie than nod.But perhaps “Into the Black” is where the band begins their subtle shift into more esoteric sonics, because as the soft strums and plucks and interplay of electric and acoustic guitars take hold on “Thirsty Moon,” the song feels neither out of place nor especially unexpected, which it very well might have if placed earlier on Revelation and Mystery. Peters’ vocal line feels a little rushed during the verse – it’s almost as though there were too many syllables to fit in the line – but the interaction of his and Eiselt’s guitars in the instrumental break and the balance between the guitar and Vedder’s drumming in the mix makes up for any such hiccups. Another chorus feels delivered more appropriately, and the progression cycles through again; solo section into chorus, solo section into chorus. And it’s not until Behrens’ highlight bass line begins “Outside Insight Blues” that it’s apparent just how much Samsara Blues Experiment put into the album’s flow. Added keys allow the guitars to go farther out into sporadic notes without sacrificing fullness of sound, but after about two and a half minutes, there’s a turn into riffier material that carries the groove through the next six. There are a few part changes, but things don’t really feel jammed out until the classic ‘70s boogie meets psychedelia of the last 90 seconds or so, blues harp and all. It’s a shift worthy of Siena Root, and the two-minute interlude “Zwei Schatten im Schatten” (in English, “Two Shadows in the Shadow”) follows suit with an appropriate marriage of Eastern and Western musical traditions with sitar and acoustic six-string. There’s something sweet and solemn in the intertwining melody, and it’s a passing thing on the way to the 12-minute closer, but worth paying attention to in a way that many interludes aren’t.Then, at last, comes the ending title cut. Worthy of its name, “Revelation and Mystery” caps the album with a sense of psychedelic majesty through which Samsara Blues Experiment show their ability to keep hold of a song no matter how deep into space they might also want to push it. The song winds. Its progression is at once driving and subdued, and of all the songs on Revelation and Mystery, it’s probably the best blend of all sides of what’s shown itself to be the band’s current sound. Of course, at 12 minutes, one could easily argue it has time to do and be all these things – with room left over for a bit of that sitar to show up as well among the guitar leads – but still, it’s another display of the maturity Samsara Blues Experiment have been able to take on in a relatively short amount of time (their demo gave first notice in 2008). Some bands need three years to learn and foster growth between their albums, and some bands need to play. If the jump between their first and second records is anything to go by, Samsara Blues Experiment would seem to be the latter. Wherever this stylistic form takes them, I don’t imagine it’ll be too long before we find out, but until then, the 47 minutes of Revelation and Mystery provide a varied and exciting listen worthy of repeat visits. Samsara Blues Experiment continue to progress, continue to impress." - The Obelisk
    $12.00
  • The band's second album finds them seeking their own identity. There is still a Porcupine Tree vibe but its much less overt. Keyboards are definitely not in the forefront - this is a guitar driven effort with lots of crunch, distortion, and a schmearing of grunge. Good stuff!!
    $10.00
  • Magenta's latest finds them returning to an overtly progressive rock sound and the music is all the better for it.  The Twenty Seven Club is a concept album based around famous rock stars that died at the age of 27 (Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hedrix, Kurt Cobain, ao).  The core lineup is Rob Reed, Christina Booth, and Chris Fry.  For this album the band is rounded out by guest drummer Andy Edwards of IQ.  Reed's keyboard work is back in the fore and Fry's Howe-isms on guitar always bring a polish to the music (and grin on the face).  Christina Booth's voice is a real gift and she shines as always.  Overall the music makes some overt references to Yes and Genesis so you get that old school flavor that the band hasn't offered in many years.  The album arrives in a special edition with a bonus DVD.  You get the complete album in a 5.1 mix, documentary footage and a promo video for one of the tunes.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Trio of Alex Skolnick (Testament) on guitar, Tim Alexander (Primus) on drums, and Michael Mannring on bass. Although there is some structure to the songs they have a loose improvisational feel. Pretty uncommercial and not at all what you would have expected from a Magna Carta release.
    $9.00
  • "This time around shows Prymary transcending their past achievements and creating a collage of stories that are independent and yet united in the themes of self-destruction and dreams unfulfilled. Musically the band shows a further refinement of songwriting and musicianship with songs that are more concise in musical statement, while still having the grand arrangements that Prymary is known for. As is becoming a Prymary trademark, the band has once again given special attention to combining music and lyrics together to convey the mood or feel of the song."
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  • "Gazpacho envisaged a story of a man who cuts all ties to the world and moves to a lighthouse to write a mass for Atropos and to taste true solitude. The title is also a wordplay on misanthropy which supposedly plays a part in the concept as well. The album tells the story of what happens inside his head and includes three of his attempts to write the mass as well as the final Missa Atropos."
    $15.00
  • Lethal third album from this German heavy stoner/psych quartet.  Waiting For The Flood clocks in near 50 minutes and consists of only four tracks (!).  While mixing in Eastern motifs and instrumentation(dig the sitar), the band explores some of their heaviest terrain.  Bass lines distort, drums pound away, and then the wah wah laced soloing blasts into the deepest realm of the cosmos.  Ocassionally some keys will crop up adding a nice effect.  The music effortless morphs from doomy Sabbath metal into Guru Guru sonic explorations that will definitely rattle your cage.  Think Masters Of Reality meets Hinten. A total mind blower that scores a 6 on the vaporizer scale.  BUY OR DIE! 
    $15.00
  • Third album since the resurrection of this Swedish symphonic band led by keyboardist Hans Lundin and guitarist Roine Stolt. No major surprises here - symphonic rock perhaps a bit in the vein of Flower Kings. FK bassist Jonas Reingold is here as is Ritual vocalist Patrick Lundstrom. Female vocals are quite prominent and supplied by the single-named Aleena. Mats & Morgan monster drummer Morgan Agren holds down the fort. The 26 minute title track is clearly the standout.
    $12.00
  • Atmospheric and mysterious. Those were the key words that Arjen Anthony Lucassen had in mind when he started his ambient rock project Ambeon back in 2001. For this, the multi-instrumentalist started a co-operation with singer Astrid van der Veen, a 14 year old super talent that Lucassen had discovered shortly before, and the later Within Temptation drummer Stephen van Haestregt. Ten years after the first release, Ambeon’s only album Fate of a Dreamer is now being released as a digipack with remastered original recordings, some single-edits/remixes and an extra track. The big surprise is a bonus-cd with acoustic versions of various Ambeon songs and many Ayreon classics, which has been Lucassen's flag ship for almost two decades.DeLuxe 2CD Set in Digipack, Original Album, Extensive Booklet,27 Remastered Tracks = 10 tracks Original Album + 17 Bonus Tracks,over 115 minutes of music.Liner notes by Arjen Lucassen.Track listingTMD-070 AMBEON – Fate Of A Dreamer: The Album – The Unplugged RecordingsCHAPTER 1: THE ALBUM1. Estranged 2:512. Ashes 5:293. High 4:154. Cold Metal 6:505. Fate 7:456. Sick Ceremony 3:447. Lost Message 4:338. Surreal 4:389. Sweet Little Brother 6:0810. Dreamer 5:17Bonus Tracks11. Cold Metal 3:48 – Single Version12. Merry-Go-Round 4:4513. High 3:29 – RemixCHAPTER 2: THE UNPLUGGED RECORDINGS1. Actual Fantasy 1:252. Valley of the Queens 2:393. Ashes 3:154. Charm of the Seer 3:295. Castle Hall 4:336. Estranged 2:497. Temple of the Cat 3:328. Isis and Osiris 6:099. High 3:4310. Garden of Emotions 4:3111. Sick Ceremony 3:0212. House on Mars 5:2213. Lost Message 3:4214. Into the Black Hole / Cold Metal 5:10REMASTERED IN THE 24-BIT DOMAIN FROM THE ORIGINAL MASTERS
    $22.00
  • Ninth album from this Swedish band.  Katatonia's music shares a kindred spirit with that of Opeth and Tool.  Very much emotion driven with a dark vibe through out.  It doesn't come more melancholy than this one... "Despite being into their third decade, gloomy Swedish progressive metallers Katatonia are still producing fine work. 2009’s Night Is the New Day was heralded as the band’s finest ever album, and with prog’s increasing influence evident across the more facile end of the metal spectrum, this band is doing better than ever. Dead End Kings marks another progression for this outfit – in terms of album structure, anyway. While their previous effort was a sumptuous effort with a sum greater than its parts, this ninth album is a collection of fantastic, searching songs that stand alone as well as they do together. It’s still completely and utterly miserable, though… so very, very miserable. The cellos in opening track The Parting add solemn layers to music that is already laden with sorrow and introspection. It’s a multifarious affair from then on in. The slightly sinister Hypnone adds strength before the album succumbs to the mellow, emotive The Racing Heart. Buildings is the most resolutely metal track here. Its humungous riffs are positioned at exactly the moment where the listener may have been lulled into a false sense of security, bludgeoning guitars swelling the song’s belly with a fiercely charged beauty. There are other moments of grandiose, majestic beauty breaking up the murkiness, but Buildings is the only piece of metal you’re going to get.Dead Letters is massively reminiscent of Tool – and while the American prog-grungers remain at work on their overdue fifth LP, it’s a very welcome sound. It doesn’t last though. As with everything Katatonia do, the song wanders off into another direction, atmospheric moments splintering into sparse orchestration, Jonas Renkse’s murmured voice flying across the top throughout. <br><br>The closer is certainly the finest standalone song here, bringing Dead End Kings to a glorious and complex end. There’s no grand climax. It just fades to dust, allowing you to reflect upon yet another excellent album from Katatonia." - BBC
    $15.00
  • First solo album from the former Soft Machine member, recorded in 1969. This is the remastered edition featuring six unreleased bonus tracks including one with Syd Barrett.
    $11.00
  • Deluxe remaster with bonus tracks of Kevin Ayers' third solo album. Fantastic lineup including Mike Oldfield, David Bedford, Robert Wyatt, Didier Mahlerbe and others.
    $12.00
  • F I N A L L Y ! ! ! Fantasy becomes reality - after 15 years Cynic has returned with their second album and it does not disappoint on any level. Traced In Air is not a rehash of Focus. Instead it sounds like Cynic...15 years later. You can hear commonality with Focus but its a further evolution. Paul Masvidal downplays the death vocals (although present). The mechanical vocal processing reappears as a wink and a nod to the old days. Reinert and Malone are as titanic a rhythm section as any in metal. Jason Gobel did not return but new guitarist Tymon Kruidenier is a more than able replacement. His former band Exivious was heavily influenced by Cynic - in other words he groks it completely. Compositionally its right up there with Focus - a unique mix of technical metal with fusion underpinnings. Lots of bands are influenced by Cynic but no one sounds quite like them. Traced In Air is pure alchemy. This will top most year end best-of lists and rightfully so. An album that will be talked about for years to come. BUY OR DIE!!
    $14.00