Anthology

SKU: SBR177CD
Label:
Sacred Bones Records
Category:
Soundtrack
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Last year I saw John Carpenter perform a selection of his movie themes with his Lost Themes band.  It was a very engaging performance and a hell of a lot of fun.

This new anthology is a collection of movie themes from 1974-1998 performed by Carpenter and his band.

"John Carpenter is a legend. As the director and composer behind dozens of classic movies, Carpenter has established a reputation as one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of modern cinema, as well as one of its most influential musicians. The minimal, synthesizer-driven themes to films like Halloween, Escape From New York, and Assault on Precinct 13 are as indelible as their images, and their timelessness was evident as Carpenter performed them live in a string of internationally sold-out concert dates in 2016. Anthology: Movie Themes 1974-1998 collects 13 classic themes from Carpenter's illustrious career together on one volume for the first time. Each theme has been newly recorded with the same collaborators that Carpenter worked with on his hit Lost Themes studio albums: his son, Cody Carpenter, and godson, Daniel Davies."

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  • Not sure if this ever saw the light of day on CD - this may be the first time. This is the soundtrack to G'ole - the official film of the 1982 World Cup. Its all instrumental with Rick handling keys, Jackie McAuley (!?) and Mitch Dalton on acoustic guitars and of course Tony Fernandez on drums.
    $17.00
  • "A lot of the music pieces used in these films reappeared later in various other Rossif documentaries, like those for the artists Morandi and Georges Braque, and the similar nature-inspired documentary-series “L'Opera Sauvage”. When sometime after “L’Apocalypse Des Animaux” went out an album with the same title was assembled, it was simply a matter of putting some of the tracks recorded for the films onto the record. So the later Vangelis method of first scoring a movie and later recording (not always the same) music again for the soundtrack-album wasn’t yet practiced for “L’Apocalypse Des Animaux”. All this suggests that Vangelis wasn’t involved in the actual editing of his music into the films, but rather that he provided Rossif’s team with a library of pieces for them to use in whatever way they felt convenient, then or later. The documentaries each involve showing the animals in their natural habitats or nature reserves – here Vangelis' music is used, not very extensively, just here and there, along with a voice-over. Some episodes make a detour to showing animals in zoos and parks or the scientific study of animals in laboratory environments – here no music is used and we sometimes see and hear the attendants and scientists explaining their methods and observations. The filmmakers and narrators are never in picture, in contrast to the later documentary style of people like David Attenborough and Jacques Cousteau.Vangelis has stated that it took about one day per episode to score, which is born out by the fact that indeed each episode has fresh bits of music, and only a few cues are repeated across episodes. Except for the opening track on the album “Generique” which plays along with the opening and concluding credits to each episode, a couple more tracks are used throughout the series, with some more appearing in 3 or 4 episodes. To name a few: a joyous playful melody played on keyboards and flute that usually accompanies animals playing around, an experimental piano + percussion theme also used for the Georges Braque film, a mysterious exotic slow theme usually together with underwater pictures, a rather silly disco theme (also used in the Morandi film) which uses one of those cheap drum-presets that came along with those first-generation electric pianos. Strangely enough, none of these repeated themes appear on the album, whose six further tracks are taken in seemingly random fashion from the other music in the series, although one reason might be that they at least include the ones which have other instruments on them, like guitar or trumpet. For every piece that does appear on the album an estimated 4 or 5 are left out, with most of them just as good as the ones that did make it.From the first episode “Le Singe Bleu” is taken, where it accompanies the agile movements of a young monkey as it jumps from tree to tree and does a balancing act on a horizontal stick (it reappears briefly at the end of episode 5). Episodes 2, 3 & 4 yielded no music at all for the album. The fifth uses two album-tracks: “La Mort Du Loup”, accompanying pictures of wolves being shot at in the snow and on the savannah. And “L’Ours Musicien”, which is actually some 4 minutes, as opposed to the 1 minute put on the album. This accompanies a sweet and funny tale of researchers picking up two baby ice-bears abandoned by their mother, who decide to go rummaging through the researchers’ hut. The final and most apocalyptic episode starts with the earth-organic sounds of stand-out track “Creation Du Monde”, accompanying beautiful slow-motion pictures of large birds on their yearly treks across the sea. The revitalising nature of the sea after oil-spills and other attacks on its eco-system form the idea behind “La Mer Recommencee” and pictures of divers with dolphins and octopuses go with the music of “La Petite Fille De La Mer”. At the end of this episode and the series, as part of a sort of philosophical summing up, “Creation Du Monde” is played out to the very end, even across the end-titles, instead of the usual “Generique”.All this enchanting early Vangelis music, created very effectively using relatively simple means, is evidence of a seemingly endless pouring out of ideas, free of any outside pressure. It all has a very fresh sun-lit feel to it and only on “Earth” again would Vangelis once more approach that same kind of Mediterranean sound. Broadly speaking, the pieces he created fall into 4 categories: melodic pieces, sometimes dreamy and nostalgic, percussion-pieces, wacky funny pieces and more exotic experimental stuff (when some 10 years later Vangelis did the music for “Sauvage et Beau” the same categories applied again, with the exception of the purely percussive). The music doesn’t so much describe the realities of nature itself but rather reflects a sort of philosophical reality. On one level, the association one gets is how people in prehistoric times might have viewed nature: sometimes tranquil (as in “La Petite Fille De La Mer”), sometimes dark and mysterious (as in “Creation Du Monde”) but always as part of themselves. On another level the music manifests a sort of nostalgic longing back to those times, which can nowadays only be glimpsed in the ever-decreasing world of animals, hence the title of the series." - Vangelis Movements
    $10.00
  • Seems like reunions are about to become the rage in Italy. First Arti & Mestieri and now Goblin. This is the soundtrack to the latest Dario Argento film Nonhosonno. Featuring the original lineup the band does not stray far from the formula of their early efforts - this is dark atmospheric progressive music. The only concession would perhaps be to a modern sound of the instruments used but this is Goblin music through and through. Fans will not be disappointed. 
    $15.00
  • Remastered soundtrack to the George Romero gorefest w/alternate takes and one unreleased track.
    $21.00
  • APOLLO: The ancient Greek and Roman God of music and poetry.SONS OF APOLLO: The new supergroup featuring members of Dream Theater, Mr. Big, Guns ‘N Roses, and Journey.In early 2017, rumors began circulating about a new secret project including former Dream Theater members Mike Portnoy and Derek Sherinian. Finally, on August 1st, the duo revealed the details to the rest of the world, introducing their new band, SONS OF APOLLO.Reuniting to form SONS OF APOLLO, Portnoy and Sherinian join forces with guitarist Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal (ex-Guns N’ Roses), bassist Billy Sheehan (The Winery Dogs, Mr. Big, David Lee Roth) and vocalist Jeff Scott Soto (ex-Journey, ex-Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force). Their debut album, Psychotic Symphony, will be released October 20 on InsideOutMusic/Sony Music. Psychotic Symphony was produced by the dynamic production duo of Portnoy and Sherinian, also affectionately known as “The Del Fuvio Brothers,” the nickname given to them over 20 years ago during their time together in Dream Theater.SONS OF APOLLO formed very organically, its seeds planted with a predecessor group, as Portnoy explains: “Derek and I reunited shortly after I left Dream Theater in 2010 and we put together an all-instrumental touring band with Billy Sheehan and Tony MacAlpine. That was my first time working with Derek since the ‘90s when he was in Dream Theater, and it was just great to be working with him again. Ever since that tour, which was really just a one-off live thing, he has been nudging me to start a real, original, full-time band. The timing just had never been right, because I had too many other things on my plate. Long story short, the time was finally right to take the bait and put together a band.”“Mike and I work at a relentless pace in the studio,” continues Sherinian. “The music is modern, but we have an old-school soul. What is unique about SONS OF APOLLO is that we have true rock n’ roll swagger along with the virtuosity-- a lethal combination!”But what to call the next great supergroup? “Derek was mainly the one behind the name,” says Portnoy. “I have a list that I keep on my phone of about a hundred different band names, which I constantly have to refer to every time I have a new band every year (laughs). So I pulled up the list and Apollo was one of the names on the list. It was a word that both of us really liked. We started fiddling with different variations of the word. One of the original band names we were working with was Apollo Creed, the character from the Rocky movies, but after lots of different discussions on different variations, Derek suggested SONS OF APOLLO and it seemed to stick. Apollo is the god of music, so with that in mind it seemed like a fitting name.”With Portnoy, Sherinian and Sheehan having previously toured together in the aforementioned lineup that came to be known as PSMS, playing instrumental versions of various songs drawn from each member’s history, SONS OF APOLLO was the next logical step. They kept that fire burning and stoked it higher by bringing in a different guitarist, adding a vocalist, and creating all original material. The nine songs comprising Psychotic Symphony incorporate the progressive style and individual technical prowess Portnoy and Sherinian shared together in Dream Theater, combined with the swagger and groove of Van Halen, Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin.“I have known Mike and Derek for a long time, so when they came to me with SONS OF APOLLO, I jumped on this straight away,” says Thomas Waber, Label Manager/A&R International of InsideOutMusic. “However, the album they ended up recording exceeded my already high expectations by a long mile! We couldn’t be happier about it!”SONS OF APOLLO will hit the road in 2018 for their first worldwide tour.“This is a real band,” Portnoy declares. “This is going to pick up for me and Billy where The Winery Dogs left off, in terms of this being the next logical full-time thing for us. I’m not saying The Winery Dogs have broken up, because we haven’t, we’re just on a break. SONS OF APOLLO is absolutely going to be a full-time band and we plan on touring all over the world throughout 2018 and, honestly, it is the priority for all five of us.”Sherinian agrees, “We will go on a worldwide crusade in 2018 to bring SONS OF APOLLO to as many people as possible. Apollo was the God of Music, and we are his mighty offspring!”SONS OF APOLLO ARE:Mike Portnoy – drums and vocalsDerek Sherinian – keyboardsBilly Sheehan – bassRon “Bumblefoot” Thal – guitar and vocalsJeff Scott Soto - vocals 
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  • "When the soundtrack album 'The Score' was released in 2005, Epica proved once and for all that they were more than just another female fronted rock band. Like the original version, 'The Score 2.0' is a stunning soundtrack that stirs the imagination whilst succeeding in being an epic trip, even without any accompanying pictures. It's the nuances that make the difference on 'The Score 2.0'. The already timeless piece of music sounds refreshed, and listening truly feels like revisiting a memorable trip. 40 tracks including 20 unreleased versions for over 2 hours of music! Comes in deluxe 2CD digi-pack gatefold sleeve with rare memorabilia and 20 page booklet."
    $21.00
  • Remastered version of the soundtrack to Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation Of Christ". Fantastic sound.
    $12.00
  • Last year I saw John Carpenter perform a selection of his movie themes with his Lost Themes band.  It was a very engaging performance and a hell of a lot of fun.This new anthology is a collection of movie themes from 1974-1998 performed by Carpenter and his band."John Carpenter is a legend. As the director and composer behind dozens of classic movies, Carpenter has established a reputation as one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of modern cinema, as well as one of its most influential musicians. The minimal, synthesizer-driven themes to films like Halloween, Escape From New York, and Assault on Precinct 13 are as indelible as their images, and their timelessness was evident as Carpenter performed them live in a string of internationally sold-out concert dates in 2016. Anthology: Movie Themes 1974-1998 collects 13 classic themes from Carpenter's illustrious career together on one volume for the first time. Each theme has been newly recorded with the same collaborators that Carpenter worked with on his hit Lost Themes studio albums: his son, Cody Carpenter, and godson, Daniel Davies."
    $14.00
  • "Dire Straits leader Mark Knopfler's intricate, introspective finger-picked guitar stylings make a perfect musical complement to the wistful tone of Bill Forsyth's comedy film, Local Hero. This album was billed as a Knopfler solo album rather than an original soundtrack album, with the notation "music ... for the film." Knopfler brings along Dire Straits associates Alan Clark (keyboards) and John Illsley (bass), plus session aces like saxophonist Mike Brecker, vibes player Mike Mainieri, and drummers Steve Jordan and Terry Williams. The low-key music picks up traces of Scottish music, but most of it just sounds like Dire Straits doing instrumentals, especially the recurring theme, one of Knopfler's more memorable melodies. Gerry Rafferty (remember him from "Baker Street"?) sings the one vocal selection, "That's the Way It Always Starts."" - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • Actually credited to Simonetti, Morante, Pignatelli. This is the complete soundtrack to the 1982 giallo thriller. It features lots of unreleased cues.
    $20.00
  • Edensong is a progressive rock quintet from New York City.  The band's self-released 2008 debut "The Fruit Fallen" was hailed as a "masterpiece" by critics, and helped to pave the way for live shows and notable festival appearances throughout North America.At over 70 minutes of new music, their 2016 followup, "Years in the Garden of Years" is even more ambitious than it's predecessor, and will be sure to appeal to fans of both classic progressive rock and metal.  The concept album features an extended song cycle on themes of time, each song a different scale and perspective.  The melodies are more memorable, the riffs more powerful, the flute playing more inventive and propulsive.  The songs prominently feature immersive new textures, from lush keyboard and orchestral arrangements to esoteric percussion from around the world, such as hang drum and Balinese gamelan.   "Years in the Garden of Years" is mastered with audiophile precision by Grammy winning engineer Bob Katz, and the CD release features stunning original cover art and booklet illustrations from beloved surrealist painter Dan May. 
    $13.00
  • "A haunting soundtrack to a short movie by Mat McNerney (Hexvessel/Beastmilk) and Kimmo Helén (Hexvessel), inspired by Newfoundland Folk and the Canadian wilderness."We researched a lot into Newfoundland and traditional folk music of the past and today, spending a few months looking into and listening to libraries of collected works. I was surprised at how much it reminded me of the Celtic music of my Irish upbringing and ancestry and felt immediate connection to it and an instant ability to relate to the stories. Together with the multi-talented craftsman Kimmo Helén we set about creating a soundscape using only traditional instruments that would have been used in Newfoundland folk. We worked to try to open a portal to dream, nostalgia, a deeper yearning for our roots and the joy that comes from finding your place in the universe. We hoped to be able to help tell Justin's story in as humble and honest way we could and to find a musical voice to his character's inner emotions and journey.""
    $15.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • "Peter Gabriel's first foray into soundtracks was for Alan Parker's contemplative film Birdy and is a successful companion piece, providing a backdrop that is moody and evocative. Nearly half of the album's dozen tracks incorporate threads from material found on Gabriel's 1982 Security set, including "Close Up," which makes use of keyboard passages from "Family Snapshot," and "The Heat," which is a reworking of "The Rhythm of the Heat" and builds to a frenzied percussive crescendo. Material specially written for this project includes the murky opening track, "At Night," the tribal "Floating Dogs," and "Slow Marimbas," a track which would become part of future live performances. The fact that Birdy is comprised of all instrumentals means that listeners whose familiarity with Gabriel is limited to "Sledgehammer" and "In Your Eyes" will be largely disappointed. However, its meditative nature makes it fine, reflective listening for the more adventurous." - All Music Guide
    $12.00