Addicted

SKU: 0507-2
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Inside Out Music
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The second album of a projected 4 disc series. This one is heavier than Ki and also features Anneke Van Giersbergen (ex-The Gathering) as guest vocalist.

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Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
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My son, JT, turned me on to ths; I've shyed away since the Zoltor cd, but it [addicted] follows right along with what Devon has done. this is NOT SYL; its more like Industrial wall of sound, and the female vocals in it, spike it like a hint of opiate, with out the scars of mainlining. listen with headphones, first. A real Winner! mw
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
I'm not a Devin fan at all and I haven't liked anything Anneke has done since If_then_else, but their combination on Addicted is amazing; I still don't really like the first two songs but it kicks in hard with "Bend It Like Bender" and never looks back - this is some of the best pop metal I've ever heard and Anneke and Devin both sound fantastic, at least when he's singing with his clean vox (which he does everywhere else except those first two songs). Expect his signature heavy dense wall-of-sound production with extremely rocking and engaging though sometimes quirky arrangements that stick in your head long after you turn the disc off. I still can't get over how much I'm enjoying this disc, it's the last thing I would have expected to hit my top 10 for 2009, but there you have it.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
My son, JT, turned me on to ths; I've shyed away since the Zoltor cd, but it [addicted] follows right along with what Devon has done. this is NOT SYL; its more like Industrial wall of sound, and the female vocals in it, spike it like a hint of opiate, with out the scars of mainlining. listen with headphones, first. A real Winner! mw
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
I'm not a Devin fan at all and I haven't liked anything Anneke has done since If_then_else, but their combination on Addicted is amazing; I still don't really like the first two songs but it kicks in hard with "Bend It Like Bender" and never looks back - this is some of the best pop metal I've ever heard and Anneke and Devin both sound fantastic, at least when he's singing with his clean vox (which he does everywhere else except those first two songs). Expect his signature heavy dense wall-of-sound production with extremely rocking and engaging though sometimes quirky arrangements that stick in your head long after you turn the disc off. I still can't get over how much I'm enjoying this disc, it's the last thing I would have expected to hit my top 10 for 2009, but there you have it.
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