2112 ($5 Special)

SKU: 314534626
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Progressive Rock
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The progressive elements are in full force and many of the band's signature pieces appear here. Highly recommended.  Remastered edition.

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  • "Listening to Cardiacs, I get the mental image of a deranged gerbil in a hole somewhere composing music. Although at one point he may have been content to write jingles and fine- tuned pop ditties in exchange for sunflower seeds, Cardiacs represents everything past the point where the gerbil loses his grasp on reality and becomes wrapped up in creative fervor. Now unabated by mundane rodent things, the gerbil and his music fall deeper into madness. Although this may not do well to describe Cardiacs’ manic mix of punk rock and avant-prog, it should give a good indicator of the feeling “Sing to God” gives me as a listener. It’s catchy, experimental, and about as close to the peppy end of a manic depressive episode as I imagine music could aptly depict. Really, it’s pop music beyond words or sense, and I can’t seem to get enough of it.Among other things, punk music arose as an opposition to the bombast and overcomplexity of progressive rock. In lieu of this, it’s quite the irony to see Cardiacs not only fusing the two styles together, but doing so as if prog and punk were made for each other. “Sing to God” runs the gamut in terms of styles: a sense of symphonic bombast comparable to Yes is mixed with Beatles-esque baroque pop sensibilities and injected with the venom of pub- dwelling punk rock. These sounds- which would often conflict with each other in the ‘real’ world- are all fused with a viciously tongue-in-cheek attitude pleasantly reminiscent of Frank Zappa. I could also compare the band’s overdubbed vocal harmonies to Queen, or the general ‘what-the-hell-am-I-listening-to’ atmosphere to Mr. Bungle, but Cardiacs ultimately stand on a ground of their own. Did I forget to mention that the band manage to make this experimental chaos as catchy as the plague?Many of the songs on “Sing to God” rest on a tightrope between order and chaos. Many of the songs enjoy a level of comfort in catchy instrumental hooks and quaint vocal melodies. With the exception of a few tracks (most notably the cinematic-worthy “Dirty Boy”, the unsettling soundscape “Quiet as a Mouse” and some of the shorter musical sketches), the majority of “Sing to God” boasts a foundation in good old fashioned songwriting. Vocalist and mastermind Tim Smith has a zany and wildly charismatic voice that would have even fit comfortably into British alternative rock canon, were it not for the extent Cardiacs take their basic elements and contort them. Although some elements are best kept as a surprise for fresh listeners, be sure to expect everything from ‘chipmunk vocals’ to film score flourishes, classically-influenced pianos, circus music, hyperpunk rhythmic energy and everything in between. Of particular note are the extra-wacky tunes “Dog-Like Sparky”, “A Horse’s Tale” and “Dirty Boy”, a longer piece that gets remarkably profound and damned near celestial by the end of it. Tim Smith’s lyrics are a world of their own, and though there’s not often the sense that there’s an explicit meaning behind the absurdity, they’re absolutely fascinating within the context of such a chaotic album. Although- at an hour and a half- the album may be a little long for one comfortable sitting, there is no filler to speak of, although the first half is decidedly better than the latter.In spite of the zany effects, absurdly surreal lyrics, wall-of-sound production and mile-per- second flow of ideas, Cardiacs remain- at their core- a pop band, and “Sing to God” remains a pop album. In the end, it’s the interplay between the hyper-weird and catchy elements therein that makes the album so bloody fascinating. Depending on where your mental state may be at the time of listening, it will either be a trip through the most euphoric hyperparadise dreams could forge, or a reality-distrupting soundtrack to nightmares. Whatever way it may strike, “Sing to God” is pretty unforgettable, and it just may be the greatest experimental rock record I have ever had the strained pleasure of listening to." - Prog-Sphere
    $34.00
  • Vinyl edition. Falling Deeper finds Anathema reworking older material, backed by a 26 piece orchestra. The band is complemented by former Gathering vocalist Anneke van Giersbergen. Anathema - Danny talks us through Falling Deeper from Kscope on Vimeo. FOREIGN CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO THE HEAVIER WEIGHT OF VINYL WE MUST ADJUST YOUR SHIPPING CHARGES ACCORDINGLY.
    $23.00
  • New album from Swedish true metal gods comes in a nice digipak design and a bonus track - a cover of Malmsteen's "Rising Force". I never noticed that Anders Johansson plays drums for these cats...
    $14.00
  • "France's Darktribe makes their return to the power metal arena with their second effort, The Modern Age, now signed to Italy's Scarlet Records. It's basically a return to form for the band, generally a melodic metal foundation bumped up by power metal speed with some prog nuances thrown in.In this sense, there's nothing new under the sun for Darktribe. Yet there's some subtleties worth mentioning. Whether by the mixture of riffs, some keyboards tossed in, or the vocal arrangements, the songs sound really busy, like there's too much going on. Maybe it's the swell of layers. Possibly it's an artificial sense of business, even technicality. My Last Odyssey, No Train To Earth, and Anthem For A Planet are just a few songs that give me this feeling. If anything, in this mixture, guitarist Loïc Manuello riffs and leads seem to be predominant element within the band in each song. The riffage is large and sharp throughout, which probably twists the "artificial business" towards the more natural wall of sound.There's also a significant keyboard development within this album, mostly underneath and by accent. It seems larger than the previous album, but was three years ago and memory and my ears my be misleading me. You'll notice some of this at the beginning of My Last Odyssey or the middle of The Modern Age in a symphonic texture. But the latter could be merely guitar synths. Additionally, there's nice vocal harmonies, larger in arrangement, in some songs, like No Train To Earth (nice groove as well) and A Last Will, especially in the final moments.In the end, The Modern Age left me with a conundrum: it's more of the same from Darktribe, yet seems to be an advancement for the band as well. Alternatively, though interesting enough for several spins to review, I'm not so sure it's remarkable enough to listen again in the future. You may feel differently." - Dangerdog.com
    $15.00
  • New edition of the third album from this great Italian band - their last in their purely progmetal phase. Oleg Smirnoff comes up with killer keyboard lines through out but it's the vocals of Terrence Holler that sets this band apart. Perhaps their best effort, now augmented in this new remastered edition with 6 bonus tracks and a poster. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Maybe I have a soft spot for this album because it was the first Camel album I got turned on to. This great remastered edition features 3 bonus tracks. "Lunar Sea" is just as intense for me now as it was hearing it for the first time 26 years ago.Special digipak edition comes with a bonus CD recorded live at the Hammersmith Odeon in London on 4/14/76.
    $27.00
  • A future classic of progressive metal. Totally unique sound of extreme complexity and power. This Swedish band draws from different sources like Faith No More and Dream Theater but put a totally original spin on it.
    $12.00
  • "Back in the late eighties and early nineties I was a huge fan of that eras best thrash metal. Bands like Slayer, Testament, Death Angel, and Forbidden drew me in with machine gun double bass drums, lighting fast rhythms, and aggressive vocals. One Machine is the brainchild of guitarist Steve Smyth, best known for his stints in some of metals finest bands including Nevermore, Forbidden, Dragonlord, Vicious Rumours, and Testament, a stellar resume to be certain! For One Machine’s debut album, Smyth has formed a band that is compromised of a who’s who in the world of extreme/underground metal who were carefully selected by Smyth: Mikkel Sandager (Mercenary) on vocals, Jamie Hunt (Biomechanical) sharing guitar duties, rounded out by a powerhouse rhythm section with Tomas “O’Beast” Koefoed (Mnemic) on bass guitar and Michele Sanna on drums (although former drummer Raphael Saini of Italian progressive metallers Chaoswave played on the album). The Distortion Of Lies And The Overdriven Truth was recorded and produced by Steve Smyth. Mixing was handled by guitarist extraordinaire Roy Z (Judas Priest, Bruce Dickinson, Halford), mastered by Alan Douches (Three Inches Of Blood, Firewind, Sepultura) from West West Side Music with artwork created by Niklas Sundin from Cabin Fever Media (Dark Tranquillity, Arch Enemy), complimented with photography from Anthony Dubois (Meshuggah, Mnemic).The songs harken back to the 80′s Bay Area thrash movement of bands like Early Metallica, Testament, Death Angel, Exodus, and Forbidden and melds it with the classic metal style of Painkiller era Judas Priest and the melody of Vicious Rumours. Lead vocalist Sandager sings clean for the majority of the album but can growl out some extreme growl vocals as well as ear piercing screams that would make Rob Halford proud. He also has a vocal similarity to Russ from Forbidden in places (Crossed Over). Unlike a lot of their thrash metal forefathers, the band has a penchant for writing choruses with melodic and catchy hooks (Armchair Warriors). The music is chaotic at times (Killing The Hope Inside) almost to the point of no return, only to transition into a melodic passage that brings things back from the abyss. The guitar solos are as frenzied and speedy as the songs, at times reminding me of classic Slayer. What you have here are ten no nonsense slamming brutally heavy tracks that will make you want to jump in the pit. The title track sets the tone for the album with neck snapping, whiplash inducing headbanging thrash metal. There are some lighter moments such as in Kill The Light Inside and most notably the dark and moody mid-tempo of Last Star Alights, but for the most part, each song on the album takes a turn pummeling the listener with heavy riffs and brutal rhythms (see Evict the Enemy).One Machine is a band with a tremendous upside and possible crossover potential in the mainstream metal market with the right promotional push. Fans of Smyth’s revious work in Testament, Forbidden, and Nevermore will find a lot to love about this band, while fans of more melodic fare might be surprised to find lots of catchy melodies and hook laden choruses to sink their teeth into!" - Lady Obscure
    $15.00
  • Alphataurus was one of the great one and done Italian prog bands of the 70s. Who can forget that amazing triple fold out cover with the dove dropping bombs?This is a live reunion gig recorded at Bloom in Mazzago Italy during the ProgVention Festval on November 6, 2010. This live recording finds the band in astonishingly superb form. The CD edition is the band's complete performance. In addition to the entire self-titled album the band runs through some unreleased material from back in the day. Sound quality of the recording is completely professional. If you are fan of Alphataurus or Rock Progressivo Italiano in general this is a must own. If you are planning on seeing the band at Farfest it's a great way to become familiar with their material.
    $16.00
  • " Once audiences got a chance to hear Primus' instantly recognizable sound, driven by Les Claypool's bizarrely virtuosic bass riffs, their audience grew by leaps and bounds. It was enough to make their second major-label album, Pork Soda, one of the strangest records ever to debut in the Top Ten. Stylistically, it isn't much different from Sailing the Seas of Cheese, though the band does stretch out and jam more often. This can result in some overly repetitive sections, since Claypool's riffs are the basis for most of the compositions, but it also showcases the band's ever-increasing level of musicianship. Their ensemble interplay continues to grow in complexity and musicality, and that's really what fans want from a Primus record anyway. The material isn't quite as consistent as Seas of Cheese, though there are numerous high points; among them are "My Name Is Mud," on which Claypool plays his instrument like percussion, and "Mr. Krinkle," where he switches to a bowed upright bass. There are hints of lyrical darkness stripped of the band's usual goofiness (especially in the suicide lament "Bob"), but for the most part, the humor is again split between eccentric character sketches, cheery paranoia, and annoying novelties (with a slightly higher percentage of the latter than before). Still, despite occasional flaws, what makes Pork Soda a success is that the band keeps finding novel variations on their signature sound, even if they never step out of it." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Queen of AOR/hard rock is more appropos.
    $10.00
  • "In 2012 Katatonia released Last Fair Day Gone Night on vinyl (and vinyl only), which is a live compilation of shows the band played in 2011 and includes a performance on the band's 2001 Last Fair Deal Gone Down album in its entirety. Now the band will be releasing the same set on September 30 via Peaceville Records, which will also include two DVDs! One of the DVDs will be footage of the shows from the audio CD above and a second DVD will be a 20-year retrospective for the band.While the music portion is pretty damn good, I'm interested in the retrospective and to hear the band chronicle their history! Especially how they went from being a band playing stuff like Dance of December Souls to what they are now. A lot of that history is readily available online, but hearing the stories from the group will really bring it to life!"
    $20.00
  • This is a new project put together by ex-Xystus drummer Ivo van Dijk.  Its cut from a similar cloth to that band's Equilibrio album in that its a full blown epic all-star project.  While Equilibrio was based on an opera, Karmaflow is actually based on a video game that Ivo was involved in developing.  The album features the Metropole Orchestra and the following participants:Vocalists:Simone Simons - EpicaMark Jansen - Epica, MaYanDani Filth - Cradle Of FilthLindsay Schoolcraft - Cradle Of FilthMarc Hudson - DragonforceAlica White-Gluz - Arch EnemyElyse Ryd - AmarantheCharlotte Wessels - DelainHennning Basse - Rage, MaYanMariangela Demurtas - TristaniaTony Kakko - Sonata ArcticaDaniël de Jongh - TexturesLisette van den Berg - Scarlet StoriesBas Dolmans - XystusMusicians:Ariën van Weesenbeek - EpicaCoen Janssen - EpicaRuud Jolie - Within TemptationIvo Severijns - PowerplaySander Gommans - HDKMerel Bechtold - Delain, MaYan, Purest Of PainBob Wijtsma - Blaze Of DarknessLuuk van Gerven - After ForeverUri Dijk - Textures, EtherealWill SchutAnd did I mention the Metropole Orchestra?  Yes I did.  Again.This one is crazy good.  Highest recommendation.
    $14.00