Wolflight (2LP/CD)

SKU: 0507071
Label:
Inside Out Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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2LP gatefold vinyl edition includes the CD as well.  This version includes 3 bonus tracks, one of which is exclusive to this edition.

Well Steve is done resucitating the Genesis catalogue and back to concentrating on fresh solo material.  The new album Wolflight is a bit of a loose concept album and I find it to be one of his strongest releases in years.  The album is filled with lots of guests (including Chris Squire) contributing exotic instruments to the mix adding an old world sound.  Steve's trademark sound is locked into place so if you are looking for the wailing guitar, liquid runs and acoustic delicacy you won't be disappointed.  His vocals has never been my favorite part of a Steve Hackett album but either I've mellowed in age or his voice has - not sure which.  Regardless it fits the music just fine.  Classic Hackett and nothing less.  BUY OR DIE!

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  • Officially licensed vinyl reissue from the Greek Missing Vinyl imprint. First album from this great German band, originally released on Kuck Kuck in 1970. While later efforts would have jazz rock undertones, this debut plays it pretty straight ahead...well as straight ahead as a prog band from Germany in 1970 can sound. Remigius Drechsler's guitar leads vary from jangly to fuzzed out. Hennes Hering (future Sahara keyboardist) concentrates on organ and is definitely influenced by Rick Wright. Vocalist Moran Neumüller is passable but his main contribution to the band is flute and sax - both of which are featured lead instruments. Perhaps not their very best work but still a great one. Highly recommended.Official reissue from the Greek Missing Vinyl label - licensed from Kuckuck. Shockingly the band's lineup stayed intact for their second effort. The album featured better production and you can hear the band is a bit tighter. The jazz element is slightly turned up a notch as Moran Neumüller's sax work is going full blast and with much more authority. Hannes Hering's organ really rips - he's much more agressive than on Wake Up. Remigius Drechsler has a psych/blues edge to his guitar leads. Overall one in reminded a bit of Traffic at their jamming best. One of the great German prog albums of the 70s. Highly recommended.Foreign customers please note we may have to adjust your shipping charges to to the extra weight of the vinyl.
    $29.00
  • Limited edition double vinyl set.The Odyssey finds the band striking out in a new direction and frankly the results are stunning. Essentially the band made their statement album of neoclassical metal with the "V" release so there really was no point in going further. There is more agression in Russel Allen's voice and Mike Romeo's guitarwork is a crunch machine. This is progressive to the max - the 24 minute title track is a future classic and the sequel "Accolade II" lives up to the original. The overall production simply explodes - gone is the lush symphonics of "V" - this is right in your face. Mike Pinella's trademark blistering synth leads are all over the place and he trades off with Romeo just the way you want them to. What is missing is the symphonic landscapes that linked the different pieces together. I say...2003 is upon us...this new Symphony X is slightly different from the old Symphony X but just as good. Prog and power metal fans need not worry - they have delivered the goods with a surprising twist!
    $17.00
  • "Progressive rock and boy-band pop seem like natural enemies at first. The former's fascination with ornate, elongated passages of finger-exhausting musicianship is in almost every way the opposite of the latter's emphasis on catchiness first; it's hard to imagine turn-of-the-millennium hits like "Bye Bye Bye" with extended guitar and keyboard solos. Yet ever since A Doorway to Summer, their 2005 debut, Moon Safari has put to rest the notion that progressive-minded songwriters can't make pop that's as hook-driven as it is ostentatious. Grandiloquent epics like "Other Half of the Sky," from the 2008 double album Blomljud, weave together widescreen arrangements with the band's signature five-part vocal harmony, a feature unmatched by few groups in any genre, anywhere. It's easy to isolate the audience with solipsistic soloing and obtuse orchestrations, but from day one Moon Safari has made prog that—assuming the layperson were more amenable to songs that run upwards of thirty minutes—could lead them to something like a pop crossover hit.But while the union of hook-heavy vocal interplay and '70's prog stylistics gives Moon Safari an unmistakable, unique sound, it also handicapped them in a significant way for their first two LPs. The group's accessibility on A Doorway to Summer and Blomljud, along with its technical prowess, is unassailable, but the high-fructose sweetness of its style leads to a diabetic rush when stretched out onto songs that span ten to thirty minutes. For example, "Other Half of the Sky," the titanic thirty minute showstopper off of Blomljud, has so many memorable hooks that by the time it's run its time out, it's hard to remember all of them. The classic problem of "too many voices leads to a noisy room" was the defining problem of Moon Safari's otherwise enjoyable sound for some time. All that changed, however, in 2010 with the release of Lover's End.It is no exaggeration—even as the decade remains young—to say that Lover's End is one of the finest progressive rock records of the '00's. Hell, it's not even crazy to say that it's one of the finest pop albums of the '00s; anyone, even those turned off by prog's eccentricities, can find something to love on this mellifluous collection of songs. From the a cappella charm of "Southern Belle" to the hook-loaded "New York City Summergirl," Lover's End is chock full of goodness from beginning to end. What explains its genius is that in contrast to A Doorway to Summer and Blomljud, the songs are given exactly the amount of space they need, and not a second more. Some songwriters may feel hamstrung by the verse/chorus structure, but it's a perfect fit for Moon Safari's joyous approach to music.With their newest studio outing, Himlabacken, Vol. 1, Moon Safari continue the refining of their sound, and while this isn't the breakthrough that Lover's End was, it nonetheless attests to the brilliance of this group. Whereas the latter was bound by a loose concept (love and heartbreak), Himlabacken Vol. 1 is less a lyrics album than its predecessor. The cost of this is that the music is less distinct in its cohesiveness, but there are no shortage of catchy passages and amped-up solos. "Mega Moon" comes off as a tribute to musical theatre, with "The Very Model of A Modern Major General" vocal delivery interweaving with Queen-esque bombast to an impressive effect. "Too Young to Say Goodbye" sees and matches the polyharmonic beauty of "Lover's End (Part One)." By sticking to concise song formats—the longest cut here runs nine and a half minutes—Moon Safari ensures that things never run out of steam, an essential quality to any good progressive rock band.If nothing else, Himlabacken, Vol. 1 proves that there's one thing Moon Safari can't be accused of: being unaware of themselves. Grand finale "Sugar Band" is as much a statement of identity as it is a slice of epic pop: "Sweet and saccharine are we," they declare, followed by "syrup's the blood in our veins." (Less successful is the clumsy Katy Perry innuendo of, "suck our big candy canes," which is thematically consistent but tonally off.) Both "Sugar Band" and "Little Man," one of the few Moon Safari songs to feature a solo vocal, are emblematic of the mushiness that might turn some prog fans away from their music. The latter, while obviously a touching document of a father's love for his son, does feel a bit out of place in how deeply personal it is; part of the strength of this group's sonic is the universality of its pop appeal, and the intimacy behind "My Little Man" makes listening to it an almost voyeuristic experience. "Mega Moon" and "Sugar Band" are better at capturing the convivial spirit of the band that's accessible to all.As with past outings, even those drawn to vocal harmonies might find it hard to stomach all of the sweetness of Himlabacken, Vol. 1. But what ultimately makes this LP successful is its unpretentious commitment to fun. Moon Safari are a rare collective that prove daunting musical chops aren't anathema to accessibility, and with Himlabacken, Vol. 1 they've made a recording that, while not the magnum opus that Lover's End was, is as true a capturing of their ethos as there could ever be. Sating a sweet tooth brings to mind the phrase "guilty pleasure," but there's no guilt involved with music as first-class as this. Who knew being in a boy band could sound so classy? " - Sea Of Tranquility
    $16.00
  • GPS is essentially John Payne's version of Asia featuring Ryo Okumoto on keys, Guthrie Govan on guitar, and Jay Schellen on drums.  The DVD was filmed at the O-West in Tokyo on 10/14/07.  The material draws from Asia and GPS with the obligatory solos.  As a bonus you get an acoustic in store show as well as the "GPS Jazz Trio".  The 2CDs are the audio soundtracks to the DVD performance at the O-West.  This is billed as Volume One.  I believe there is a gig from the UK that is in the pipeline for later release.
    $11.00
  • "Alice Cooper's third album, Love It to Death, can be pinpointed as the release when everything began to come together for the band. Their first couple of albums (Pretties for You and Easy Action) were both largely psychedelic/acid rock affairs and bore little comparison to the band's eventual rip-roaring, teenage-anthem direction. The main reason for the quintet's change was that the eventually legendary producer Bob Ezrin was on board for the first time and helped the Coopers focus their songwriting and sound, while they also perfected their trashy, violent, and theatrical stage show and image. One of the band's most instantly identifiable anthems, "I'm Eighteen," was what made the album a hit, as well as another classic, "Is It My Body." But like Alice Cooper's other albums from the early '70s, it was an incredibly consistent listen from beginning to end. The garage rocker "Caught in a Dream" as well as the ass-kicking "Long Way to Go" and a pair of epics -- the Doors-esque "Black Juju" and the eerie "Ballad of Dwight Fry" -- showed that Alice was easily in league with other high-energy Detroit bands of the era (MC5, Stooges). Love It to Death was the first of a string of classic releases from the original Alice Cooper group." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "Death.Taxes.Ozric Tentacles.Since 1984 this loose collective have been releasing reliably great music from the mind of leader Ed Wynne. Their margin of error is enviably tiny – there is no such thing as a bad Ozrics album. Sure, some are better than others, but the body of work is as inescapably consistent as mortality and societal contributions. Technicians of the Sacred is their fifteenth studio album, second double album and the first release in this format since Erpland in 1990. It is also one of the best they have ever recorded.The blend of electronica and inner-space rock is instantly recognisable with ‘The High Pass’. World music and gently undulating synths take their time to ease us back into the required frame of cosmic consciousness. It takes almost 6 minutes for the secret weapon, Wynne’s signature lysergic lead guitar, to be deployed and that is the modus operandi of the whole album – nothing is rushed, each track unfolds lotus-like.‘Changa Masala’ distils all the band’s ingredients into a spicy side-dish. Sequencers, vocal samples and a reggae skank provide the base while acoustic guitar rips like a John McLaughlin solo, interjecting a nod to their past, a musical in-joke for the fans, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet heard it.The Steve Hillage (Gong, System 7 and sometime Ozrics collaborator) influence is foregrounded in the first disc’s closer, ‘Switchback’. Tap-delay guitar slithers over a web of ambient keyboard washes. Portamento bass notes slide and glide their way through the patchouli-scented psychedelic haze.f the first disc was an aromatic treat, then the second is manna. ‘Epiphlioy’ recalls the classic ‘Saucers’. Its serpentine twelve-string acoustic riffs employ Eastern modes to evoke a scene that is paradoxically earthy and otherworldly. Staccato strings conjure Kashmir while a celestial orchestra of whooshing keyboard pads threatens to levitate us into the stratosphere and beyond. We are back in the bizarre bazaar, folks. Brandi Wynne pins down the ethereal mix with a heavy dub bassline. The track changes constantly. This is the most compositionally complex music the band has ever produced.While there are references to Ozric history and a more organic feel similar to early classics with the occasional use of non-electric instruments and ethnic voices, the album as a whole is a step forward. The painstakingly crafted symbiosis of synthesised sounds and rock instrumentation, coupled with a slick production, lend Technicians of the Sacred a holistic integrity not heard since Jurassic Shift (which incidentally entered the UK charts at a very respectable number 11 in 1993). The whole gels together and flows with the multi-layered sophistication of a symphony while retaining some of the jam-band aesthetic of the free festival days.‘Smiling Potion’ features interlocking sequences even Tangerine Dream would be proud of and a tribal metronome-sense beat straight out of Peter Gabriel’s soundtrack for The Last Temptation of Christ.As ‘Rubbing Shoulders With The Absolute’ throbs along on a blissed-out dub rhythm artificially generated voices ensure the weirdness meter is kept firmly in the red.Hungarian drummer Balázs Szende makes his first studio appearance and throughout the album he proves to be a superb addition to the group, whether approximating the tight programmed style of The Hidden Step era or, as on the closing track, ‘Zenlike Creature’, tackling elusive prog time signatures with ease and finesse. As Ed Wynne winds up a solo worthy of fusion maestros Mahavishnu Orchestra he introduces a shimmering Hillage-esque repeating motif that stays in the mind long after the music has stopped.Technicians of the Sacred, for all its dynamic shifts and intricacies, is a very chilled-out release, one for relaxing to and for transportation to the other, wherever that may be. There are no jarring wig-out rock guitar hero sections or all-out sonic attacks like ‘The Throbbe’. Rather this is Ozric Tentacles’ most cohesive and accomplished effort in almost 20 years and a highlight of a long and peerless career." - Echoes And Dust
    $13.00
  • OK I have to say this right up front...Toyz is a terrible name for a band.  It conjures up images of some long forgotten hair metal band - and these guys just ain't that at all.Toyz is actually a very talented instrumental symphonic rock band from the Netherlands.  There is one familiar name in the band.  Guitarist Peter van Heijningen may be known to you as the lead guitarist on the first Knight Area album "The Sun Also Rises".  On this album he lays down some beautiful melodic solos filled with tons of energy - but he's not the whole show.  Keyboardist Arjan van Gog plays his b***s off here as well.  Plenty of lead synth and piano work well as a foil for the axe work with plenty of back and forth soloing. So an unfortunate name but a great debut.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • One of the best progressive albums of the 90s now available as a limited edition 2LP vinyl set.
    $14.00
  • "UK act SUNDAY was a trio consisting of Jimmy Forest (piano, organ, vocals), John Barclay (guitar, vocals) and Davy Patterson (vocals, bass). This Scottish act issued their one and only production in 1972, a self-titled effort. Other than that, little is known about this obscure outfit from the early 70's. 'This is the only album from this band. Style wise, they are somewhere between Santana and Deep Purple. In short, funky rock with tonnes of Hammond organs and guitars. The first three Deep Purple albums is a good reference, but their music is also as funky and lively as Santana. Quality wise, this is a good album. The long Hammond organ runs by Jimmy Forest is what makes this album a good album. They are underpinned by some good vocals, guitars, bass and drums. The songs are overall good with some flashes of superb melodies. The ten minutes long Sad Man Reaching Utopia is a great epic which changes between light and dark. The rest of the album is good though and I have grown to really be fond of it. This is a nice album for those who appreciate vintage rock.' " - ProgArchives
    $24.00
  • It s nice to hear a band like Siena Root playing it for real in this overly-processed world that we live in. Power to them, and I wish them all the success in the world! - Mick Box (Uriah Heep)"Siena Root is an experienced live act and an experimental project with its roots in analogue old school rock music. The group was founded in Stockholm in the late 90s. The sound is classic but yet original, based on heavy organ, howling guitars, bass riffing and big drums. It is also often enriched with bluesy soulful vocals, various guest musicians and psychedelic vibes.Siena Root is well known for its unique spectra of appearances, its many great guest artists, its broad musical range and its different interpretations of rock music. Yet, with a foundation in a traditional quintet, and a sound rooted in late 60s analogue gear. Don't expect to experience the same Siena Root show twice.In the sense that blues is blue, hard rock is black, and reggae is pan African coloured, this music has the colour of siena. It is a warm colour, originally from the muddy roots of the earth. Because this sound has roots that go deep, it was also natural to let root be a part of the bands name.Four full length studio albums, one live album, one DVD and two 7 singles have been released so far, each one marking the development and refinement of the bands diverse style. Through touring the music has developed in such a way, that jamming and improvising has become an essential element, always keeping you on the edge of your seat. A Siena Root concert is dramatic and exciting, visually, as well as emotionally. It's a dynamic root rock experience.""The musical world is rich and powerful and that is also a correct description of Siena Root's music. This is a Swedish hard rock band which aren't very progressive but still play in a progressive spirit or a psychedelic mood, without being psychedelic thankfully. "Pioneers" which is totally new is their fifth record and all their records has got very high (but few) ratings on this site. Especially their first "A new day dawning" from 2003 and their third "Far from the sun" from 2008. 2014 year's record follows a five year spectrum of now records. Their record has a lovely cover with a yellow landscape and the sillouettes of the five band-members heads in the background sky. Left from former line up is Love Forsberg, the band's drummer and Sam Riffer, the band's bassist. Otherwise the lead guitarist and organist KG West is gone as well as the lead vocalist Sartez Faraj. They are replaced by the keyboardist Erik Errka Petersson(who has played with my choir actually), the new vocalist Jonas Åhlén and the guitarist Matte Gustafsson."Pioneers" is a record of very high standard music which will please folk who like the hard rock of the late sixties and early seventies. The music is straight and melodic, filled with heavy organ sound and a caressing hard rock vocal. The musicians themselves has beautiful beards and it's obvious they love what they are doing. The only shame is that they have chosen to sing in English, that makes their music less interesting. I compare with the Norwegian band Höst which did a better choice. But still this music is lovely and very pleasurable. I think almost every track is similarily good but "In my kitchen" is absolutely the best(9/10), calmer and more atmospheric than the others. "Between the lines" and "Root rock pioneers" are two other songs I recommend(8/10). The record is extremely even so you won't find any bad or uninteresting tracks. This is specially a band and a record for fans of classical hard rock such as the late sixties' Deep Purple. This record is definitely at least a four star record. Recommended!" - ProgArchives
    $13.00
  • White Willow mastermind Jacob Lupo-Holm has been threatening to unleash a solo album for years now and it has finally arrived. There has always been a lighter, poppier side that has turned up on each White Willow album. The Opium Cartel displays this through out. The music has a dreamy, laid back quality that is quite gorgeous and serene. Plenty of prog elements are present - Mellotron and multi-keyboards are the backbone of the album. There is a good reason for this - the album reads like a who's who of Scandinavian prog. Mattias Olsson (Anglard) plays drums and tons of keys. White Willow members (past and present) are featured - Lars Fredrik Froislie (keyboards), Ketil Einarsen (flutes) - even former rhythm guitarist/bassist Johannes Saeboe is on a track. Current WW vocalist Rhys Marsh is featured as is Rachel Haden (how Jacob pulled that off is anyone's guess). Although not an album of super-complexity it is a very involving listen that demands your attention. HIghly recommended.
    $16.00
  • New vinyl pressing of the band's magnificent second album.  Remastered numbered limited edition of 500 copies.  Gatefold sleeve and has a nice large fold out poster.
    $32.00
  • "Art pop collective The Opium Cartel return after their much-acclaimed debut with their sophomore effort "Ardor". Featuring a stellar cast including No-Man/Henry Fool's Tim Bowness and Stephen Bennett, White Willow/Änglagård drummer Mattias Olsson, as well as members of Wobbler, Jaga Jazzist and Pixel, not to mention two of Norway's foremost vocal talents; Venke Knutson and Alexander Stenerud. The project is helmed by White Willow guitarist/songwriter Jacob Holm-Lupo. While continuing the atmospheric, slo-mo proggy pop sound of the first album, this new album is a somewhat different beast, taking inspiration from 80's art pop icons like The Blue Nile, Japan, Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush, as well as drawing on the contemporary electronic pop of bands like M83. This will also appeal to fans of adventurous indie acts like Field Music, Everything Everything, Sunset Rubdown and The Week That Was." 
    $16.00
  • Limited edition vinyl EP released in 2013 available at a bargain price.  Majeure is the pseudonym for A.E. Paterra - 1/2 of the Zombi duo.  Paterra plays all analog symtns as well as real and sampled drums.  If you are a fan of 80s Tangerine Dream this one will blast you into space."With the legacy of Zombi now in stone, it’s been a treat to see co-founding member A.E. Paterra take on his musical path under the Majeure moniker. The sound of Majeure sticks to the analog realm, bringing a warmth and texture base that is reminiscent of the most experimental records of the 70’s. Releasing the debut LP Timespan a few years back and following up shortly afterwards with Solar Maximum, the skilled multi-instrumentalist is back with the good people at Temporary Residence Ltd. for the release of his latest outing Romance Language. I was really drawn to the first two full lengths and their unique brands of synthesizer heavy space prog dance music and the fact that a majority of Romance Language is devoid of percussion adds a special quality to the presentation. The unrestricted movement of the synths finds much more unique paths and I feel the quality of the music retains a timeless tone because of it. The journey is tranquil and ambient with Romance Language and it’s been a favorite album for relaxation over the last few months. The album consists of two long songs that each grace a side of the 12″ (“Romance Language” b/w Falcon Searider”), bringing together  a sense of meditative continuity in the first half that is a perfect projecting base for the change in energy on the second. The album lands in a sunburst 80’s synth groove by the ending section of the album, bursting out of the hazy and murky corridors of expression the second song begins with. Out of all three albums, Romance Language is my favorite of Majeure’s and has been under the radar among those close this year.The albums title track clocks in at 11:31 and spirals in shifting patterns within the first few bars. It’s a very bright and sequenced set of loops that rotates around one another with supplied with subtle additives of the most experimental kind. The deep swelling of sustained waves from the next synth enters the low end spectrum with a lot of depth around the sequenced loops. You can really feel the human element at this point and it continues to glow and shine brighter by the measure. It’s one of the most fluid and ethereal sound Majeure has created to date and it sent me into an immediate hypnotic state upon initial contact. It’s the kind of music that is excellent in closing ones eyes and getting lost inside of the abstract framework of synthetic layering present. The 4:00 mark cuts out the spiraling loops, leaving the atmospheric wind tones and sustained oscillations of synth to drift into the next scene with a psychedelic pathway through out. This lands into the first true progression of rhythmic stability, grabbing onto a loop that is much more grounded and forward in motion. The overtones add the shifting and transforming aura, encasing the song into an entirely different display of emotions through each major section. The soothing nature of the synth that mirrors a flute is mesmerizing, gently playing into the towering repetition of the synth that keeps the rhythm in lock. This soothing synth is then given time to bond solely with the wind tones hovering in the background, creating another immensely beautiful section of music from the mind of Majeure. It’s the kind of ominous approach that’s perfectly for the most potent and complex films.The darkened nature of the first sides ending is brought into the abyss even further with the sequence of layering that begins “Falcon Searider.” A gloomy and drafty scene comes to mind as the song evolves. It’s fascinating to realize how much the scenery has changed since the beginning sequences of the first side and what’s occurring in the first few minutes of the second. The distinct quality of analog gear for the recording of this song is undeniable and it’s with this tone that I am really drawn to every single moment. Small shades of overtones keep stacking over the core and it eventually begins to draw a sense of note configurations as these layers build. It all boils though, never moving too far from the cores growing levels of heat. Around 4:40, the dynamics of the music change entirely and the most drastically on the album. The drafty sounds part ways like clouds in their last moments blocking the sun. The synth line that draws the entire rhythm together has a Michael Jackson thriller feel. Dark and mysterious but groove based to the highest levels. The addition of a drum machine is the icing on the cake, giving way to the influences that defined his last album Solar Maximum. The progression of layers finds an incredible apex section after the 9:00 mark, blasting into the next hemisphere with pitch shifted synth lines and the never ending glow of the rhythm section. A simple fade at the end gives the ending a perfect nod to the 80’s synth movement.Romance Language has been a rewarding listen this year and I find that its meaning becomes even more enriched with every listen. It’s a perfect album for anyone who love analog based synth music and speaks volumes about the future state of music that Majeure continues to tap into. Nobody is doing it like Majeure when it comes to this field of expression and I feel Romance Language is his best effort to date." - Sound Colour Vibration
    $6.00