All Rights Removed (2LP Vinyl)

SKU: KAR066LP
Label:
Karisma Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Second album from this Norwegian band finds them climbing the ladder of melancholy prog bands. Short on complexity but long on atmosphere and melody, Airbag's new one packs an emotional wallop. The album has just enough spacey keyboards to draw comparisons to Pink Floyd and older Porcupine Tree. The album builds up to the 17 minute "Homesick I - III" which has enough references to Wish You Were Here that you'll be plowing through your Floyd collection afterwards. Lethal atmospheric prog that will annihilate the minds of any Anathema or Riverside fan. Highly recommended.  180 gram double LP vinyl set cut form the analogue masters specifically for vinyl.

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  • Termo Records reissue program of the White Willow catalog continues.  This remastered edition features new artwork and liner notes as well as 4 previously unreleased bonus tracks.Seven songs of melancholy and mysticism... White Willow's music embraces gothic, folk and classical elements within a progressive rock framework. The second release from Norway's White Willow carries on in the tradition of their debut Ignis Fatuus. Joining founders Jacob Holm-Lupo and Jan Tariq Rahman are new members Frode Lia, Sylvia Erichsen and Anglagard's Mattias Olsson. Also returning is engineer Jo Wang who's audiophile approach to recording has once again created a sonic masterpiece. Ex Tenebris features a dynamic mix - from moody quiet instrospection to heavy symphonic pyrotechnics. Perhaps more personal and focused than Ignis Fatuus, yet the album offers a more mature sound. Clearly one of the finest progressive rock bands currently recording.
    $16.00
  • "Progressive Power Metal was a genre popularized by titans such as ICED EARTH and NEVERMORE, combining the technicality, speed and fantastical lyrics of power, and the complexity and maturity of Prog. TRAGODIA, a Progressive Power Metal band from Italy, have proved once again why the genre is in such a strong position in the metal world, and why it is nigh-faultless. Writing music that exudes heavy influence from the aforementioned bands, TRAGODIA add their own brand of catchiness and groove to make it their own. After all, the whole point of a progressive band is to be progressive and push genre boundaries.Their new album, "Mythmaker", contains almost all of the great qualities of such an album: it's heavy, it's melodic, it's progressive, it's catchy, it's heavy, it's groovy, it's…  Heavy. It is by no means calm and jazzy, such as some of the work from the penultimate DREAM THEATER. In the mixing, the heavily over-driven guitars, and the drums, are at the forefront, adding vertebrae to the heavyweight backbone that drives this album. "A Cry Among the Stars", the opening, and one of my favorite song on the album, begins with an epic buildup reminiscent of SERENITY, cuts in with riffage worthy of neck snapping headbanging which paves the way for verses that contain an obvious DREAM THEATER note of trippy syncopation. Lucas Meloni, proves to have some vocal versatility, often switching between majestic, powerful notes, and Thrash-like yells. The twin guitarists have already proven, in the song's solo, that they are capable of an incredible dual-axe attack. "The Oracle" is one of the heaviest tracks on the album with crushing riffage all around, supplemented by guitar harmony that is on a Scandinavian level; best solo on the album, and there are many to choose from. "A Temple in Time" is a relatively chilled-out track in comparison, with an incredibly catchy guitar / keyboard harmony. I am hearing a lot of old FIREWIND in this track. The next track, "Wisdom in the Meadows of Sorrow" comes across as a highly versatile track, combining riffage reminiscent of AMON AMARTH, and the wails of JUDAS PRIEST; overall, this creates an incredibly driving track. "Tidal Waves of Greatness" is exactly that; smooth, yet anxious transitions between acoustic passages and grandiose and dramatic choruses. "Once In Arcadia" is another dominating heavyweight with riffage that is not only devastating, but also extremely catchy; very reminiscent of IN FLAMES; another standout track for me. "The Stone and the Idol" is the longest track on the record, though only capping out at 6:21. It starts with an allusion to yet even more epicenes with a tasteful symphonic intro, and leads into extremely groovy riffage, and ends with the best outro riff on the entire record."Born Under Niobe" may be constituted as the heaviest track, which is definitely saying something. The song begins with a downright battery and harsh, thrashy vocals, and riffage so heavy that leaves your brain pulsing with the force of the kicks. The chorus' vocal melody is extremely catchy, and Meloni proves his excellent vocal capabilities. It leaves you completely unprepared for a repeat of the previous bombard, and soon we hear a classic gallop passage that leaves one with the urge to windmill the beards off that the song has just made us grow. "Mythmaker" is an interesting track, opening with an unexpected tapping bass solo that paves the way for some pounding, driving groove riffage that constitutes the majority of the song, and leads seamlessly into the fantastic instrumental, "The Weeping Rock Of Seriphus". Arguably, this song doubles as both an outro and an extension of "Mythmaker", concluding the album in a dramatic, lengthy fashion. Finally, the bonus track, "Downfall Of The Ancients"; I struggle to see why this song was left out as a bonus track, for it most definitely deserves to be on the record. The atmospheric keyboard tracking is absolutely gorgeous, and complements the song very fittingly; with the rugged vocal work, combines to make a highly engaging track.To sum up this work of metal mastery, TRAGODIA are simply one of the reasons Progressive and Power Metal are my two favorite genres of Metal, and do their home country of Italy proud; absolutely deserving of more publicity, and I believe would make an unforgettable live performance." - Metal Temple
    $14.00
  • Newly remixed by Steven Wilson. Lots of stuff here. The CD features the original stereo mix plus three bonus tracks - trio versions of "Red" and "Fallen Angel" plus the full version of "Providence". The real action takes place on the 5.1 DVD remix. In addition to the album completely remixed into 5.1 you get bonus video taken from that legendary French television performance from 1974. That in itself is worth the price of the set. As far as the DVD goes there are lots of options in terms of audio playback. If you are one of the 3 people on the planet with a DVD-Audio player you can play this back in 24/48 5.1 or 24/96 stereo. Any DVD player can play back the 24/48 DTS 5.1 surround mix but there is also a 24/48 LPCM stereo mix as well.
    $19.00
  • "Periphery have been an omnipresent force in the prog metalcore realm since their first album released in 2010 – band founder Misha Mansoor has served as producer on several of the genre’s albums, and the other members are all famous in their own right, whether it’s simply for their craft (Matt Halpern), their involvement in other projects (Spencer Sotelo, Mark Holcomb, Nolly Getgood), or just simply being the nephew of someone exceedingly famous (Jake Bowen). This makes whatever they decide to do extremely important, and the band’s decision to release a concept double album has created hype of hugelargic proportions. In my humble opinion, the band has delivered on all fronts, but not without some disappointments in the “could’ve been” area.Since their inception, Periphery have changed from a chugga-chug ambidjent project posting demos on the internet in the late 2000s to a full-fledged prog metal band with heavy elements of metalcore, post-hardcore, and pop music in general. If you weren’t onboard for “Periphery II”, “Juggernaut” likely won’t change your mind (unless your issues were relatively small), as it’s more of the same poppy atmosphere and less of the techy downtuned riffs, though god knows THOSE are still around. But there’s also a lot of style experimentation – jazz fusion, death metal, and various forms of electronica are all utilized on a semi-normal basis, and range from being seamlessly integrated into the music to being tacked on to the ends of songs like gluing a top-rate dildo onto an already particularly throbby penis. If this all sounds a bit schizophrenic, rest assured that the songcraft is, for the most part, tighter than it’s ever been. Singles from Alpha like “22 Faces” and “Alpha” itself show off Periphery’s pop prowess with choruses and hooks that refuse to leave your head, and complex riffs that are somehow just as ‘wormy as the vocals. And the songs on Omega are longer, more complex, and still manage to be as infectious as the most annoying of STDs – even the twelve minute sprawling title track that has more in common with the bombastic riffs of Periphery I has a shapely middle section that rivals even the hottest of…ugh, fuck it, done with the metaphors. It’s just insane. I cried when I heard it.And now onto what I don’t care for; first off, the decision to split the album into two parts was definitely well-informed from a marketing standpoint. Most people don’t go around listening to 80 minute records all day, myself included, and the supposedly delicate structure of a concept album also means that listening to Juggernaut by skipping to different songs would devalue the experience. So the band broke it into two records to make it seem more manageable to listen to in daily life. Another stated reason was so that newcomers to the band would be able to buy Alpha at a discounted price, decide if they liked it, and then purchase Omega if they were so inclined (music previewing doesn’t work like that anymore, but hey you can’t fault the band for trying to turn that into tangible record sales). The problem I have is that Omega isn’t really paced to be its own album, which makes releasing it on its own instead as simply as the second disc in a package a little pointless. It’s not like the excellent “The Afterman” double albums from Coheed and Cambria, which were each albums that worked in their own right. I realize that this is really just semantics, but I think calling Juggernaut both the third and fourth album from Periphery, while technically correct, is just disingenuous, and judging them fairly on their own as separate albums is impossible (which is why all reviews being published are including them together).Periphery has always had a unique way of pacing their albums, regularly including playful, sometimes relatively lengthy interludes between tracks. Juggernaut is no different, and these interludes are now occasionally used to seed songs that will appear later on the album, or provide callbacks to tracks already present. The transitions aren’t always elegant however, and can range from grin-inducing to head-scratching to just plain grating. Thankfully, the band isn’t going for the illusion that each song flows seamlessly into the next, at least no more than they were going for it on any of their previous albums, and it’s easy to get used to everything given multiple listens.Overall, Juggernaut is a dense album that’s going to take a myriad of listens to fully sink in, just like most of the band’s prior releases (I don’t think anyone is gonna argue that “Clear” has any depth that you would find after about the fifth listen or so, but hey hey that’s ok kay). But it’s also accessible on the surface with deceptively simple rhythms and poppy choruses, which draw you in to appreciate the deeper cuts. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes unique and thoughtful music in the post-hardcore, metalcore, and progressive metal genres, but I’d also recommend it to anyone ever, because this is my absolute favorite band and I think they’ve created a masterpiece. So take from that what you will, and then get the fuck out of here. The play button is calling my name." - iprobablyhateyourband.com
    $11.00
  • Live recording from 2012 at the Rites of Spring Festival in Gettysburg PA USATracklist CD1:When the world is caving inWhere earth meets the skyTurn it upDo U tango?1969EternallyCD2:Send a message from the heartUndertow/When the world is caving in repriseJonas Reingold: BassguitarMorgan Ågren: DrumsGöran Edman: VocalsNils Erikson: Keys and VocalsLalle Larsson: KeysKrister Jonsson: Guitars 
    $15.00
  • In 1994, The Laser's Edge had a short lived sister label called The Labyrinth.  Sailor Free was part of the roster and released a beautiful psychedelic hard rock album called The Fifth Door.  After that the band went silent.  19 years later, vocalist David Petrosino and guitarist Stefano "The Hook" Barelli have reactivated the band and it sounds as though nothing has changed.  Spiritual Revolution is a concept album influenced by J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Silmarillion".  Sailor Free's music has a hard rock feel but due to Barelli's wicked soloing there is a psychedelic energy imbued in the music.  Petrosino is simply a great singer.  In an obtuse way he reminds me of Jim Morrison.  He doesn't really sound like him but he channels a dark spiritual energy into every word he sings.  There are some nice keyboard embellisments along the way but really this is a guitar driven album.  Welcome back old friends.  You were missed!
    $11.00
  • "Stagnation, formula, expectations – these words have long been banned from the lexicon of LONG DISTANCE CALLING. It is this irreverent attitude that has fueled them to record three albums, play several tours throughout Europe, garner slots on renowned festivals such as Rock am Ring, Summer Breeze, Wave-Gotik-Treffen or Roadburn and even secured them an impressive #36 in the German Media Control Charts. But if you thought these successes would convince LONG DISTANCE CALLING to settle into form with their fourth album, “The Flood Inside”, the band instead attempted an even bolder metamorphosis.Flashback: In early April 2012, LONG DISTANCE CALLING amicably parted ways with founding member and electronic wizard, Reimut von Bonn. Von Bonn’s departure however opened up new possibilities for the remaining members. The band had previously worked with guest-singers such as John Bush (Armored Saint, Anthrax) or Jonas Renkse (Katatonia) and they felt the new material was shaping up differently and gravitating away from purely instrumental rock. “We just noticed that adding a voice simply made sense. Stagnation and special formulas are not our thing, so making the step was easy.” Since all members in LONG DISTANCE CALLING have diverse tastes in music it was easy for them to decide what they were NOT looking for: no screamers or a whiny shoegazers. Instead, a timeless rocking voice in the vein of Faith No More or Soundgarden: a role perfectly suited for Martin “Marsen” Fischer (Pigeon Toe, ex-Fear My Thoughts). “We met Marsen on tours we did together. Hence, we knew each other on a personal level and we were certain that we would match perfectly when it comes to the music. The fact that he is playing keyboards is a nice add-on, as he is also in charge of them live.”Despite the changes, “The Flood Inside” remains intrinsically LONG DISTANCE CALLING. “We questioned a lot and did a whole lot of fine tuning this time. A part is as long as it needs to be, but we took our time to discuss and revise every single one of them. Many ideas make many parts, but a good song always needs a certain flow. That was the overall aim.” The plan came together and resulted in countless parts that should cause the Serotonin to flow. The band further explains: “What really characterizes our sound is the combination of cool and heavy riffs with melodies that come without any kitsch.” The band had guest vocalists before, however this time you don’t just get one track with vocals, but three with the same vocalist.“It is always exciting to see what other people can do with your songs. We as artists as well as our music can only gain from the input. It is all about adding talent and an extra level. The genre is secondary. The range of the album should speak for itself.” Indeed, “The Flood Inside” features collaborations will names as varied as Vincent Cavanagh (Anathema), blues talent Henrik Freischlader and Jahcoozi-mastermind Robot Koch (known from his work with Casper, Max Mutzke or Marteria). Additionally, there is the Norwegian singer/songwriter Petter Carlsen, Tuneverse co-founder Alex Komlew and Mario Cullmann (formerly known as DJ Coolman for Fünf Sterne Deluxe). “We have never bowed down to any rules for what you may or may not do as an instrumental band. It is only us making the rules.”In art, rules exist to be broken. Atmosphere and diversity don’t always conform to the parameters of the 3:30 song structure. Yet “The Flood Inside” [produced by Martin Meinschäfer at Megaphon Tonstudios in Arnsberg, Germany] is a lot more focused and compact than any of its predecessors. “The past 12 months were emotionally draining: charts, splitting with a member, new album and new singer… The Flood Inside is a summary of everything and all the emotions around and within us. That is the not so simple idea behind the title. It shows the entire spectrum of life: joy, grief, euphoria, anger and everything in between. How to deal with emotions is a huge part of everyday life. Nevertheless a lot of things are happening in the grey areas – and we are trying to show those in our music.” "
    $12.00
  • Here's a nice archival discovery courtesy of Esoteric Recordings.  Fields was the post-Rare Bird trio consisting of keyboardist Graham Field, ex-King Crimson drummer Andy McCullough, and bassist Alan Barry.  Their 1971 eponymous release on CBS is a prog rock gem in which Field shows off his abilities as an organ player.Contrasts is a previously unknown to exist second album that sat on a shelf gathering dust since 1972.  It finds Alan Barry replaced by ex-Supertramp Frank Farrell on bass and vocals.  Field concentrates on organ but he does play some synthesizer.  The music has a melodic feel that reminds a little bit of Spring.  Comes with plenty of liner notes by Sid Smith.
    $16.00
  • "This album was recorded soon after the band's legendary concert on the steps of the Reichstag in Berlin in 1980 and includes the emotive 'In Memory Of The Martyrs' and the hit 'Life Is For Living'.This reissue has been newly remastered from the original master tapes, includes two bonus tracks and features a booklet that fully restores all original album artwork with a new essay by BJH experts Keith and Monika Domone."
    $17.00
  • Archival release on Long Hair Music of a German prog duo that never recorded a proper album.  Interesting that the lineup consisted solely of organ and drums.  Gunter Kuhlwein takes a Brian Auger meets Keith Emerson approach to his playing and drummer Walter Helbig has a bit of a jazz leaning.  Kuhlwein sings a bit as well but this is mostly instrumental.  If you are fan of early ELP, The Nice, Hardin & York, or even a very obscure German band called Sixty-Nine (anyone remember Circle Of The Crayfish?) you need to check these two kats out.  They rip it up!
    $18.00
  • White Willow's third album receives new treatment from Jacob Holm Lupo's Termo Records.  This remastered edition comes with new artwork and liner notes as well as 3 previously unreleased bonus tracks.White Willow is one of the most significant progressive groups of the current eraThe Billboard Guide To Progressive MusicWhite Willows third album "Sacrament" is a mystical blend of gothic atmospheres and intricate, classically influenced progressive music. Having firmly established themselves around the world as one of the premier progressive ensembles, "Sacrament" is one of 2000s most anticipated progressive rock releases.The Norwegian bands 1995 debut "Ignis Fatuus" is enshrined in the Top 100 releases of Billboards Guide To Progressive Music. This album launched the band into the world spotlight culminating in a highly acclaimed performance at Progfest 95 in Los Angeles. The 1998 follow up "Ex Tenebris" brought further attention to the group with its mystical blend of gothic, folk, and classical music within a progressive rock framework."Sacrament" shows the maturity of the band. Perhaps a bit heavier than before but with all their trademark ingredients in place, White Willow will easily once again capture the attention of progressive rock fans around the world. Imagine a blend of The Gathering, King Crimson, and vintage Jethro Tull and you have just scratched the surface of the intense sounds this band creates. Soaring female vocals, mondo-Crimsonoid guitar leads, and blistering flute work set against a backdrop of symphonic rock keyboards will effortless ignite the imagination of the dedicated progressive music listener.Also of note is the stunningly transparent and three dimensional audiophile sound.
    $16.00
  • The band's last album was really a forgettable effort best saved for completists. The label forced them to sing in German and the music took a decidedly commercial twist. It was a sad end for a great band. Remastered edition with four demo bonus tracks.
    $14.00
  • "The live recording was taken from their critically acclaimed performance at RoSfest USA at the beautiful Majestic Theatre in Gettysburg. Following the success of their award winning second studio album 'Moments', IOEarth present their first live album to the world, showcasing 11 tracks from their ground breaking albums including the sublime 'Cinta Indah' , the explosive 'Home' and the dynamic 'Harmonix'. "
    $7.00
  • Third album from this intense Danish trio is only available on vinyl.  Papir create heavy psychedelic jams that evoke the feel of early German bands like Ash Ra Tempel and Guru Guru.  The album was produced by Causa Sui mainman Jonas Munk who totally catches the vibe.  Crazed wah-wah laced solos that will blast you into the cosmos!  I'm getting high just writing about it!!!  This one kills and it kills and it doesn't stop killing from beginning to end."Papir is an instrumental trio from Copenhagen, Denmark. They’ve created their own unique type of semi-improvised psychedelic rock by mixing together new and old, heavyness and atmosphere, freedom and power. By now they have become masters of their craft, and this, their third album, earns them a spot in the absolute elite of the current European psychedelic rock scene. Everyone who has been lucky enough to catch the band live know what an reverence-inducing experience their energitic, adventurous explorations can be. Papir are the perfect antidote to the fashionable trends that continues to dominate the present, but they don’t go beyond the limited to scope of the dominating indie-rock by merely reaching back to the bygone golden era of pyschedelic rock and electric jazz like so many others do – they transcend it. Their music sounds vital and fresh.When Mojo writer Kieron Tyler visited Denmark’s renowned SPOT Festival in the summer of 2012 he was blown away by Papir’s performance as an experience that clearly stood out compared to the rest of the bill (that included all of Scnadinavias leading acts): It takes a lot to stand out at SPOT…but Copenhagen’s Papir are arresting. Their guitar, bass and drums mesh powerfully in an intense, jazz-inflected instrumental rock. Voyaging through post-rock Tortoise terrain, it nods towards Hawkwind’s freak outs and employs liberal dollops of wah-wah pedal. The pieces – not songs – twist and turn like Dark Star Grateful Dead. From these jumping off points, Papir scurry off on their own path." 
    $23.00