Akasha (Vinyl)

SKU: BWR154
Label:
Black Widow Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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This was always a weird but charming album.  Recorded on a low rent budget in 1977, Akasha made this one and done album.  The album kicks off with a lengthy track loaded with 'tron.  The rest of the album is full on prog rock with lots of wacked out twists and turns.  It literally was recorded in the bomb shelter in the basement of a hotel so it has a real primitive sound but the music does shine through.

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  • 220 minute NTSC Region 0 DVD. The material kicks off with the lengthy Follow My Dream suite recorded in Belgium in 1978. This is followed by various live clips including footage as far back as 1974 as well as a complete show from 1994. There are other bonus videos and interviews featured as well. When this band was firing on all cylinders they were an intense prog outfit. Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • Legit reissue (on Long Hair Music) of the first album from this essential German band.  The lineup and overall sound was quite different from the two more familiar albums "Time Machine" and "Electric Silence".  Guitarist Harry Kramer didn't have quite the frenetic virtuosity of Eddy Marron but he does the job more than ably.  The band featured a vocalist, Jochen Leuschner, who had a real beautiful and soulful voice.  Inclusion of sax gives the music a jazz rock feel with more of an emphasis on the rock side.  I'm actually reminded a little bit of Chicago Transit Authority.  Quite a beautiful album and highly recommended.
    $27.00
  • "40th anniversary first official reissue of 1973 Icelandic hard rock underground monster that's been the target of collectors for at least two decades! Carefully remastered for pristine sound that lays waste to all the bootlegs that have come before. 12-page booklet with liner notes, clippings and photographs. After several years of trying to make this happen, we are very happy to finally be able to bring you the first official reissue of this legendary gem.Icecross possess a unique and dark sound for their time which reveals influences ranging from Sabbath to Crimson to Blue Oyster Cult and beyond all melded together in such a way to form their distinct Icecross style. Considered proto-metal by many, though they don’t achieve this with a typical smash your face approach. Instead, Icecross unleash some killer inventive guitar sounds by way of Leslie speakers combined with wild ominous bass lines, frantic drumming, spooky effected vocals and splendid use of bow to create a perfect dark heavy guitar album. One of the few, if not the only, Icelandic band inspired by Sabbath at that time.For fans of Leaf Hound, Blue Cheer, Elias Hulk, Iron Claw, Jerusalem, Necronomicon, Hairy Chapter, Incredible Hog, Dust, Pentagram, Flower Travellin' Band and the like."
    $24.00
  • The band's fifth album was a brilliant amalgam of Beatles influenced pop and classically influenced progressive rock. I still get a rise out of hearing "Fire On High". This remastered edition comes with five bonus tracks which are a bit dispensible alternate mixes.
    $5.00
  • World Is Round and Yesterday Is A Friend jewel box editions bundled together in a slipcase and a very nice price.
    $16.00
  • New album from Roine Stolt kicks off with a 20 minute track and keeps on running from there. Daniel Gildenlow (Pain Of Salvation) has been touring with the band and is featured on the album as well as a special guest. That can't be a bad thing.
    $14.00
  • "As a historical document, this release takes some beating. Recorded during the short – and only – tour that Fripp & Eno undertook as a duo, it captures a pivotal moment, not only in the development of both players, but in the live music experience itself. Here was a "rock concert" (or "superstar show" as the poster for the less glamourous Tunbridge Wells gig had it) where two of the leading lights of the art prog scene sat in near darkness improvising a series of dronic, ectoplasmic mood pieces for an hour and a half. No hits, no big riffs, no exotic costumes. In 2014, that description could be analogous to any number of live electronica events, but in 1975, it led to booing, walkouts and open hostility.Yes, there had been precedents for this type of proto-ambient music before, specifically the kosmische of Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze, and most pertinently, the systems music of Terry Riley, which had inspired Eno to start experimenting with tape loops in the first place. And it wasn't as if the duo hadn't already signalled their musical intentions with the release of (No Pussyfooting) in 1973. But in a pre-online world, music travelled more slowly, and a lot of people went to these shows expecting Roxy Music and King Crimson numbers. What they got instead, was an intriguing, and for some discomfiting, glimpse into the future.1975 was a liminal year for rock music in the UK. It saw the end of glam, the fading of prog and the first stirrings of punk. It also saw the biggest band of the day release one of the bleakest, most alienated albums in the rock canon, Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here. While operating much further along the spectrum than Floyd, there's a similarly immersive, almost enervating feel to the sounds that Fripp & Eno produce during this performance, suggesting that we're at the start of a new way of listening to and experiencing music, an opening up of new possibilities in aural pleasure. With its use of repetition and egoless explorations of sonic space, there's also a strong argument for Fripp & Eno creating the UK's only indigenous strain of krautrock.The performance begins before Fripp & Eno have even arrived on stage, with the cold, aqueous drone of 'Water On Water'. Quizzical voices can be heard in the audience, then cheers, but these soon subside as a tide of alien soundwaves continues to wash over them. As a listening experience, it goes beyond the point of nothing happening into a new realm of uncertainty, and the audience sound as much relieved as delighted when Fripp & Eno finally take their places and begin playing 'A Radical Representative Of Pinsnip' (a version of 'The Heavenly Music Corporation'). Fripp's guitar seems to intuitively tune into the wavelength that Eno is broadcasting on, a huge, ever-growing pulsating brain weaving tessellations of holy noise around the fabric of the drone. Over a pattern of discordant notes, like an evil fairground pipe organ, Fripp solos at his most atonal and nightmarish, before calmly sliding into 'Swastika Girls'. Eno's backing loop seems to mutate from the ringing of wind chimes to the squealing of pigs, while Fripp's unmistakeable shredding alternates from placid to fiercely angular. 'Wind On Wind' signals an intermission – there's no crowd noise (other than the sound of someone choking on a magic cigarette), so it's difficult to say whether the audience remains rapt with attention or have already departed en masse to the bar.The performance re-starts with 'Wind On Water', its gentle beginning leading gradually to an ecstatic ascension, Fripp's guitar like dazzlingly bright reflections of the sun on a rippled pool. We then get a series of anagrammatically-punning tracks unfeatured on any of the duo's studio albums. 'A Near Find In Rip Pop' is based on a simple loop of strummed guitar, which Fripp drops note clusters over, before peeling away to reveal (un)natural sounds of wind and distant animal cries. It's a point of mellowness midway through proceedings, soon disrupted by 'A Fearful Proper Din', its grinding chug like Sunn O))) heard at the end of a long tunnel. Fripp's soloing taps into the heaviness of Red-era King Crimson, faster, harder and more threatening than before as the track morphs into 'A Darn Psi Inferno'. Children's voices appear against the metallic breathing of Fripp's guitar at its scariest, the tension finally broken by the relative balm of 'Evening Star'.Fripp & Eno exit for a second time to 'An Iron Frappe' – another unaccompanied drone piece resembling the infinite echo of a struck bell – before returning to encore with 'Softy Gun Poison'. Here, the duo finally drift off into deep space in a trail of sinister voices and unhinged laughter, the whine and growl of their engines stretched and refracted, the ghost of a slow-motion explosion. The track culminates in perhaps the single most transcendent part of the show/recording, a warm plateau of dense drone that segues into the walk-off tape of 'An Index Of Metals', their ship caught on the lip of a black hole for all eternity, faintly transmitting back to earth.Over the entire length of this immaculately restored 3-CD set (which includes a disc of the unadorned tape loops that Eno prepared for these shows), I began to wonder if anybody needed this much Fripp & Eno in their lives – that such thoughts now feel positively iconoclastic compared with the righteous indignation that many people greeted this material with in 1975 shows just how far we've come, and how much Fripp & Eno (both as a duo and individually) helped to redefine our appreciation of what music could be." - The Quietus
    $23.00
  • "German heavy metal marauders Scorpions recorded seven studio records before breaking in to the U.S. market in 1982 with Blackout. The album became the group's first platinum disc in the U.S., and the dynamic single "No One Like You" became a staple of album rock radio. While the Scorpions had created powerful anthems and epic rockers in the past, Blackout mixed the ingredients just right. The title track was an endorphin rush of fast-riffing guitars and electrified, high-pitched vocals that culminated with the sound of shattering glass. "Can't Live Without You" was a powerful melange of flash, firepower, and pure melody, and the slow, surging "China White" sounded like a psychedelic interpretation of Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir." After years of ignored visas, Scorpions had finally arrived in America."  -- Jon Wiederhorn
    $5.00
  • Second album from this overlooked band. Os Mundi was considered the first rock band from Berlin with lots of members moving in and out of the band. 43 Minuten marked a departure from their debut "A Latin Mass", finding the band with a stronger jazz rock element in their sound but still retaining the underground feel and sound courtesy of producer Conny Planck. Vocals move in and out of the mix but stay clear long enough for the jammed out guitar and flute breaks. The band gets into a groove and then blasts off. Perhaps a bit reminiscent of Out Of Focus.  Limited edition gatefold vinyl pressed by Music On Vinyl.
    $36.00
  • Well Steve is done resucitating the Genesis catalogue and back to concentrating on fresh solo material.  The new album Wolflight is a bit of a loose concept album and I find it to be one of his strongest releases in years.  The album is filled with lots of guests (including Chris Squire) contributing exotic instruments to the mix adding an old world sound.  Steve's trademark sound is locked into place so if you are looking for the wailing guitar, liquid runs and acoustic delicacy you won't be disappointed.  His vocals has never been my favorite part of a Steve Hackett album but either I've mellowed in age or his voice has - not sure which.  Regardless it fits the music just fine.  Classic Hackett and nothing less.  BUY OR DIE!Please note this is the US edition that arrives in a digipak.  Its a 2 disc set.  Disc 1 is the standard CD.  Disc 2 is actually a Blu-ray.  Tontent includes hi-res stereo and 5.1 mix of the album, 2 bonus tracks not on the standard CD (in hi-res no less!), and extensive interview footage with Steve Hackett.
    $14.00
  • "The Hawklords release their brand new studio album, 'Dream' on 30th September 2013.Originally formed by Robert Calvert and Dave Brock (of Hawkwind) from the ashes of The Sonic Assassins in 1978, Hawklords features key former Hawkwind band members Harvey Bainbridge (synths & vocals), Jerry Richards (guitar & vocals), Adrian Shaw (bass & vocals) and Ron Tree (lead vocalist & FX). Dave Pearce (drums), sticksman from UK psyche-rock band The Bevis Frond, completes the band line-up."
    $13.00
  • King Crimson has performed, recorded & released material in its own inimitable manner for the past 46 years. As the band enters its 47th year of operation in 2015, the occasion is marked with the first release culled from the band’s Autumn 2014 US tour. Comprised of 41 minutes of material by the newest incarnation of the band fronted by the line-up’s formidable three drummer setup, Live At The Orpheum has been mixed from 24bit multi-track performances recorded at the band’s two concerts at the Los Angeles venue. Featuring a mixture of new & old King Crimson material – some being performed live for the first time – the album makes an ideal recorded debut for the septet.For those who travelled from all over the world to see the US shows, it’s an opportunity to relive the power, precision & sheer musicality of the concerts. For those who couldn’t attend but wanted to, it’s an opportunity to hear why the concerts generated such excitement.For any fan of the band, recent or long-term, it’s an essential purchase. With further concerts being planned for 2015, Live At The Orpheum is the perfect start for a new year of King Crimson music.Track listing:CD (16/44.1 stereo), DVD-A (24/96 Hi-Res stereo)1 Walk On: Monk Morph Chamber Music2 One More Red Nightmare3 Banshee Legs Bell Hassle4 The ConstruKction of Light5 The Letters6 Sailor’s Tale7 StarlessGavin Harrison - Pat Mastelotto – Bill Rieflin - Mel Collins - Robert Fripp - Jakko Jakszyk - Tony LevinRecorded Sept. 30th, October 1st at The Orpheum Theatre, Los AngelesFront Line: Mixed & Engineered by Gavin HarrisonBack Line: Mixed by Jakko Jakszyk & Robert FrippProduction Engineer: Jakko JakszykLive Recording Engineer: Mark Vreeken
    $17.00
  • "With contemporary music often looking to dissolve artificial boundaries and cross-pollinate with abandon, it shouldn't comes as a surprise to hear progressive rock groups using the same tack. On one hand, expectations often drive them to stay close to home— Yes may release new music periodically, but its live shows draw more from the classic 1970-1977 repertoire than any other. Then there's King Crimson who, while looking back to some extent, are more interested in pushing forward and creating live sets reflective of that aesthetic. New groups aren't anchored down with the dilemma of evolving while, at the same time, pleasing longtime fans interested in hearing their favorite songs. Mahogany Frog suggests, perhaps, one possible future of progressive rock, bringing together elements of electronica, ambient, industrial and jazz into the more familiar terrain of detailed, long-form writing, odd meters and neoclassicism. DO5 demonstrates what might happen if Radiohead and Sigur Rós were put into a blender with Pink Floyd, Yes and Genesis, then dropping the vocals. The end result sounds like none of them, though markers run throughout DO5—Mahogany Frog's fifth album, but its first for a label with widespread distribution. "G.M.F.T.P.O." opens the nine-song, 45-minute disc with a high energy, guitar-driven anthemic melody, propelled by drummer J.P. Perron's visceral beat and Scott Ellenberger's thundering bass. But a mere thirty seconds into its brief ninety-second duration, it enters space-rock territory, with electronics entering the picture as a series of punctuating shots segue into the eleven-minute "T-Tigers & Toasters." Ambient sounds from a variety of analog and digital keyboards, played by Graham Epp and Jesse Warkentin, build into a deceptively unsophisticated three-chord change that morphs into alt-rock as they pick up guitars for a high volume, heavily distorted power-chord theme. The simplicity turns complex, however, during the second half as odd meters and unexpected twists and turns are introduced, along with sudden dynamic shifts from ear-splitting to a near-whisper. One thing is certain, however: Mahogany Frog is a band best experienced with the volume control turned up to eleven. It only helps to make the quieter passages even more dramatic and the symphonic tinges of "Last Stand at Fisher Farm," with Epps and Ellenberger picking up trumpets for its potent theme, all the stronger. Mahogany Frog isn't a group that relies on solos to impress, but Perron nevertheless stands out, his playing on the knotty "You're Meshugah!" especially frenetic and captivating. The brief, riff-driven "I Am Not Your Sugar" may be a head-banger's delight, but it's one that expects the metal-head to pump his fist while searching desperately for the "one." Accusations of bombast tend to follow progressive rockers around, and there's no shortage of turgidity to be found on DO5. Still, it's a guilty pleasure that fans of the alt-rock scene, looking for something more challenging, may well gravitate towards. For longstanding progressive rockers who believe in emphasis on progressive, Mahogany Frog hits all the right reference points, yet is as contemporary as it gets, breathing new life into what is mistakenly considered by some to be an outdated genre. They couldn't be more wrong." - All About Jazz
    $8.00