Akasha (Vinyl)

SKU: BWR154
Label:
Black Widow Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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This was always a weird but charming album.  Recorded on a low rent budget in 1977, Akasha made this one and done album.  The album kicks off with a lengthy track loaded with 'tron.  The rest of the album is full on prog rock with lots of wacked out twists and turns.  It literally was recorded in the bomb shelter in the basement of a hotel so it has a real primitive sound but the music does shine through.

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  • World Is Round and Yesterday Is A Friend jewel box editions bundled together in a slipcase and a very nice price.
    $16.00
  • US prog band's classic third album remastered. Comes with two bonus tracks - demos of "Child Of Innocence" and "It's You".
    $5.00
  • “Tempo”, long waited new Osanna release with a 40 pages book with lots of photos and 2 DVD. Prog lovers will be captured by this work full of great music with a recent concert at Trianon Theatre in Naples with orchestra and archives material with rare 70s video footage.The book shows many pictures which tell Osanna Story with some photos from the 1st Osanna line up (Elio D’Anna, Danilo Rustici, Massimo Guarino, Lello Brandi) and a biography of the band written in Italian and English. The 2 DVD tell the history of the band from the first RAI video clips ‘til the recent live plays in Naples in 2012.First DVD “Live in Naples” has realised at the Trianon Theatre in Naples on 24 October 2012 during the presentation of  “Rosso Rock” album; a concert with some guests as: David Jackson, Sophya Baccini, Maurizio Capone, Elio Eco, Giampiero Ingrassia, Gianni Leone, Antonella Morea, Tito Schipa Jr., la Banda “Concerto Musicale Speranza” di Pino Ciccarelli e l’Orchestra d’archi “Rosso Rock” Ensemble” diretta da Gianluca Falasca.First half is more “electric” and Osanna plays with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini songs as: “‘A Zingara”, “Introduzione da YS” del Balletto di Bronzo, “Everybody’s gonna see you die”, In un vecchio cieco”, “Vado verso una meta” and “Theme One” (VDGG) to close first half of the gig.The second half start with a tribute to “Milano Calibro 9” movie directed by Fernando Di Leo, with the suite from the album “Preludio Tema Variazioni e Canzona” realised in 1972 with Luis Bacalov; Osanna plays with the “Rosso Rock Ensemble” Orchestra directed by Gianluca Falasca.Following some guests play with Osanna: Giampiero Ingrassia in “There will be time”, Tito Schipa Jr. “Per la Strada” (“Orfeo 9”) and “Fiume” (Landscape of Life), Antonella More, Maurizio Capone and Elio Eco in the final part of gig in “O Cuore e Napule” and “Fuje a chistu paese”.Second DVD “Story” : 20 video clip represent the story of the Band, some are from RAI Archives and there are also videos from Capodistria and some come from private archives. From 1971 to 2009 20 videos show different Osanna line up from time of RAI and TeleCapodistria ‘til recent videos in Naples and Savona. Many different “L’Uomo” versions presented by Renzo Arbore, Enrico Simonetti, Nino Fuscagni, Vanna Brosio and clips taken from “Speciale Tre Milioni”, “Domenica In”, “Amico Flauto”, “Adesso Musica”, “Tutto è Pop” etc.A really exclusive video is the one showing a Pop Festival in Naples “Be-In” (1973) where you can see some “prog” stars on stage...11 videos are taken from the 70s and 9 videos regarding Osanna from 2000 to 2009 including live at Mediterraneo Theatre in Naples in 2001 and live at Chiabrera Theatre in Savona in 2009 with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini.
    $33.00
  • "With contemporary music often looking to dissolve artificial boundaries and cross-pollinate with abandon, it shouldn't comes as a surprise to hear progressive rock groups using the same tack. On one hand, expectations often drive them to stay close to home— Yes may release new music periodically, but its live shows draw more from the classic 1970-1977 repertoire than any other. Then there's King Crimson who, while looking back to some extent, are more interested in pushing forward and creating live sets reflective of that aesthetic. New groups aren't anchored down with the dilemma of evolving while, at the same time, pleasing longtime fans interested in hearing their favorite songs. Mahogany Frog suggests, perhaps, one possible future of progressive rock, bringing together elements of electronica, ambient, industrial and jazz into the more familiar terrain of detailed, long-form writing, odd meters and neoclassicism. DO5 demonstrates what might happen if Radiohead and Sigur Rós were put into a blender with Pink Floyd, Yes and Genesis, then dropping the vocals. The end result sounds like none of them, though markers run throughout DO5—Mahogany Frog's fifth album, but its first for a label with widespread distribution. "G.M.F.T.P.O." opens the nine-song, 45-minute disc with a high energy, guitar-driven anthemic melody, propelled by drummer J.P. Perron's visceral beat and Scott Ellenberger's thundering bass. But a mere thirty seconds into its brief ninety-second duration, it enters space-rock territory, with electronics entering the picture as a series of punctuating shots segue into the eleven-minute "T-Tigers & Toasters." Ambient sounds from a variety of analog and digital keyboards, played by Graham Epp and Jesse Warkentin, build into a deceptively unsophisticated three-chord change that morphs into alt-rock as they pick up guitars for a high volume, heavily distorted power-chord theme. The simplicity turns complex, however, during the second half as odd meters and unexpected twists and turns are introduced, along with sudden dynamic shifts from ear-splitting to a near-whisper. One thing is certain, however: Mahogany Frog is a band best experienced with the volume control turned up to eleven. It only helps to make the quieter passages even more dramatic and the symphonic tinges of "Last Stand at Fisher Farm," with Epps and Ellenberger picking up trumpets for its potent theme, all the stronger. Mahogany Frog isn't a group that relies on solos to impress, but Perron nevertheless stands out, his playing on the knotty "You're Meshugah!" especially frenetic and captivating. The brief, riff-driven "I Am Not Your Sugar" may be a head-banger's delight, but it's one that expects the metal-head to pump his fist while searching desperately for the "one." Accusations of bombast tend to follow progressive rockers around, and there's no shortage of turgidity to be found on DO5. Still, it's a guilty pleasure that fans of the alt-rock scene, looking for something more challenging, may well gravitate towards. For longstanding progressive rockers who believe in emphasis on progressive, Mahogany Frog hits all the right reference points, yet is as contemporary as it gets, breathing new life into what is mistakenly considered by some to be an outdated genre. They couldn't be more wrong." - All About Jazz
    $8.00
  • "Transformation is a very apt title for Canadian Prog veterans FM, for not only has their music transformed numerous times over the years, so has their line-up. Joining bassist/keyboard player Cameron Hawkins this time round is drummer Paul DeLong (Roger Hodgson/Kim Mitchell), violinist/mandolin player Edward Bernard, who has performed with Druckfarben and violinist (yes, there are two violinists here) Aaron Solomon. The recording group being completed by legendary Rush, Dream Theater, Fates Warning producer/engineer Terry Brown, who does an excellent job.So you'll gather then that the first proper FM album since 1987's Tonight still follows in its predecessors footsteps of placing violin front and centre. Yet while that may sound risky in today's often sanitised Prog world, Transformation sounds remarkably contemporary and, at the same time, true to this band's 70s roots. More beautiful than punchy, in places the songs on this album feel like Yes with copious amounts of violin strung over it, the air being light, melodic and captivating. DeLong is stunning throughout, his rare ability to be ridiculously busy and intricate, underpinned by a solidity which fixes everything in place. Nary a second goes by where the percussionist isn't whispering a ghost beat, paradiddling the toms to within an inch of their lives, or alternating between snare, hi-hat and cymbals at break neck speed. However, amazingly, he never interrupts the beautiful flow of the vocals provided by Hawkins, Solomon and Bernard; the trio causing another reason for celebration in the process. However no album was built on drums and voice alone, so the stunning, varied violin, viola and mandolin work which weaves and dances across Hawkins deep resonant bass and darting, lilting, pointed synth contributions, are as impressive as they are vital to the unbridled success of this album.There's a real depth of sound and arrangement across the nine tracks on show, the likes of "Tour Of Duty" a journey from fragile art through fractured beauty, into controlled frenzy. "The Love Bomb (Universal Love)" and "Brave New Worlds" contrast this approach excellently, a sparse framework thriving on roaming bass, while gentle string stabs allow the vocals to express the emotions of melancholic introspection, but overriding hope and belief displayed in every one of the songs on this album. And it's that uplifting feeling which really infuses Transformation with the power to captivate and control your attention from start to finish, whether through the harsher attack of the bristling "Re-Boot, Reawaken", unsettling pulse of "Children Of Eve", the almost jauntily optimistic "Safe And Sound" or idyllic "Heaven On Earth".Often when a band reappears from the past, as if by magic to reclaim their past glories, the results are safe and deflating. Transformation however falls far from that trap, instead announcing itself with a triumphant confidence which never fades once as its beauties unfold, and vitally it just gets better with each and every luscious visit to the land of hope and understanding it creates." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $17.00
  • After their last performance at Nearfest Apocalypse, Anglagard's lineup went through a bit of an upheaval.  Luckily it didn't materially affect the band's sound.  Anglagard is still Anglagard.  Prog Pa Svenska is a 2CD set that documents the band's three day residence at Club Citta in Tokyo, Japan back in March 2013.  Material is drawn from all three studio albums.  The recording is beautiful and the performances are stellar.  What else do you need to know?  How about this review:"May 14th of this year will see the release of a new Änglagård live album: Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan. Some of you may have been lucky enough to have been following Änglagård from the very beginning, but if you’re anything like me, you came into the game when Änglagård’s small catalog of music was either out of print or near impossible to find without spending a fortune; that is, with the exception of one little disc which somehow was available when snagging a copy of albums like Epilogue seemed to be a Herculean feat. That album was Buried Alive, the live recording of Änglagård’s last show prior to their 1994 breakup. While the liner-notes of Buried Alive reveal a band that was not 100% satisfied, 20 years later with the release of Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan, Änglagård is back and going strong with a new live recording that is rich in dynamic and deep in maturity, a performance that I am confident that they are proud to immortalize for their fans.Prog på Svenska represents the first of three consecutive nights that the masters of dark Swedish prog delivered at Club Città in Japan alongside The Crimson ProjeKCt (featuring the legendary Adrian Belew and Tony Levin). For me personally this is a special album that transports me back to when I witnessed their unbelievable performance only three weeks later at Baja Prog. Among a plethora of canonized acts at the festival (such as Hackett, New Trolls, and Three Friends), Änglagård’s remarkable performance showed that they stand in no one’s shadow. While there’s nothing like being there in person, Prog på Svenska is about as good a live recording and performance as I’ve ever heard on disc. I certainly am jealous of the Japanese fans who got to see them three nights in a row last year.The live-set on this album shows a balanced representation of the old and the new, featuring two tracks from each studio release along with an unreleased intro track which I assume (and hope) will be on Änglagård’s next studio production. So that the anticipation doesn’t kill anyone, I’ll start right off with the new song: ”Introvertus Fugu Part 1.” Perhaps the first thing to know about this track is that it’s our first look into the composition of the new band featuring Linus Kåse and Erik Hammarström alongside Anna, Johan, and Tord. I can happily say that “Introvertus” shows a band that knows how to move forward without abandoning the distinctive identity that they are known for, a fact that strongly hints at a powerful album to come in the future. The opening moments of the song show the band increasingly incorporating elements of modern classical and atonal music through the delicately dark chord changes on the piano before constructing a wave of tension with ambient bass noise, a distinctive guitar motif,  and a descending melody on flute playing against tuned percussion. As the ambient textures continue to swell, a big percussive crash shockingly interjects, setting the stage for an ominous swelling of Mellotron chords, resulting in an eerily delightful sound. The intensity continues to build with a drum roll on snare and cymbals that transition the piece into an aggressive angular instrumental attack featuring howling Minimoog modulation; enter a fiercely dark melody which is doubled or harmonized on most instruments before the band takes the listener into their signature dose of woodsy folkiness. Johan and Linus continue pounding in the rhythm section before the eerie central motif returns to bring “Introvertus” towards its close with the full force of Anna and Linus’ dueling woodwinds, one hanging on the melody while the other produces chaotic squeals before withering off the melody in a very unsettling (but cool) way.After kicking it off with an exciting intro the band takes us back 20 years with “Hostsejd.” The rich dynamics, especially the meticulously controlled Mellotron swells, really shine on this one while some small differences in instrumentation (such as the sax on the first main melody instead of flute) really keep the piece fresh and exciting. Although I was craving the intro on the follow up track, “Längtans Klocka,” the supreme level of interplay between all instruments that starts off the piece is fantastic. Furthermore, the guitar/Mellotron duet at about 6:30 that leads into a memorable theme is quite the highlight. Finally, the circus-y melody towards the end of the song somehow becomes even more diabolic in this slightly stripped down version as Tord’s demented waltzy riff serves as a perfect backdrop for the drunken saxes. Speaking of Tord, it certainly is nice to see him back in the band, and I must add that his guitar playing and sense of emotion is perfect for the band and has improved over the years. This is perhaps most clearly demonstrated on “Jordrök,” a quintessential song in Änglagård’s catalog. The reality of the matter is that despite the fact that the band was quite mature at the time of Hybris‘ release, their capacity to bring out all the nuances in pieces like this shows that they are musicians who have truly refined their craft over the years. “Jordrök” sounds more alive than ever; the Mellotron flute section in the middle, one of the band’s absolute trademark melodies, is to die for, and Linus’ superb use of phrasing and pacing in the piano intro certainly takes this classic piece up several notches.Moving deeper into the performance we see “Sorgmantel,” one of my personal favorites from Viljans Öga. The first thing I noticed about this particular performance is that the intro sounds much more raw due to differences in instrumentation, this version starting out with a guitar and bass call and response. While I absolutely adore the studio version, this new arrangement and performance was also wonderful and brought its own set of advantages to the table. First, the bass/guitar duet at the beginning really exposes the melody and shows you that its not just about fancy instrumentation, it’s a gorgeous melody through and through. Second, the band is not concerned in the least bit with rushing through the performance of this piece; the pacing is delicate, precise, and emotional with plenty of space for ritard and sway as the intro melody gets passed around from guitar to bass and flute and is then countered by the piano, making the fugue-nature of this piece even more evident. The playing is incredibly tight but busting with dynamic throughout as “Sorgmantel” takes its many twists and turns before working its way to a quiet ending; graceful… even breathtaking.To wrap up the night, Änglagård once again goes back to the early 90′s, this time with “Kung Bore” and “Sista Somrar.” Although the former leans more on the folky side of the band, as does much of their first album, the highlight of the piece actually ended up being the mysterious and ambient middle section where the band shows that they have mastered perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of music: playing quietly with vibrant emotion. Between the light swells of guitar, weird effects on bass, a steady organ pattern in the upper register, and a lightly beating drum, this section goes beyond merely doing justice to the original. Finally, the depth and emotion of “Sista Somrar’s” slow, dark intro is, quite frankly, deadly, and goes miles deeper than the original studio recording (which was in and of itself very impressive) as an ominous sax melody flanked by stormy percussion and effects guides us to the unleashing of an uncanny tron female solo voice that will haunt your nightmares for weeks to come.In my opinion, Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan is an essential live album that you don’t want to miss out on. Quite honestly, I am a person who rarely enjoys live albums because oftentimes the performances and production are either significantly worse than the studio recording, or the live version ends up being stripped down to the point where there’s just something missing, or the band simply doesn’t offer an experience which is significant enough to enjoy the live version deeply; in most cases you sort of ‘had to have been there’ to get what’s so great about it. Such is not the case with Änglagård’s latest live documentation. From the performances to the production and the differences in detail from the originals, Prog på Svenska is a stellar capturing of live art through and through. And of course, I might add that if you ever get the chance to see Änglagård perform, take the opportunity; if your significant other isn’t a prog fan, take them anyways. Änglagård’s extreme level of delicacy in phrasing and dynamic is a tough match to beat in progressive music and should hold up even in the face of the snootiest of music connoisseurs." - Progulator
    $25.00
  • New edition taken from the original tapes comes with a real suprise bonus. In addition to the regular version of the album the CD contains a previously never heard before mix done by Geoff Emerick. It is actually the original mix but the band/label decided to add more keys, choirs and effects. As much as I love Remember The Future, this is THE Nektar album for me. Not sure if it's Larry Fast's synth work but something about Recycled makes it the most solid of their albums. One of my all time favs...
    $15.00
  • Legit reissue (on Long Hair Music) of the first album from this essential German band.  The lineup and overall sound was quite different from the two more familiar albums "Time Machine" and "Electric Silence".  Guitarist Harry Kramer didn't have quite the frenetic virtuosity of Eddy Marron but he does the job more than ably.  The band featured a vocalist, Jochen Leuschner, who had a real beautiful and soulful voice.  Inclusion of sax gives the music a jazz rock feel with more of an emphasis on the rock side.  I'm actually reminded a little bit of Chicago Transit Authority.  Quite a beautiful album and highly recommended.
    $27.00
  • Fifth album from the Polish prog band led by former Collage guitarist Mirek Gil.  The band clearly goes for a contemporary sound.  There are overt similarities to Riverside but the music has a more symphonic rock side.  I've always enjoyed Gil's guitar tone.  He plays with quite an expressive style.  In this case its nicely augmented by violin and keys.  Lots of prog coming from Poland.  Believe is one of the better bands to emerge from that scene.
    $15.00
  • Long awaited 5.1 remix of the classic Rush album in a limited  "super deluxe" edition comes housed in a hardbound book.  Here is what you get...CD:1. Remastered edition2. 3 previously unreleased live tracksBLU-RAY:1 5.1 remix in 24/96 PCM and DTS-HD2. Stereo mix in 24/96 PCMEXTRAS:40 page comic book by story artist Tom Hodges (Star Wars "The Clone Wars," The Simpson's "Treehouse of Horrors #17") and a 24 page book with expanded artwork, liner notes, lyrics and unreleased photos. New liner notes written by David Fricke, Rolling Stone.
    $69.00
  • "German heavy metal marauders Scorpions recorded seven studio records before breaking in to the U.S. market in 1982 with Blackout. The album became the group's first platinum disc in the U.S., and the dynamic single "No One Like You" became a staple of album rock radio. While the Scorpions had created powerful anthems and epic rockers in the past, Blackout mixed the ingredients just right. The title track was an endorphin rush of fast-riffing guitars and electrified, high-pitched vocals that culminated with the sound of shattering glass. "Can't Live Without You" was a powerful melange of flash, firepower, and pure melody, and the slow, surging "China White" sounded like a psychedelic interpretation of Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir." After years of ignored visas, Scorpions had finally arrived in America."  -- Jon Wiederhorn
    $5.00
  • This is the CD/Blu-Ray version of Steven Wilson's remix of the 1974 classic.  Track listing is as follows:CD - 2014 Steven Wilson Stereo Mix:1. Proclamation (6:48)2. So Sincere (3:52)3. Aspirations (4:41)4. Playing the Game (6:46)5. Cogs in Cogs (3:08)6. No God's a Man (4:28)7. The Face (4:12)8. Valedictory (3:21)Bonus Tracks:9. The Power And The Glory10. AspirationsBlu-Ray (NTSC, Region 0):Mixed by Steven WilsonAlbum with VideosAudio Formats:96/24 Stereo LPCMDTS 5.1 Master AudioProclamationSo SincereAspirationsPlaying the GameCogs in CogsNo God's a ManThe FaceValedictoryBonus Track:The Power and the GloryInstrumentals -Album with screen saverAudio Format:96/24 Stereo LPCMProclamationSo SincereAspirationsPlaying the GameCogs in CogsNo God's a ManThe FaceValedictoryBonus Tracks:The Power and the GloryAspirations (out-take)Extra:Original 1974 Studio MixTransferred Flat - 96/24 LPCMProclamationSo SincereAspirationsPlaying the GameCogs in CogsNo God's a ManThe FaceValedictory"The group's first U.S. release in two years featured ornate playing from Kerry Minnear on keyboards and Gary Green's loudest guitar work up to that time. The Power and the Glory is also a fairly dissonant album, yet it made the charts, albeit pretty low. There seems to be a unifying theme having to do with one's place in the social order, but it's very vague in contrast to Pink Floyd's re-creations of the post-'60s drug experience, Yes' sweeping album-length suites, and ELP's sci-fi epics. "No God's a Man" is an infinitely more challenging piece of music than anything on Jethro Tull's Aqualung, but that wasn't a commercial virtue; nor could the electric violin break on "The Face" or the rippling electric guitar passages throughout cover the effort involved in absorbing these songs. The Power and the Glory vaguely resembled Genesis' early art-rock albums, but without any presence as charismatic as Peter Gabriel. "Playing the Game" and "So Sincere" were the most accessible tracks and ended up as key parts of their concert set." - Allmusic
    $19.00
  • Fourth album from this excellent Italian progressive rock band. Madame Zelle is a concept album based on the life of double agent Mata Hari. Plenty of solos from keyboards and flute without sounding dated. In fact this doesn't sound like 70s Italian prog at all - they achieve a contemporary sound that bears a striking similarity to White Willow's Storm Season period. I wish vocalist Simona Rigano sang in English. It would bring this band acceptance from a much broader audience. She has a nice voice that serves the music quite well. Overall an album with a nice flow to it. Highly recommended.
    $19.00
  • Remastered edition of this classic progressive hard rock album from the British twin axe attack.  Comes with three bonus tracks.
    $5.00