Identity (2LP Vinyl)

SKU: KAR046LP
Label:
Karisma Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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180 gram double LP vinyl set of this debut release from this great Norwegian prog band.  This features a new analog mix for vinyl as well as some new modified artwork.

Airbag is a new young prog band from Norway. Their music has a dreamy quality that will have you floating in the clouds. If you are fan of Riverside's lighter moments you will spooge over this. Definite references to Radiohead and Porcupine Tree will spring to mind as you listen. The music never explodes - it takes the slow fire approach creating constant tension. Lots of beautiful melodies wafting through your skull from the first listen. Highly recommended. These guys could potentially break big.

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