All Rights Removed (2LP Vinyl)

SKU: KAR066LP
Label:
Karisma Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Second album from this Norwegian band finds them climbing the ladder of melancholy prog bands. Short on complexity but long on atmosphere and melody, Airbag's new one packs an emotional wallop. The album has just enough spacey keyboards to draw comparisons to Pink Floyd and older Porcupine Tree. The album builds up to the 17 minute "Homesick I - III" which has enough references to Wish You Were Here that you'll be plowing through your Floyd collection afterwards. Lethal atmospheric prog that will annihilate the minds of any Anathema or Riverside fan. Highly recommended.  180 gram double LP vinyl set cut form the analogue masters specifically for vinyl.

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  • "Iridule pushes on the most abstract language derived from the avant-garde music of the Twentieth century (Ligeti, Xenakis, Nancarrow), but also on a typically rock rhythmical drive, thanks to a more aggressive drum-and-bass section and to heavier and multi-faceted sound, on the edge between Henry Cow, King Crimson and Frank Zappa, with the further novelty of the voice. You won’t miss, as in Labirinto d’acqua, great dynamical ranges, a scrupulous tymbrical research, an even more articulated and stratified rhythmical detail. Important guests as Elaine Di Falco, Dave Willey, Mike Johnson, Dave Kerman (practically speaking, the whole of Thinking Plague!), Guy Segers (Univers Zero), Michele Epifani (Areknames) and others make a kaleidoscopic and astonishing album."
    $16.00
  • Shame US fans never got to see Eloy perform.  I'm still bummed about their Nearfest cancellation.  On the other hand we have this new 2CD live set to ease the pain.  It was recorded on the last German tour and features an expanded lineup.  This is the first live Eloy album since 1978's masterpiece "Eloy Live".  Material tends to concentrate on Silent Cries & Mighty Echoes to more recent times.  All in all its almost 2 1/2 hours long and complements the first live album to give you a good overview of the band's canon.  Highly recommended."When, after 11 years of complete abstinence, they brought out an album again in 2009 with "Visionary", it was greeted with astonishment. Most assumed that the band had taken their departure from the music business in 1998 with Ocean 2 "The Answer", especially as bandleader, Frank Bornemann, had always stressed that ELOY was a part of the musical culture of the 20th century and no longer fitted into the new millennium.However, he had probably not anticipated how much his band's music would continue to reverberate in the new millennium. The back catalogue reached six-digit sales figures with the remasters versions, and on the internet portals, the tribute to the German prog-rock legend accumulated in unexpected ways. Touched by this appreciation, and impressed by the many years of unremitting worldwide fan-power, the band re-formed, made up entirely from the musicians who had previously influenced the group's music as permanent members. The firm intent of properly saying 'thank you' for so much loyalty finally also brought the ultimate line-up back to the stage. With, for the first time, two guitarists, two keyboardists, bass, drums, two backing singers from the studio sessions and a solo vocalist for the highlights from "The Apocalypse" and "The Tides Return Forever" repertoire, they delivered an impressive retrospective of the band's history on stage. In the storm of enthusiasm every evening in almost consistently sold-out venues, some of the titles often exceeded the studio originals. Cheered on by a euphoric fanbase, the band often outdid themselves making recordings of phenomenal expressive power, which now find their way to the fans as the first and only live audio documentary since 1978. The unique atmosphere which accompanies the experience on stage resurrects the former Spirit of ELOY with emotion and passion, and this has finally led to the band giving this live documentary – offered as a double-CD in a high value 8-page digi-pack with a running time of over 140 minutes - a very special title: REINCARANTION ON STAGEDisc 11. Namaste2. Child Migration3. Paralized Civilization4. Mysterious Monolith5. Age of Insanity6. The Apocalypse7. Silhouette8. Poseidon's Creation9. Time to Turn10. The Sun Song11. Horizons12. IlluminationsDisc 21. Follow the Light2. Awakening of Consciousness3. The Tides Return Forever4. Ro Setau5. Mystery6. Decay of Logos7. Atlantis Agony8. The Bells of Notre Dame9. Thoughts
    $22.00
  • "Progressive Power Metal was a genre popularized by titans such as ICED EARTH and NEVERMORE, combining the technicality, speed and fantastical lyrics of power, and the complexity and maturity of Prog. TRAGODIA, a Progressive Power Metal band from Italy, have proved once again why the genre is in such a strong position in the metal world, and why it is nigh-faultless. Writing music that exudes heavy influence from the aforementioned bands, TRAGODIA add their own brand of catchiness and groove to make it their own. After all, the whole point of a progressive band is to be progressive and push genre boundaries.Their new album, "Mythmaker", contains almost all of the great qualities of such an album: it's heavy, it's melodic, it's progressive, it's catchy, it's heavy, it's groovy, it's…  Heavy. It is by no means calm and jazzy, such as some of the work from the penultimate DREAM THEATER. In the mixing, the heavily over-driven guitars, and the drums, are at the forefront, adding vertebrae to the heavyweight backbone that drives this album. "A Cry Among the Stars", the opening, and one of my favorite song on the album, begins with an epic buildup reminiscent of SERENITY, cuts in with riffage worthy of neck snapping headbanging which paves the way for verses that contain an obvious DREAM THEATER note of trippy syncopation. Lucas Meloni, proves to have some vocal versatility, often switching between majestic, powerful notes, and Thrash-like yells. The twin guitarists have already proven, in the song's solo, that they are capable of an incredible dual-axe attack. "The Oracle" is one of the heaviest tracks on the album with crushing riffage all around, supplemented by guitar harmony that is on a Scandinavian level; best solo on the album, and there are many to choose from. "A Temple in Time" is a relatively chilled-out track in comparison, with an incredibly catchy guitar / keyboard harmony. I am hearing a lot of old FIREWIND in this track. The next track, "Wisdom in the Meadows of Sorrow" comes across as a highly versatile track, combining riffage reminiscent of AMON AMARTH, and the wails of JUDAS PRIEST; overall, this creates an incredibly driving track. "Tidal Waves of Greatness" is exactly that; smooth, yet anxious transitions between acoustic passages and grandiose and dramatic choruses. "Once In Arcadia" is another dominating heavyweight with riffage that is not only devastating, but also extremely catchy; very reminiscent of IN FLAMES; another standout track for me. "The Stone and the Idol" is the longest track on the record, though only capping out at 6:21. It starts with an allusion to yet even more epicenes with a tasteful symphonic intro, and leads into extremely groovy riffage, and ends with the best outro riff on the entire record."Born Under Niobe" may be constituted as the heaviest track, which is definitely saying something. The song begins with a downright battery and harsh, thrashy vocals, and riffage so heavy that leaves your brain pulsing with the force of the kicks. The chorus' vocal melody is extremely catchy, and Meloni proves his excellent vocal capabilities. It leaves you completely unprepared for a repeat of the previous bombard, and soon we hear a classic gallop passage that leaves one with the urge to windmill the beards off that the song has just made us grow. "Mythmaker" is an interesting track, opening with an unexpected tapping bass solo that paves the way for some pounding, driving groove riffage that constitutes the majority of the song, and leads seamlessly into the fantastic instrumental, "The Weeping Rock Of Seriphus". Arguably, this song doubles as both an outro and an extension of "Mythmaker", concluding the album in a dramatic, lengthy fashion. Finally, the bonus track, "Downfall Of The Ancients"; I struggle to see why this song was left out as a bonus track, for it most definitely deserves to be on the record. The atmospheric keyboard tracking is absolutely gorgeous, and complements the song very fittingly; with the rugged vocal work, combines to make a highly engaging track.To sum up this work of metal mastery, TRAGODIA are simply one of the reasons Progressive and Power Metal are my two favorite genres of Metal, and do their home country of Italy proud; absolutely deserving of more publicity, and I believe would make an unforgettable live performance." - Metal Temple
    $14.00
  • "Periphery have been an omnipresent force in the prog metalcore realm since their first album released in 2010 – band founder Misha Mansoor has served as producer on several of the genre’s albums, and the other members are all famous in their own right, whether it’s simply for their craft (Matt Halpern), their involvement in other projects (Spencer Sotelo, Mark Holcomb, Nolly Getgood), or just simply being the nephew of someone exceedingly famous (Jake Bowen). This makes whatever they decide to do extremely important, and the band’s decision to release a concept double album has created hype of hugelargic proportions. In my humble opinion, the band has delivered on all fronts, but not without some disappointments in the “could’ve been” area.Since their inception, Periphery have changed from a chugga-chug ambidjent project posting demos on the internet in the late 2000s to a full-fledged prog metal band with heavy elements of metalcore, post-hardcore, and pop music in general. If you weren’t onboard for “Periphery II”, “Juggernaut” likely won’t change your mind (unless your issues were relatively small), as it’s more of the same poppy atmosphere and less of the techy downtuned riffs, though god knows THOSE are still around. But there’s also a lot of style experimentation – jazz fusion, death metal, and various forms of electronica are all utilized on a semi-normal basis, and range from being seamlessly integrated into the music to being tacked on to the ends of songs like gluing a top-rate dildo onto an already particularly throbby penis. If this all sounds a bit schizophrenic, rest assured that the songcraft is, for the most part, tighter than it’s ever been. Singles from Alpha like “22 Faces” and “Alpha” itself show off Periphery’s pop prowess with choruses and hooks that refuse to leave your head, and complex riffs that are somehow just as ‘wormy as the vocals. And the songs on Omega are longer, more complex, and still manage to be as infectious as the most annoying of STDs – even the twelve minute sprawling title track that has more in common with the bombastic riffs of Periphery I has a shapely middle section that rivals even the hottest of…ugh, fuck it, done with the metaphors. It’s just insane. I cried when I heard it.And now onto what I don’t care for; first off, the decision to split the album into two parts was definitely well-informed from a marketing standpoint. Most people don’t go around listening to 80 minute records all day, myself included, and the supposedly delicate structure of a concept album also means that listening to Juggernaut by skipping to different songs would devalue the experience. So the band broke it into two records to make it seem more manageable to listen to in daily life. Another stated reason was so that newcomers to the band would be able to buy Alpha at a discounted price, decide if they liked it, and then purchase Omega if they were so inclined (music previewing doesn’t work like that anymore, but hey you can’t fault the band for trying to turn that into tangible record sales). The problem I have is that Omega isn’t really paced to be its own album, which makes releasing it on its own instead as simply as the second disc in a package a little pointless. It’s not like the excellent “The Afterman” double albums from Coheed and Cambria, which were each albums that worked in their own right. I realize that this is really just semantics, but I think calling Juggernaut both the third and fourth album from Periphery, while technically correct, is just disingenuous, and judging them fairly on their own as separate albums is impossible (which is why all reviews being published are including them together).Periphery has always had a unique way of pacing their albums, regularly including playful, sometimes relatively lengthy interludes between tracks. Juggernaut is no different, and these interludes are now occasionally used to seed songs that will appear later on the album, or provide callbacks to tracks already present. The transitions aren’t always elegant however, and can range from grin-inducing to head-scratching to just plain grating. Thankfully, the band isn’t going for the illusion that each song flows seamlessly into the next, at least no more than they were going for it on any of their previous albums, and it’s easy to get used to everything given multiple listens.Overall, Juggernaut is a dense album that’s going to take a myriad of listens to fully sink in, just like most of the band’s prior releases (I don’t think anyone is gonna argue that “Clear” has any depth that you would find after about the fifth listen or so, but hey hey that’s ok kay). But it’s also accessible on the surface with deceptively simple rhythms and poppy choruses, which draw you in to appreciate the deeper cuts. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes unique and thoughtful music in the post-hardcore, metalcore, and progressive metal genres, but I’d also recommend it to anyone ever, because this is my absolute favorite band and I think they’ve created a masterpiece. So take from that what you will, and then get the fuck out of here. The play button is calling my name." - iprobablyhateyourband.com
    $11.00
  • Second album from this British project conceived by multi-instrumentalist Kevin Lawry.  He handles vocals, guitar, bass, and keys while Darin McCloskey in the drummer.  Lawry brought in Brian Anthony to handle all Mellotron parts.  The best way to describe this band would be "doom prog".  It has a clear 70s vibe - perhaps a bit like Atomic Rooster - but a band like Cathedral (the British one) come to mind.  There is a dark element present here.  The quieter, Mellotron-laden, parts could have easily been lifted off of Camel's Mirage album.  The songs tend to settle into a groove with loooong spacey parts ever present with outbursts of Iommi riffing cropping up at just the right time.  Great stuff.
    $24.00
  • In my opinion one of the most important progressive rock albums of the '70s. Although Di Giacomo sat it out again the band is surprisingly none the poorer. This instrumental masterpiece is a stunning melding of orchestra and rock band. It is an incredibly mature work that simply took the band to the upper echelon of progressive bands. With the addition of Alan King on sax and flute the band became a literal orchestra. Where the band ends and the Orchestra dell'Unione Musicisti di Roma begins is questionable. I could go on and on about this one. A sublime effort that is firmly entrenched in my Top 10 albums of all time. 
    $11.00
  • OK now this is over the top indulgent and incredibly limited.  I doubt we will be able to restock it as a limited amount has been made available for North America.  This is an oversized hardbound slipcased book with a 44 page booklet.  It also comes with a CD plus a DVD with the album in 5.1 surround and 24 bit hi-res stereo mixes.  Finally there is a second DVD with a "making of" documentary.  Certain to be a collector's item in years to come."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $70.00
  • "There’s a certain irony to a band naming its debut album A Long Time Listening and then waiting five years to release its follow-up – but whether by accident or design, this is exactly what Agent Fresco have done. In the interim, however, with only occasional ventures outside of their native Iceland, the quartet have managed to build something of a cult following with music that is both electrifying and emotional in equal measure. Amongst their fanbase, anticipation levels for second album Destrier are several orders of magnitude beyond stratospheric. So how can they possibly be met?So let’s put everyone who may have clicked on this review with a sense of trepidation at ease as soon as possible, because not only have Agent Fresco met those expectations, they have surpassed them with almost astonishing ease. Destrier is, bluntly, a fucking masterpiece. Whether you read what follows this paragraph or not, you need to hear Destrier as soon as you can. You have been told.For those of you that are still with us, let’s delve a bit deeper into exactly what makes Destrier (pronounced DE-streer, linguistics fans) so very special. Like its predecessor, the contextual nucleus of the album is an extensive exploration of the complex web of emotions surrounding a pivotal event in the life of singer Arnor Dan Arnarson. Whereas the theme of A Long Time Listening was the grief following the death of his father, Destrier deals with the aftermath of a particularly violent attack that left some significant physical and mental injuries. As one might expect, Destrier is a considerably more burly – at times even angry – affair.A significant proportion of what makes Agent Fresco’s music so special is how cohesively the band operate together. Throughout Destrier, they pulse, flex, twitch and turn together like the sinews of a single, well-honed muscle. There is layer upon layer of complexity in the sound they create, yet it coalesces into something so immediately accessible that it reaches out to hug the listener like a long-lost friend even during that first, glorious, play through the record.What’s more, whilst each individual track stands firmly on its own two feet, they are given an extra lease of life in the context of the album as a whole. This is particularly apparent with lead single “Dark Water“, whose eruption out of the ominous, brooding, Massive Attack-esque tones of opening track “Let Them See Us” pushes it into a practically euphoric release. The album ebbs and flows as a single, continuous work of art that makes pushing the stop button tremendously difficult, so it’s best to make sure you have a free hour for that first listen. What’s more, as my colleague and our resident Icelander Jon Þor pointed out to me, final track “Mono No Aware” fades down to the same delicate note that opens the album after reprising the title track. This effectively means that the album loops almost seamlessly, which is a magical thing.The titular Destrier itself is a type of medieval war horse, whose use was reserved for battle alone. It is metaphorically deployed here by Arnor as a kind of spirit animal, giving him the fortitude to confront the anger and vulnerability he felt in the aftermath of the attack. This shows neatly the cryptic yet vivid imagery that Arnor is capable of conjuring through his lyrics, placing him in the same league as Maynard James Keenan, perhaps coupled with Muse‘s Matt Bellamy in both his sense of theatre and his achingly beautiful falsetto. However, without access to a full lyric sheet as I write, I’ll refrain from any hamfisted analysis of half-heard lines; I think it deserves more than that.Destrier also shows that whilst their music is almost immediately identifiable as Agent Fresco, they are not bound by any restrictions of genre, making the album as much of a musical voyage of adventure and exploration as a lyrical one. Perhaps the most surprising moment lies in the title track itself, which suddenly drops into dense, practically atonal shards of syncopated noise. Elsewhere, elements of greasy garage rock, slinky lounge music and soft, bubbling electronica can be found alongside more familiar choruses (which are often big enough to be visible from space), delicate piano-led sections and ebullient math-rock riffing.With more dynamic surprises like the vulnerability of “Bemoan” dropping into the brash savagery of “Angst” to be discovered, Destrier is a near-perfect artistic expression that stimulates mind, body and spirit in equal measure. Listeners may well find themselves immediately besotted, then even more deeply gratified through repeated listens.As you can probably tell, Destrier is a most uncommon delight. It will almost certainly prove to be one of the most essential listens of 2015, and maybe an even longer timescale than that. We can only hope that it won’t take another five years for Agent Fresco to release their next album, but even if that does happen, we will probably not have tired of this one by then. Destrier is a masterpiece; a glorious, life-affirming masterpiece that, once heard, will make you wonder how you managed without it. Go seek." - The Monolith
    $15.00
  • "The music here is a hypnotizing blend of intricate, locked-in interaction and red-hot energy that will remind you that sometimes the letters 'L-O-U-D' can spell 'jazz'. Zevious will also remind you that sometimes the most influential jazz is controversial.According to the band, the goal on Passing Through the Wall is to induce a trance-like state in the listener through repetition, non-conventional melody and challenging song structure. The compositions are based around large cycles of layered poly-rhythmic patterns against octave displaced melodies; the individual parts working together to create dense, pulsating textures."
    $15.00
  • Private vinyl edition released by the band.Second album from this great French ensemble. Curiously their first album was released by Tzadik and had to be the most overtly "prog" album ever on that label. This new album is out on Altrock and is probably my favorite release on the label. The band creates a mesmerizing whirlwind of sax, keys, vibes, bass, flue, bass, and drums. There is a touch of Zappa in the compositions probably due to the vibes/marimbas that remind of Ruth Underwood. Some sexy Mini-Moog leads squiggle around the dual sax leads. All in all one killer release. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • One of the really great progressive bands from the 90s is back with their first album in 7 years.  The band is fronted by Fredrick Ohlsson, one of the great voices in metal.  He sounds very much like prime era Geoff Tate so the band has often been compared to Queensryche.  Truth is there is more of a melancholy/doom power vibe going on but there are progressive overtones and it never becomes plodding in a Sabbath/St. Vitus/Candlemass way.  Its all kind of weird since this is a professed Christian band and those themes do crop up.  Even still Veni Domine should be enshrined in the Metal Hall Of Fame."After nearly seven years of silence, we hear again from Swedish metal band Veni Domine (latin: Come Lord) with their new album Light, now with Massacre Records. Early in their nearly 30 year career the band got 'labeled' as a doom metal band. It's a rather interesting thing as the band pursues Christian themes in their lyrics. Christian is not a religion of doom and despair, but of life and hope.Nevertheless, with a spin of Light, you may hear some of those 'doom' elements: deep sound and a brooding pace. Even Fredrik Sjöholm's voice has low, sober, feel. Yet, Veni Domine work in other elements as well like both symphonic and acoustic elements, and some simply fundamental heavy metal. Where They Story Ends is good example of the merger of the elements. It's at once atmospheric, heavy, and somber, yet gets speedy later on. This is perhaps the reason why some listener tack on 'progressive' when speaking of the band. Alternatively, listening to In Memoriam or Last Silence Before Eternity, the mood and music of Veni Domine might remind of Candlemass-like epic doom metal. More curious company to keep. Sometimes the mood, pace, and soberness of the music matches the title of the song as with Waiting, moved along mostly by voice, acoustic guitar, and steady drums. Finally, the band revisits some of their past by re-recording Oh Great City from their first album 1991's Fall Babylon Fall. I've never heard the original, so I can't speak to difference. It is, however, more brooding heavy metal. If progressive, sometimes epic, doom metal is your flavor of the month, you'll likely enjoy Veni Domine's Light." - Dangerdog.com
    $15.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • "Rafał Paluszek, band’s keyboardist comments: “Our new album, just like it was with Particles (2013), is not a concept album. We abandoned that as a creative method. And when we came up with the title ‘The After-Effect’, it was partly as a joke. An after-effect is a consequence, the result of all that's going on in our lives. Every album sums up a certain episode in your life. It crowns a certain creative process, which is, after all, brought about by something, and which is a lasting phenomenon. We experience certain things, every event has some influence on what we do. Why shouldn't that apply to the music we create? In a relatively short period of time, 2/5 of Osada Vida's lineup has changed. Such changes are like a tsunami - there are losses, but there's also a reason to build something new, something we wouldn't dare to build back in the untroubled days. We don't know what effects today's events will have. Looking at it from a mathematical perspective, there's an infinite number of paths, each branching out into an infinite number of paths as well, and so on. That's what The After-Effect (2014) is.”"
    $15.00
  • Sometimes there are great albums that just float underneath everyone's radar.  Poor distribution, small label - or simply a band is just too far ahead of the curve for collector's to catch up.   Sooner or later they do.  That's just the nature of collecting music.  Such is the case of Sway.  Many years ago I stumbled across a copy of this obscure Italian album from 1973 and could not find any mention of it beyond one advanced collector mentioning "Oh yeah that's rare".  At the time there was little interest from the rock community in modal jazz, souljazz, space jazz, kosmigroov - whatever you want to call it.  Jazz collectors may well have been aware of the album but perhaps because the lineup consisted of relatively unknown (outside of Italy) musicians, no one really paid much attention to the album.  I did my fair share of turning friends and collectors on to the album.  Maybe it made a difference.  All I know is that finding a copy of the album now is next to impossible.So what the hell am I exactly talking about?  Sway is a quintet led by noted jazz pianist Sante Palumbo (he's still going today!).  The rest of the lineup consists of journeymen session players: Hugo Heredia (alto/tenor sax, flute), Sergio Farina (guitar), Marco Ratti (acoustic/electric bass), and Lino Liguori (drums/percussion).  If you are a fan of electric Miles Davis or Weather Report you must hear this album.Palumbo is the focal point of the band - his runs on acoustic and electric piano are breathtaking.  This guy can tear of the keys.  The music has that definite kosmigroov sound.  Electric piano plays off of wah-wah laced guitar, some nice skronking sax (and at times gorgeous, liquid flute) and a rock solid rhythmic foundation.  There are some parts to the album which have a slightly freer vibe but for the most part is quite accessible.  If you listen carefully you might hear strains of a sound that bears a kinship to Canterbury. New authorized reissue from Schema Records.  BUY OR DIE!
    $29.00